Talk:Laughing Man (Ghost in the Shell)

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Cyberbrain Schlerosis[edit]

Should it be mentioned that the Laughing Man has CS? I remember that he said that he did in the last episode, and it seems important pertaining towards the plotline (since he originally kidnapped Serrano to get him to reveal the truth about the Murai vaccine and how the nanomachines were ineffective against CS). --M45k3d N1Nj4 G4R0 04:39, 4 October 2006 (UTC)


Futhermore did his CS play a part in the spread of the LaughingMan phenomenon?

71.86.87.131 (talk) 05:57, 8 February 2008 (UTC)Alucard52177

Did he actually say he had it? All I remember is him showing the huge number of ports on his head and saying he was worried about it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 172.209.209.183 (talk) 16:33, 4 May 2008 (UTC)

Original Laughing man[edit]

Shouldn't it be noted that the hacker wasn't technically the first laughing man? He said that he found a email on the internet in which someone was trying to blackmail Serano Genomics, which spurred him on to kidnap the CEO. Basically he was just a standalone himself.

And there doesn't seem to be any clear reference to the other stand-alone laughing men.

I would do it myself, but I'd probably ruin it.

"Phonies"[edit]

In the article, it states that the laughing man references "phonies." Although I did notice this myself, subtitles and dubs are not always representational of the original Japanese script. Can someone clarify that the original Japanese text matches the Japanese translation of The Catcher in the Rye?

Salinger and Japan[edit]

It really kills me, that Japan loves Salinger so much. I mean Ghost in the shell has the Laughing man, and Kare no Kano has Miyazawa pretending to read 'Nine Stories' (I think, I know it's one of his books.). I wonder if it's a weird fad or fan worship of one of America's greatest writers. OR maybe they're just a bunch of phonies racking in the dough. If anybody finds some more references, I'd like to know. Anyway, I'm just a J.D. fan who likes anime and all.

You don't really think that it's so important that Japan supposedly loves Salinger, right? It's their choice if they want to do it, and I, personally, can't think of any author they could have chosen who deserved the honour more. After all, in certain places, Salinger is considered a danger, a crime, and something to be hid and read under the cover of night. Now, that's a crime, isn't it?
Of course, I'm rambling, so, it's a pleasure to meet you, Mr(S?). Fan. Welcome to Wikipedia! ~Upton
You sound just like Holden! NewYorkStyledCheesecakes! (talk) 10:57, 20 April 2010 (UTC)
Aren't both animes made by Production IG? It may be a case of the same team working on both so obviously similar motifs appear
I personally think it is because of the sort of angst that is a common thread in Salinger's stuff (I mean, look at the Laughing Man's catch-phrase!), and Salinger himself- how could his seclusion have made him any less fascinating to them--Maru (talk) Contribs 18:37, 22 December 2005 (UTC)

Alright, first off, Kare No Kano was made by GAINAX. Angst and all could very well be the reason. Another Salinger reference is in the Ghost in the Shell episode: ESCAPE FROM. Where the story, "The Secret Goldfish" is mentioned. "The Secret Goldfish" is a short story also mentioned in "The Catcher in The Rye" written by Holden's big brother, Buddy. But- I'm just a J.D. fan who likes anime and all.

Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles. You’ll learn from them — if you want to. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It’s a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn’t education. It’s history. It’s poetry.

I think that the reason JD Salinger was an inspiration for the people who worked on Ghost in the Shell, was because Masamune Shirow, the creator, doesn't want to be in the public at all, not unlike JD Salinger. Masamune Shirow isn't even his real name.
NOTE: Above poster(s) would you please sign your posts RuediiX 22:04, 6 March 2007 (UTC)
You don't expect the result of a Stand Alone Complex to actually sign their name do you? Just saying, is all.They're not going to say shit. 142.162.137.27 23:35, 27 April 2007 (UTC)
Salinger is a little unusual. His writing always seemed so morbid, angry and sad, but the fact was that was an expression of how the without expressing such feelings we can't feel happiness inside. I find a lot of my fellow Americans can't seem to understand his work. This is a commonplace problem in modern society, and I wonder if this is what truely inspired the use of these references. RuediiX 22:04, 6 March 2007 (UTC)
I'm Canadian, a Newfie in fact, but I'm just hoping I understand his work. If a Canadian counts, I'm not saying it does, but I'm pretty sure I'm right. Although...I have no idea if I entirely understand it...like I said. Your frustrations I understand at least.

142.162.137.27 00:04, 28 April 2007 (UTC)

i'm sorry, i dont get salinger at all. i read catcher in the rye and thought it was one of the most negative books i have ever read, with little or no story line. i know its supposedly about a coming of age, but there are far better american writers out there who write about similar themes. I do really like the quote used for the laughing man logo, but i think it seems more apt and meaningful while kusanagi muses over it than when holden in the book just comes out with it. sorry, no offence meant to any hardcore jd fans, but just saying i dont understand. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.108.73.47 (talk) 14:59, 2 November 2007 (UTC) \

O.K. Here we go. Is it not possible that Salinger's fame in japan is a Stand Alone Complex. Bear with me here. GitS writers love him ,obviously, but the question is; did Salinger's Japanese fame come as a result of this or did the writers pick up on something growing in the Japanese culture that reminded them of Salinger's dark literary style, and knowing that, chose him for there experiment in Stand Alone Complexes?

just a thought 71.86.87.131 (talk) 05:55, 8 February 2008 (UTC)Alucard5217771.86.87.131 (talk)

Logo - who designed it?[edit]

I remember reading in a issue of NEO an interview with the man who designed the Laughing Man logo. I think it was the man behind Terratag but I can't remember for certain, does anyone else know? --GracieLizzie 10:01, 7 February 2006 (UTC)

Yep - it was Paul Nicholson of Terratag. http://www.otakunews.com/article.php?story=201 --Crispy 11:03, 25 February 2006 (UTC)

He also designed a lot of other logos throughout the show, and the logo for the individual eleven/particulist eleven of the 2nd gig, if anyone wants to add that as well.

Gives hope for us weeaboos!

I know it sure as hell filled me with hope. It's kind of ironical though, the most iconic image from the show didn't even come from a Japanese mind. Although there's nothing wrong with either or, but it's still interesting.

142.162.137.27 23:25, 27 April 2007 (UTC)

Did someone just say "weeaboo?"
'cause I think I just heard someone say "weeaboo." –Pomte 00:33, 28 April 2007 (UTC)

"logo is retooled for the fictional Starchild Coffee"[edit]

i thought he got his logo from the starchild coffee, would anyone confirm which existed 1st? -Q

Well, isn't that the entire point of the series? Something without an origin, a Stand Alone Complex. It would make sense if the phonies used the Laughing Man to sell overpriced coffee though, haha.

err, my question was did Laughing Man used an overpriced coffee logo instead of the other way around as suggested in the article... the comment doesn't appear to address the question at all because in the discussed case, the coffee is the original... -Q

Well, I would have to say it's a statement that even the in wanting to hide his identity, the perpetrator of the acts was being a bit of a phony himself, and acknowledging that. Sort of like those punk rock songs about selling out. I know it sounds a little weird but bare with me, he was stating that everyone was a phony, including himself. He hated the fact that he was a phony, but there was nothing he could do about it. This is why he plastered everything over with the composite logo. At least, that's my take. --RuediiX 22:36, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

His name as the "Chief"[edit]

In Japanese Aoi does not mean Hollyhock, it means Blue, as in the colour of the paint he used, the colour of his hoodie (or at least the hoodie the Major wore when she impersonated him),and the colour of his Laughing Man logo.

I've only seen the Japanese version of GitS, so apologies beforehand. In the last episode, Motoko hinted that the Laughing Man might be a female. As she picked up the red hunting cap, she said something that roughly translates to "Indeed, not a Laughing MAN". Also, the Japanese name Aoi, is a lot more common as a girl's name, though, one might argue that it is a unisex name (along the lines of names like "Makoto" or "Kaoru"). --Kimon wataru 17:20, 3 November 2006 (UTC)

I just took it as referring to how he was so young and more a boy than a man. --Gwern (contribs) 20:02, 3 November 2006 (UTC)
In that episode she referring to the fact that she was planning to pose as The Laughing Man to get something done that was on both of their agendas, but she wanted to know for herself, not stand from the sidelines and get the media's view. RuediiX 22:15, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

Another possible hint would be during a scene at Episode 22. When The Laughing Man synchronizes his memories with Motoko. The body shape from the x-ray camera pan of the Laughing Man (in blue) and Motoko (in red) are distinguishable from one another. And if you freeze frame the scene, you might notice that The Laughing Man has a small bulge around the chest and a more feminine built. I have a screen capture of that. How do I link image here? Sorry, I am a wikipedia newbie... Kimon wataru 13:01, 4 November 2006 (UTC)

Chief is the name of the person who tells stories of The Laughing Man in the story The Laughing Man. I have a feeling this is the reference. Especially with the Catchers mitt and all. However, the Chief's exploits are much like the true story. RuediiX 22:15, 6 March 2007 (UTC)



I'd a have to agree with the statement above. It seems like, in this thread marked "His name as Chief." There is relative little in the way of that issue. Speaking Japanese, having done my thesis on Salinger, and knowing GITS like the back of my hand, I think it's worth mentioning. Mainly, my issue is with his name being cited as "Leader" instead of Chief. As yet another example of wikipedia's almost comical levels of inconsistency, he's called "Chief" in one paragraph, and "Leader" in the one that precedes it. I know how wiki generally takes the literal Japanese translation as priority over the English dub, for good reason. However, since there are almost never exact literal translations, in this instance, I believe that it's relevant. The word used for "Leader" in Japanese, could most definitely be translated as "Chief." Obviously, further evidence is the English dub overtly calling him "Chief" and only thus after. Most importantly, as said by the dude before, the "Chief" is the protagonist within the protagonist story, in the original "Laughing Man" short story, which the entire GITS SaC is based on (Specifically, the episode in question, which has multiple baseball references and other corollaries directly to the original Laughing Man story.) And yes, I am aware of the inherent irony of us talking about the laughing man's damn name, on the net, just like in Chat Chat Chat! We are all phonies!!!

I'd also like to point out that in the book One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, which takes place in a mental hospital (not unlike the facility shown in episode 11), the point of view is from a man called the "Chief" who pretends to be a deaf-mute. Thought it was relevant. TheShadowZero (talk) 08:39, 12 July 2010 (UTC)

Merge[edit]

Consensus was do not merge, removing {{mergeto}} template. --Lowg 04:14, 8 September 2006 (UTC)

I don't think a "consensus" was found to not merge this article, but it is fairly large, and for the time being we didn't merge the larger character articles. So it was just a simple decision, not really a consensus. -- Ned Scott 04:18, 8 September 2006 (UTC)
Well, in any case, I just wanted to notify the editors why I removed the tag. Thanks. Lowg 04:25, 8 September 2006 (UTC)

Request for a link to the image moving[edit]

I am in dire need of this link and I know a few people who would appreciate the help. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.45.26.39 (talkcontribs)

You do realize that what you wrote made absolutely no sense, right? --Gwern (contribs) 01:13, 2 November 2006 (UTC)


You mean link to the moving logo? Check out the Australian site here http://www.ghostintheshell.com.au it's in flash but at least you can see it. --Ethikos 15:09, 5 November 2006 (UTC)
If you do a search on http://www.deviantart.com for Laughing Man you'll find quite a few full motion reproductions. Not all of them are accurate, but many are very close. This is an excellent one done in flash. http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/41729209/?qo=46&q=laughing+man&qh=boost%3Apopular+age_sigma%3A24h+age_scale%3A5 Phereion 09:26, 25 November 2006 (UTC)

Logo Origin - Laughing man logo = Cyber brain interface?[edit]

Episode 9 which is set in the chat room features interface consoles on the table for each user which closely resemble the laughing-man logo itself; which is in the background. These 'cyber-brain interfaces' also appear in other episodes and are similar in shape and have a blue circle inside the white border.

In the Tachikoma follow up to this episode the Tachikoma holds up a RED interface and says "You know, the round shape of this interface reminds me of something".

Since the Tachkoma shorts always address the episode it seems this supports the theory that the design of the cyber brain interface is related to the design of the laughing man logo and this is being hinted by the producers. --Ethikos 15:29, 5 November 2006 (UTC)

Yes, I suspected this as another item in the composite as well.

Additionally, I suspect the baseball hat comes from is actual desired title "The catcher in the rye"

How would The Laughing Man have surfaced as the name without inside information as well? How would they have known of his nickname among his friends of "chief?" RuediiX 21:57, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

[edit]

initial image was Image:Gits-laughing-man.jpeg .In case that you have to revert back.the notch was mising to from the old image.--Pierson's Puppeteer 00:04, 6 February 2007 (UTC)

150px NonFreeImageRemoved.svg
Maybe I'm being oblivious, but what's the difference other than the fact that the new one has spinning text? It's a better and more appropriate image anyway. Pomte 01:09, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
Eventually, I'm going to replace this image with a better one (for example, in the present image, both the font and the text itself are wrong; it should be in an Impact-like font and read: I thought what I'd do was, I'd pretend I was one of those deaf-mutes). Tony Myers 20:37, 6 February 2007 (UTC)
Maybe you shouldn't.You'l lose your time. [1]--Pierson's Puppeteer 21:11, 8 February 2007 (UTC)
Bah! I have tons of time. Tony Myers 20:00, 10 February 2007 (UTC)
i don't wan't to be an ass.But the proportions are wrong.Not,that i can fix it.--87.65.147.54 02:35, 21 February 2007 (UTC)

https://gist.github.com/johan/1066590?short_path=cf9095a — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.165.46.221 (talk) 07:01, 3 June 2016 (UTC)

...or should I.[edit]

Referring to the episode Portraze:

. . . or should I.

My impression of this statement was that upon witnessing what he saw in the center, he was no longer feeling as content as he was about letting the world feast on it's bad karma of it's own squabbles, but he felt he may actually want to do something about it, and become the Laughing Man they portrayed him as, without his decision.

In the end of the episode where he finds he is doing more harm than good he leaves a catcher's mitt, and everyone has seemingly forgotten about him except the kids who forget all the facts, not his existence.

He leaves one thing for the kids to remember him by, the lefty's catcher's mitt displayed as a piece of modern art. On it is written in blue paint the famous ending quote from Catcher in the Rye. Stating the Zen statement that he played a move in the game by not playing any more moves in the game, and he now understands that and must learn to continue this vastly disabling, yet incredibly strong card to his advantage, instead of just letting it fester in spite as it was.

There are two other points where he appears. One, in Chat Chat Chat. Also there is a person in that center, who points out the server. The person enters and leaves through a map of a library, the same library as The Laughing Man's employment.

One final note, his affinity for that center, and the resemblance of him in the photo from the final episode, in reference to the suspected physical attribute tendencies towards people with autism-related savant syndrome.

RuediiX 21:53, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

What was the full quote on the catcher's mit? 207.69.137.36 15:19, 6 April 2007 (UTC)

Red hunting caps, and GoSeeBanafish[edit]

In the second gig, (SPOILERSPOILERSPOILER) when you see Motoko as a kid. she's wearing a red hunting cap. What gets me is, that it's actually backwards too. And of course, you can tell that Aoi's the Laughing Man from the fact you can see that red hunting cap in the episode where he poses as an interviewer. Then boom, laughing man face'd. Kid Kusanagi's hat is in the Motoko Kusanagi article here on wikipedia of course. And GoSeeBanafish isn't added here, that's in the trivia of the main Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex article.

Someone add this as I'm quite illiterate.

142.162.137.27 23:32, 27 April 2007 (UTC)

RE: Salinger references[edit]

I think that someone with more editing experince than I should edit the section "Salinger references" so that it doesn't redundantly use 'Another is....' It is a simple change that would increase the article's quality. It's no big deal and I'll change it to the best of my ability if needed. Lowtech42 03:21, 28 May 2007 (UTC)

RE: RE:

so what i thought id do is id be one of those anonymous hackers....and i didnt think twice...lol

71.86.87.131 (talk) 09:14, 8 February 2008 (UTC)Alucard52177

Fair use rationale for Image:Starchild Coffee company logo.png[edit]

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Image:Starchild Coffee company logo.png is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images uploaded after 4 May, 2006, and lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.BetacommandBot 07:31, 6 June 2007 (UTC)

American English or British English?[edit]

It doesn't really matter which but it would be better to pick one over the other instead of half and half. Its late and the policy/guideline to quote this by is avoiding my mind... akuyumeTC 08:23, 12 June 2007 (UTC)

British (or REAL) english as its about a british made design. Terrasidius (talk) 21:47, 31 March 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:TheLaughingMan.jpg[edit]

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Image:TheLaughingMan.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

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BetacommandBot 04:41, 3 July 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Sun flower society logo-3.png[edit]

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Image:Sun flower society logo-3.png is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images uploaded after 4 May, 2006, and lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot 04:54, 3 July 2007 (UTC)

Is spoiler warning inappropriate?[edit]

Seeing as it's been undone there: [[2]] I really thought that the whole article can ruin much of the fun from watching the series.

Sure, it's a loose call, that someone would stumble upon the article and carelessly read on, but still. :/ 85.141.245.254 12:20, 18 August 2007 (UTC)

Homebrew spoiler tags are against the guideline at WP:SPOIL. There's a tag for that purpose. Kuronue 19:07, 18 August 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Laughing man big 2.png[edit]

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Image:Laughing man big 2.png is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images uploaded after 4 May, 2006, and lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot 18:41, 3 October 2007 (UTC)


Link to Cafepress Shop Removed[edit]

Removed this external link:

  • [www.cafepress.com/trading_co Laughing Man Underground Merchandise ]

As the site is clearly not official (it's a [CafePress.com|CafePress] site). It's just an attempt to get some income by abusing wikipedia's popularity. (76.204.193.62 (talk) 03:56, 18 November 2007 (UTC))

Why does the article use some poor-quality cameraphone image when a quick Google Image Search reveals much higher-quality source images of the Laughing Man logo? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.59.141.38 (talk) 04:23, 26 November 2007 (UTC)

Laughing Man's logo used as censorship method in Japan[edit]

Has anyone noticed how some Japanese blogs and news sites use the Laughing Man logo instead of pixelization to censor possibly obscene things? For example: <this is a link to Kotaku; click the external link at the bottom of the article to get to the proper page; NSFW>. I was wondering if anyone has found any reliable sources documenting this phenomenon. Axem Titanium (talk) 03:42, 13 December 2007 (UTC)

Also here, to protect anonymity; SFW. Maybe it's just Akibablog? Axem Titanium (talk) 03:44, 13 December 2007 (UTC)

Citation request for 'Lefty's Catcher's Mitt' Statement[edit]

There is a citation request for the following description in the article

He also kept a prized left-handed baseball catcher's mitt for a time with a quote from The Catcher in the Rye written on it. Ironically, while the mitt is actually real, the term "a lefty's catcher mitt" is described as being net jargon for "something people think exists, but really doesn't."

I'm not much of a Wikipedia editor, but for whoever wants to make the reference, one of the characters gives this description of the term at the end of the episode "Portraitz" in the English dub. Episode 11, I believe. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.177.164.184 (talk) 06:42, 18 January 2008 (UTC)

To whomever revised the laughing man history.[edit]

Thanks. The original one was way off. I tried and failed horribly to amend it. The new article correctly expresses the true laughing man. And not simply Aoi. delete this when received.


                                                    71.86.87.131 (talk) 09:23, 7 February 2008 (UTC)Alucard5217771.86.87.131 (talk) 09:23, 7 February 2008 (UTC)


A Gift To Launghingman's Fans[edit]

I worked on this this morning, since I couldn't find it existed. Something maybe to put up if someone wants to the main page.
--!CS-Borma (talk) 15:44, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

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    I THOUGHT WHAT I'D DO WAS, I'D PRETEND I WAS ONE OF THOSE DEAF-MUTES.   

Does it bother anyone that this image is wrong?[edit]

Anyone familiar with the series should notice that the way the logo is shown is different than the logo used in this article. The word covered up by the Starchild Coffee handle is always repeated before it appears on the other side. This was clearly meant for readability but is often omitted in current renderings. Reproducing this effect is non-negligible and is too frequently ignored. I happen to think we should have the actual logo shown on this article or perhaps just the screencap from the show. Here is some footage to compare for yourself. Teque5 (talk) 01:52, 8 June 2009 (UTC)

Missing Reference[edit]

There is one quite obvious reference that is missing from the section. When in the vocational aid centre. Togusa reads the quote from Catcher in the Rye. I believe it was written on the inside of the panel he opens. The quote from when Holden talks about how if he could, if there was nothing stopping him, he would just become one of those catchers in the rye.

I will not edit it myself as I cannot remember the exact quote. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.7.110.7 (talk) 09:26, 3 July 2010 (UTC)

Flashpoint[edit]

I think the logo used by the character Jaime Dee in the Flashpoint episode "Run, Jaime, Run" is almost certainly a reference to the Laughing Man logo. http://i51.tinypic.com/28cpsgj.jpg Should some mention of this be made in the article? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.171.242.168 (talk) 04:20, 23 July 2011 (UTC)

"Fictional Rapists" Category[edit]

The current category list for this article includes "Fictional Rapists." Is this a reference to him controlling people's cyberbrains against their will or performing illegal brain dives? I guess the latter could be considered philosophically equivalent to rape, but as far as I'm aware he never physically raped, or attempted to rape, anyone in show.

Would anyone who might be more familiar with this topic like to weigh in? I've watched the entire series, but it's been a while. Since there's no explanation in the article in itself and no mention of it (as far as I can find) in secondary literature, I'd like to remove the category unless someone has a good reason not to. --chrisFjordson (talk) 20:35, 22 April 2014 (UTC)

I am going to remove the category since it has been almost a week and no one has weighed in on the issue. If you have any concerns, please voice them here before adding the category back. --chrisFjordson (talk) 03:04, 28 April 2014 (UTC)

"Fandom tags" images[edit]

Hi! I've removed these images because there seems to be no proof to the assertion that they're used in the fandom, there's no explanation of what 'fandom tags' are, and the placement in the article (just by the references) is horrendously poor. PeterTheFourth has made few or no other edits outside this topic. 01:13, 1 June 2015 (UTC)

Removal of edits because for personal preferences is not an excuse.--j0eg0d (talk) 04:20, 1 June 2015 (UTC)
I see that you've added some sources for the use of the Laughing Man icon in the fandom. Unfortunately, all of these only relate to the left icon, which is a downsized version of the main image we already use in the article- the pixellated logo is not used in any of the sources given. As such, I have removed these images. PeterTheFourth has made few or no other edits outside this topic. 04:48, 1 June 2015 (UTC)
I realise you wish the image you contributed to remain in the wiki, J0eg0d, but you should come up with policy based reasons to include it- this edit warring to include a debatably copyright-violating image is not in the spirit of Wikipedia. PeterTheFourth has made few or no other edits outside this topic. 05:12, 1 June 2015 (UTC)

History section[edit]

(Copied over from the article)

The hacker's first appearance in the GITS: SAC storyline is six years previous to when the series started, when he assaulted the CEO of Serano Genomics in public on February 3, 2024, hiding his face from eyewitnesses and cameras with his Laughing Man logo. The Laughing Man can "steal eyes" of entire crowds in real time by hacking their visual cyber-brain implants, either to make himself appear invisible or to hide his face with the cartoon logo. He can also easily erase all records of his existence, including the memories of people with cyber-brains. Many of those who saw his face would only recall and refer to the stylized logo as depicted above, and were not able to realize anything was unusual when asked to describe his features. Togusa was one such person, as were many of the witnesses of the initial incident involving the head of Serano Genomics.
The Laughing Man has quite a fascination with The Catcher in the Rye, as if the work greatly influenced him: like that novel's main character, Holden Caulfield, he can't stand "phonies" (corrupt politicians in this case). For a time, he also kept a left-handed baseball catcher's mitt with a quote from The Catcher in the Rye written on it: "You know what I'd like to be? I mean, if I had my goddamn choice, I'd just be a catcher in the rye and all". While Aoi did indeed possess this mitt, the term "a lefty's catcher mitt" is described as being net jargon for "something people think exists, but really doesn't." For this reason, Section 9 inadvertently overlooks the only physical evidence of the Laughing Man's whereabouts and identity.
For an unknown amount of time before the storyline begins, the Laughing Man lived in the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare's Rehabilitation Center, posing as a deaf-mute in a wheelchair. He apparently revealed his ability to walk and talk to the other patients at the center, who knew him as "leader" (団長, danchō, "chief" in the English dub) and referred to his occasional periods of communication as "visits." While Togusa is investigating the center, he discovers that someone has written the famous Laughing Man logo text in a PBX cabinet. The words "or should I?" have been appended to the actual quote, signifying the doubts of his own current course of action. Realizing he is in danger of being discovered, he decides to erase all record of his existence from the center. For completeness, he replaces Togusa's memories of his face with the Laughing Man logo, and wipes the memories of his friends (who apparently not only consent to this treatment, but seem to expect it).
Following the Laughing Man's kidnapping of the head of Serano Genomics, there was a large wave of "Laughing Man"-related graffiti attacks, corporate vandalism, and extortion; broadly referred to several times as "Corporate Terrorism." He didn't strike again until six years later, but in the meantime a corrupt power cabal in the Japanese Government led by Secretary General Kaoru Yakushima used the Laughing Man's sudden appearance and apparent connection to Serano Genomics to their advantage. They carried out the aforementioned acts of corporate terrorism while using the "Laughing Man" motif, which fooled the media into thinking these acts were the Laughing Man's doing; thus subverting his motives in the process. As a result of the publicity, "The Laughing Man" logo then became something of a pop culture obsession, much to the chagrin of the actual Laughing Man. Since many used his icon and name for their own purposes, his effort to stand for and demand the truth became just one phony meaning among many. One such imitator launched an unsuccessful hacking effort to assassinate Daido, quickly followed by 39 other physical attackers. When all who were arrested showed no sign of external influence, nor any connection with the Laughing Man or his imitator, it was thought that they attempted the assassination to be a part of The Laughing Man's effort for the truth. However, the police informed the public that they were forced to carry out the attack through ghost hacking to avoid further spontaneous assassination attempts.
After the events of the Section 9 raid by the Umibozu and the last meeting with Motoko Kusanagi and Aramaki, it was discovered that Aoi, though responsible for the initial incident that made the Laughing Man a phenomenon, was not its true originator. When confronted, he confesses to have been a brash student at the time of the kidnapping, as he now prefers a more intellectual approach over his previous overzealous and radical ideals. Aoi made it a point that he never came up with the name "The Laughing Man" for himself; it was a label that the media gave based on the J.D. Salinger quote on the logo which eventually stuck. He admitted that his notorious kidnapping caper was planned after chancing upon a file in the depths of the Net detailing the extensive corruption in the corporate world. While choosing to confront Serano because of this file, he never discovered the origin, despite searching for several years. It could be said that whoever abandoned the file was in fact the "real" Laughing Man - and it is still possible that this person obtained it from someone else. Therefore, the originator of this file, and thus the identity of the original "Laughing Man," remain a mystery.
While Aramaki understands the sheer absurdity of the story, he also recognizes that the surrounding events corroborate Aoi's admissions. Since Aoi's true motives finally come to light, Aramaki takes interest in Aoi's extensive hacking skills, and offers him a position with Section 9. Though Aoi is deeply flattered by the offer, he declines; choosing to disappear from Japanese society, employed as a librarian in the National Library. Earlier in the series, Togusa theorizes that because the Laughing Man was such a superb hacker, he placed no value in digital media: it could be easily overwritten or deleted. This could explain Aoi's choice to work in a library; paper media exists in a physical state, and cannot be so easily altered or destroyed.

I have moved this section from the article as it is fully un-sourced WP:OR, if someone chooses to work on this in the future. - Knowledgekid87 (talk) 19:59, 29 September 2015 (UTC)