Talk:Keemun

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject China (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject China, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of China related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Stone Fruit?[edit]

It is news to me that any form of Camellia Sinensis is a Drupe. I think the sentence about 'characteristic stone fruit' should be removed. 2602:306:83C8:4F0:59FB:39DB:BF54:92A5 (talk) 23:27, 28 March 2016 (UTC)

Temperature of water[edit]

What temperature of water is traditionally used in China to brew this tea? Badagnani 08:15, 5 September 2007 (UTC)

What temperature of water is traditionally used in China to brew this tea? Badagnani (talk) 15:08, 3 January 2009 (UTC)

Answer: Water temperature for brewing tea can be varied slightly to suit the tea; however, almost all black tea requires boiling water (100° C. or 211° F.). Wu Long, green and Pu'hr teas are often brewed at lesser temperatures. Even Darjeeling is occasionally brewed at 180°-190° F to lower it's astringency (tannic acid).

There are people who believe that Darjeeling is scalded by boiling water and thus too much tannin is released and the tea becomes overly astringent. Such people generally believe water heated to about 190° F. is preferable for Darjeelings. This could well be as I do not fancy many first flush Darjeelings because of astringency, yet I adore the muscatel second flushes and I use boiling water. Perhaps there are some Darjeeling estates that are less skilled in the art of making tea? Remember, the Indian's and English have been making tea for only a tad over 200 years. The Chinese have been working at the art of making tea for many thousands of years! I have learned to look to the Chinese for instruction regarding tea.

Temperature vs. Chemicals People commonly believe that caffeine is the only stimulant in tea and that the strongest teas contain only about half the caffeine of coffee. The latter is true; however, there are over 100 stimulants in tea. —E.g. the asthma drug Theodore™ is made from the chemical theophylline, originally derived from tea. But, to obtain the most theophylline from tea, boiling water must be used. This suggests that other substances are, or are not, released into the tea depending upon water temperature. I was prescribed Theodore™ from ca. 1975 to 1995. My doctor told me that, in an emergency — without my inhaler or drugs, that I should quickly brew 4 bags of any black tea to a very strong cup and drink it as fast as possible. Indeed. This trick saved my life one late night. Despite popular sentiment among tea aficionados, PG Tips is good for something! — Preceding unsigned comment added by Bixlives! (talkcontribs) 05:15, 4 October 2013 (UTC)

Popularity in China[edit]

It's popular in England, but it's known that black tea is not nearly as popular as green, oolong, or pu'erh. What is the relative popularity in China of keemun, and Chinese-produced black teas in general, in contrast to the other (non-black) varieties? Badagnani 08:16, 5 September 2007 (UTC)

It's popular in England, but it's known that black tea is not nearly as popular as green, oolong, or pu'erh. What is the relative popularity in China of keemun, and Chinese-produced black teas in general, in contrast to the other (non-black) varieties? Badagnani (talk) 15:07, 3 January 2009 (UTC)

Need fix[edit]

"Infusion" in the box needs to be fixed. Badagnani 17:44, 4 October 2007 (UTC)

References[edit]

These references should be removed. They are not objective references but merely advertisements. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.152.169.150 (talk) 02:02, 24 October 2009 (UTC)