Talk:Husting

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Untitled[edit]

The actual word both singular and plural is 'Hustings'. 'Husting' as it is listed here is no longer in use. This page needs to be moved to "Hustings"

The beginning of the article notes, "By metonymy, the term may now refer to any event, such as debates or speeches, during an election campaign where one or more of the representative candidates are present." But near the end, it states, "The literal husting of pre-1872 Parliamentary elections is no longer used, but the term is now applied to a meeting at which more than one candidate participates." So there's a discrepancy on whether the term can be applied to an event with only one candidate. Can anyone clarify this? Thanks. Ropcat 04:13, 28 September 2007 (UTC)
Current U.S. usage seems to be plural only, as in "Gubernatorial candidate Joe Jones was out on the hustings today in Metropolis and Smallville, where he was met largely by an enthusiastic crowd." Don't know as it somehow implies the presence of multiple candidates as such meetups are now in the U.S. almost universally styled as "debates", even when the activites engaged in at such are often at wide variance of the classic definition of "debate". Usage of "hustings" isn't likely to be discussed outside of a journal of lingusitics, so if this usage is to be incorporated into the article, perhpas several references to popular articles where the term is used in this way would be adequate to establish it as verifiable and encyclopedic so that it can be incorporated into the article without being original research to put it there. 75.252.140.6 (talk) 14:42, 13 August 2012 (UTC)
Also, we need a list article of "journalese" terms, which are terms they must teach journalists in journalism courses or maybe on the job, because you never hear or read them anywhere else. Hustings is one. Or calling an earthquake a "temblor." And empty firearms cartriges will inevitably and incorrectly be called "shell casings." Also, a journalist cannot use the world "gold" in an article more than twice without resorting to speaking of "the yellow metal." LOL. There are many more but I can't think of them at the moment. SBHarris 00:08, 14 August 2012 (UTC)

"Modern Usage" Section[edit]

I have tried to tighten up this section a little, but don't have sufficient information to justify changes that I suspect are necessary. Specifically, the first sentence formerly read,

In using the term in reference to the British parliament during the 1800s, husting referred to a platform in the Guildhall on which the London court was held, and evolved to mean any platform upon which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election is made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.

I have removed some superfluous verbiage to make it,

In British usage during the 1800s, husting meant a platform in the Guildhall on which the London court was held. It evolved to mean a platform upon which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election was made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.

But I suspect it should actually read something like this:

In British usage, husting originally meant a platform in the Guildhall on which the London court was held, but it evolved during the 1800s to mean a platform upon which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election was made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.

I haven't made that change because I don't know the history, and it's not 100% certain that's what the original author meant. If indeed that's what the section should tell us, it should also give us more information about how and why the term evolved as it did, and, of course, it should make reference to some published authorities as well. J. D. Crutchfield | Talk 19:40, 2 June 2014 (UTC)

The mention of 'stump' as an American equal may not be correct (I'm Australian - check with a Yank). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 60.226.148.177 (talk) 04:58, 28 July 2014 (UTC)