Talk:Ken Burns effect

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Use in Same Time, Next Year[edit]

The 'Ken Burns Effect' was used in the 1978 movie Same_Time,_Next_Year in the series of photos that preceded each interlude.

the above template belongs on the article, not the Talk Page. Also, please sign your posts. Shawn in Montreal 20:17, 21 September 2007 (UTC)

City of Gold[edit]

And I've provided Burns' own citation of City of Gold as an inspiration.Shawn in Montreal 21:40, 1 August 2007 (UTC)

Video added[edit]

I hope the video example I made is interesting enough. I hope no one minds. --wwwwolf (barks/growls) 20:06, 20 November 2007 (UTC)

Thanks for the video, but it does not seem to illustrate the Ken Burns effect. It is just a montage of photos with no panning or zooming involved. It would be nice if you or someone else could upload a video that better illustrates what the article is about.88.74.214.230 (talk) 21:06, 2 January 2010 (UTC)

Early uses of the effect[edit]

The technique was also in children's programs. I remember watching "moving" stories read from books on the Captain Kangaroo show in the 1960s. — Loadmaster (talk) 17:09, 24 April 2008 (UTC)

Other examples[edit]

I removed these examples from a section called "origins." They require citation and contextualization.

  • The British Broadcasting Corporation's documentary series The Great War, first shown in 1964, used both extensively.
  • Zooming and panning of still images were used in the 1982 title sequence of the sitcom Cheers.

Aolivex (talk) 15:29, 24 February 2016 (UTC)

Multiplane Animation?[edit]

I've also noticed with this effect that the background is animated on a slightly different plane, adding to the 3d illusion. Isn't this part of the KB effect? - JeffJonez (talk) 15:09, 15 May 2008 (UTC)

No, I think this is called Parallax scrolling 217.109.185.32 (talk)
The parallax scrolling article mainly describes the background moving slower than the foreground in pans... like when the mountains moving slower than the road in a Road Runner cartoon. What Ken Burns likes to do is zoom in on a person in a picture while the background of that picture does not zoom as much, the splitting of the photograph into foreground/background layers is more striking when done on old photographs rather than in animation because it is not expected. I suppose the concept of "parallax" applies there as well, but the samples at parallax scrolling do not contain any zooms and samples on this article do not contain any parallax effects. DavidRF (talk) 14:48, 30 June 2009 (UTC)

The effect..[edit]

It would be nice if the article actually mentioned what the effect is.. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.217.22.145 (talk) 01:23, 30 March 2011 (UTC)

Software[edit]

Here another open source software which claims to produce Ken Burns effect out of a selection of still images: http://www.photofilmstrip.org/ Rslemos (talk) 14:08, 17 April 2011 (UTC)

It would be nice to add a more robust list of software/scripts that are useful for creating this effect. --Dylan k (talk) 15:01, 4 September 2013 (UTC)

Nicer still, from a knowledge store and propagation for the ages perspective, would be an exposition of the mathematics that go into a software implementation. Zooming in a fixed number of pixels per frame doesn't work; it "accellerates" exponentially as you zoom in, e.g. A logarithmic algorithm is needed. Panning horizontally without zooming, however, requires a linear progression. The rub for me (I've made my own implementations of this) comes when panning horizontally while simultaneously zooming in or out by some amount. My math skills appear to be a bit too rusty to easily derive what I suspect should be a compact and neat formula, but I'm working at it. --Kbh3rdtalk 15:16, 16 September 2013 (UTC)

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External links modified[edit]

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Relationship to Rostrum camera[edit]

This article has a very close relationship to Rostrum camera. There's a argument for merging these two articles, although perhaps a knowledgable editor might start by adding cross-references between these two articles instead? There also appears to be some British (rostrum) vs. American (Burns) cultural / film industry separation. Andrew Oakley (talk) 13:26, 22 August 2018 (UTC)

  • Well, the Ken Burns effect is created using a rostrum camera (or today, with software), but that's just one of the uses of the camera. Merging is not necessary since there are wikilinks between the two articles. --Janke | Talk 06:06, 23 August 2018 (UTC)