Talk:Lübke English

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It should be noted that "Equal goes it loose" is not documented at all and is probably an invention by the editors of the German weekly "Der Spiegel" (according to a former member of its editorial staff). Please refer to the German version of the article for sources. ––––

It is known, that former German Bundespäsident Lübke spoke a rather basic English. However the word "Lübke English" does not at all exist in German (even though the Hamburger Abendblatt may have used it once). I therefore strongly suggest, that this artcle be deleted -- Christoph (German) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 95.115.96.200 (talk) 16:36, 24 January 2010 (UTC)

Of course the expression "Lübke English" exists in German. Basically everyone knows it. Nulli (talk) 07:33, 2 July 2010 (UTC)

It should be noted that Heinrich Lübke, who never was a great orator, suffered from a serious illness during the approximately last 2 or 3 years of his presicency which made it hard for him to speak any language well. His German was deteriorating as well. --Purodha Blissenbach (talk) 23:18, 15 November 2010 (UTC)

Denglish[edit]

The suggestion to merge this article with Denglish is sheer nonsense, imho. There is no relation between mixing English and pseudo-English tems into German, and the mistranslations yielded by 1:1 translation attempts. --Purodha Blissenbach (talk) 23:18, 15 November 2010 (UTC)

Lübkes German[edit]

Here are two incidents attributed, correctly or not, to Heinrich Lübke speaking German:

  1. On a state visit somewhere in Africa, the initial sentences of a public speech: "Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren, liebe Neger, ..." ([formally worded] Ladies and Gentlemen, [familiar wording] dear negroes,...)
  2. Holding a speech in public: "... while this would make one laugh, (turns concept paper over) hahaha, we shall not follow this trait."

--Purodha Blissenbach (talk) 18:29, 16 November 2010 (UTC)