Talk:Jackanory

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Should we start a [[Category:Jackanory presenters]]? I can't imagine what use it would be, but it might be interesting nonetheless. --Paul A 08:34, 14 Sep 2004 (UTC)

Yes. 66.92.237.111 03:56, 23 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Is the list of people who have read on Jackanory exhaustive? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.10.72.136 (talk) 20:11, 12 May 2008 (UTC)

Origin of the title[edit]

As I understand it, the rhyme was part of an old union song, rather than a nursery rhyme. Certainly it seems to be pretty much entirely unknown beyond being trotted out now and again as an explanation for the title of the TV show. --Q4 22:13, 15 July 2005 (UTC)

During a programme called "From Andy Pandy to Zebedee: The Golden Age of Children's Television" on BBC3, on 21December 2015, someone, talking about the origin of the name, said that the rhyme was part of an old political song. I don't have 20/20 memory of what was said, but it was something to do with members of the old British Whig Party stabbing members of the old Tory Party: they stabbed one, then another, "...and now my story is done." Apparently, choosing the name Jackanory for the programme was someone's attempt to ruffle some feathers in Government, but no-one noticed. Sorry this is vague, but I hope it might stir someone else's memory. Pollythewasp (talk) 10:37, 22 December 2015 (UTC)

Prince Charles[edit]

Did Prince Charles read his own story the Old Man of Lochnagar?

Yes he did, back in 1984. BillyH 02:09, 9 December 2005 (UTC)

Winnie the Pooh[edit]

Willie Rushton read "Winnine the Pooh", not listed in the article at present. I don't know how to edit an article or cite a source - abridged VHS recordings of it come up on ebay UK regularly. From my memory only, I think he went on to read "The House at Pooh Corner". His voices for all the characters, especially Pooh and Eyeore were definitive. Mjybfe (talk) 13:03, 19 May 2009 (UTC)