Talk:H.323

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H.323 in Linux kernel[edit]

The Linux kernel doesn't "implement" H.323. The experimental feature which was added in version 2.6.17 is a module to allow H.323 connection tracking. This is different from implementing H.323. When you build what is known as a stateful firewall, you sometimes want to allow connections that are "related" to other connections. For example, in the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), the client connects to a server, establishing a control connection, and when data is to be transmited, the server connects to the client to send them. This connection may be rejected by the client firewall, because it sees someone from outside is apparently trying to connect to the client host without a reason. However, by allowing "related" connections, your goal is that the firewall sees that the new incoming connection is related to an already established connection with a server, and must be accepted.

This capability is very useful to build simple firewalls, and several protocols benefit from the kernel being able to identify related connections. The Linux kernel has several modules to allow related connection tracking from several different protocols, such as:

  • SCTP (marked EXPERIMENTAL)
  • FTP
  • IRC
  • Netbios name service (marked EXPERIMENTAL)
  • TFTP
  • Amanda
  • PPTP
  • H.323 (marked EXPERIMENTAL)

However, this does not mean that the kernel implements somehow those protocols. It does not. It only includes the required logic to identify those connections, establish relation between connections and allow simpler firewalling rules. The new option is available in this section of the kernel menuconfig:

 -> Networking                                                                                                                     
   -> Networking support (NET [=y])                                                                                                                 
     -> Networking options                                                                                                                          
       -> Network packet filtering (replaces ipchains) (NETFILTER [=y])                                                                             
         -> IP: Netfilter Configuration                                                                                                             
           -> Connection tracking (required for masq/NAT) (IP_NF_CONNTRACK [=m])

--212.59.212.39 00:59, 21 June 2006 (UTC)

timeline for H.323 adoption[edit]

Suggestion: I would like to know the timelines for the H.323 adoption process - specifically when this protocol began to be developed and when it was adopted. Zollinmh 20:30, 28 June 2007 (UTC)

I am also interested in this information. I have added a template requesting it to the section in the article. --Kvng (talk) 15:15, 15 June 2010 (UTC)
Discussion about H.323 started in 1993 or 1994, but actually work on the protocol (in terms of writing a standard) did not start until 1995. There was a significant amount of effort put into the standard and the first version was approved in 1996. H.323 version 2 came in 1998, H.323 version 3 in 1999, and H.323 version 4 in 2000. Work has progressed steadily over the years and the current version is H.323v7. This is interesting historical information, but not extremely important in terms of describing the protocol and its purpose. Paulej (talk) 21:57, 9 August 2012 (UTC)

Technical context needed[edit]

  • Where does this protocol fit into the OSI model or equivalent?
  • When the article says this protocol is "based on" Q.931, does that mean "runs on top of" or "is compatible with"?

-- Beland 15:51, 11 October 2007 (UTC)

Proposal for a new article[edit]

Please find below a proposal for a new article on H.323. Feel free to contact us regarding any of the changes made. If there are no comments within the next days the edits are considered supported and we will publish the revised article. ITU-T 11:05, 27 February 2008 (UTC)

The suggested changes were presumably incorporated into the article. I have deleted the copy that was included here. --Kvng (talk) 15:15, 15 June 2010 (UTC)

Connection to SIP, XMPP/Jabber/Jingle[edit]

Please mention the connection of H.323 to SIP, XMPP, Jabber and Jingle. -Pgan002 (talk) 04:13, 31 December 2008 (UTC)