Talk:Formation and evolution of the Solar System

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Angular Momentum in Pre-Solar Nebula[edit]

The article doesn't explain what caused the initial angular momentum in the pre-solar nebula. If gravity was the only force acting in the early stages of solar system formation, wouldn't material in the proto-cloud simply have flowed inward toward an expanding gravitational center? Virgil H. Soule (talk) 17:59, 21 August 2012 (UTC)

Only if the pre-solar nebula were perfectly still and collapsed directly. However, there are random motions in any star forming cloud (they're highly turbulent beasts) which means the gas has angular momentum when compared to the gravitational center. Just a little bit of random motion a large distance from the gravitational center is a lot of angular momentum. I'm not sure how or where this should go into the article, and I don't have an immediate ref, though one should be pretty easy to find. —Alex (ASHill | talk | contribs) 00:15, 22 August 2012 (UTC)
It does not explain what caused the initial angular momentum in the pre-solar nebula because they do not want to bring attention to the falsification of their model with basic physics. If there is angular momentum (and there is a hell of a lot of it in the objects that orbit the Sun), then how exactly is the angular momentum mostly in Jupiter and Saturn, and the mass mostly in the Sun? If any spinning disk model or theory of solar system formation were correct, then the Sun should possess the most angular momentum and the outer objects should possess very little, but we observe the complete opposite of this. Angular momentum is a conserved quantity, you don't just put the majority of the angular momentum in Jupiter and Saturn, but that is exactly what is observed. Astronomers want to ignore this problem because it is very simple and destroys the disk models and all the variants. Not only that, but there are other problems that are also ignored. The spinning disk models and theories are basically zombies. They are dead, but still walking around, infecting the minds of unsuspecting students at University and wikipedia readers who don't know any better.Trilliant (talk) 02:06, 17 May 2017 (UTC)

Error?[edit]

"Eventually, after trillions more years, the Sun will finally cease to shine altogether, becoming a black dwarf." Seriously after trillions of years? --Hartz (talk) 05:58, 29 October 2012 (UTC)

True. Forgot to change that after the new reference. Serendipodous 07:05, 29 October 2012 (UTC)

end of water on Earth[edit]

We say, "In one billion years' time, as the Sun's radiation output increases, its circumstellar habitable zone will move outwards, making the Earth's surface too hot for liquid water to exist there naturally. At this point, all life on land will become extinct. Evaporation of water, a potent greenhouse gas, from the oceans' surface could accelerate temperature increase, potentially ending all life on Earth even sooner."

From what I understand, that's not what we think will happen. In about a tenth that time, the increasing solar output will increase the height of water vapor in the atmosphere until it reaches the stratosphere, where it will dissociate and the hydrogen will be lost to space. In another 100My the oceans will be gone. Earth will thus loose its water long before surface temperatures would otherwise be too great for liquid water. — kwami (talk) 16:03, 3 October 2013 (UTC)

if that's true, a source would be really helpful. Most of the sources I have read say that the threat to life in hte next gyr is not ocean depletion, but CO2 starvation. Serendipodous 17:16, 3 October 2013 (UTC)

Early composition quibble[edit]

Isn't this statement in the article is a little off the mark: "The composition of this region with a mass just over that of the Sun was about the same as that of the Sun today..."?

A Wikipedia article on the sun says the sun in its lifetime has converted about 100 earth masses to energy. Solar nuclear reactions only convert about 0.7% of hydrogen mass to energy, so this means 14,000 earth masses worth of hydrogen have been fused to helium. The total mass of the sun is 333,000 earths, so during its 4.7 billion years as a main sequence star the sun must have converted 4.2% = (14,000/333,000) of its total mass from hydrogen to helium.

Don Fulton

 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.61.212.124 (talk) 20:42, 2 December 2013 (UTC) 

Nice model[edit]

The third paragraph states that "The position of the planets often shifted, and planets have switched places". However nowhere in the reference used (Gomes et al. 2005) is planetary orbit switching mentioned. What IS mentioned is that orbital periods of Jupiter and Saturn crossed their mean mean motion resonance (MMR) ratio of 1:2. Figure 2 of Gomes et al. (2005) indicates that at no point during the period responsible for the Late Heavy Bombardment did the orbits of the four outer planets switch <2>. If the orbits were changed during this chaotic period, then the authors must cite the correct reference.— Preceding unsigned comment added by Steven Corder (talkcontribs) 11:46, 26 August 2014‎ (UTC)

Redirection? Nothing's there![edit]

Did you try taking a look at where it's now redirecting? A section here: I tried both reading through and searching on the entire page (CtrlF) - nothing EXPLAINING the concept or whatever which is at least definitely referrable. So you know what? Let's just make THIS a normal article: if somebody has something to say, or drop me a template if you have a good source or two — let us start it any way!.. Lincoln J. (talk) 11:59, 19 October 2015 (UTC)

Based on Lincoln J.'s editing history, I'm guessing that this might have something to do with this edit from 2008 in which Serendipodous turned Early bombardment phase into a redirect to Formation and evolution of the Solar System#Terrestrial planets. Apparently, the connection between these two is unclear and Lincoln J. would like to re-start the Early bombardment phase article. This could be a good idea if high quality sources are found. Alternatively, the Terrestrial planets section in this article could be edited to make the connection between it and the early bombardment phase clearer. What do others think? --Dodi 8238 (talk) 12:27, 19 October 2015 (UTC) [edited 16:06, 19 October 2015 (UTC)]

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Sun's beginning[edit]

In several places this article equates the "beginning" of the sun with the onset of nuclear fusion, which is also when it enters the main sequence. However, as far as I know, the official beginning of a star, including our sun, is when it transitions from a Protostar to a Pre-main-sequence star. Zyxwv99 (talk) 23:37, 19 March 2016 (UTC)

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Problem with table[edit]

At the end of the article, the second-to-last event listed says the sun will cool to 5K in a quadrillion years, then to 9K in several quadrillion years. Obviously this is a mistake since the sun would not heat back up several K after the passage of that much time.

Bomb319 (talk) 13:55, 12 February 2017 (UTC)

There is another problem, 4.6 billion years - 10 billion years is not 4.6 billion years, it is 4.59 billion years — Preceding unsigned comment added by V620 Cephei (talkcontribs) 20:00, 8 May 2017 (UTC)