Talk:List of rivers of Oregon

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to do[edit]

east fork, west fork; (why doesn't it appear in one of these?: [2] [3] [4])

EncMstr 23:33, 30 October 2007 (UTC)

I have no idea why it was overlooked, except that OGN says it is sometimes called the North Fork Coos River, although the USBGN uses the name Millicoma. Strange. Katr67 03:12, 31 October 2007 (UTC)

Collapsible sections?[edit]

As this list gets longer and more complete, is there some way to make it less unwieldy? Perhaps there is some way to make the minor tributary creeks be in collapsible sections. Other ideas are welcome. Katr67 (talk) 06:07, 5 September 2008 (UTC)

Why unwieldy? Shouldn't a list of rivers (better named List of Streams) show all of them? Are you suggesting that major, middling, and minor be distinguished? —EncMstr (talk) 14:28, 5 September 2008 (UTC)
Of course it should show all of them, but maybe hide the lesser ones unless the reader wants to see them. I was thinking of the creeks, especially ones that may not be notable enough to be linked, not to disrespect Finetooth's efforts to figure out the tributary structures. I trust the Johnson Creek tributaries will eventually have articles, thanks to the efforts of Finetooth and others. I guess I'm thinking in terms of the future--if we add every creek to the tributary structure, that list is going to be long! With large indents, and thus harder to navigate. Meanwhile, I'm going to try to find any stream named a "river" on GNIS that isn't in here yet and add them. Katr67 (talk) 18:33, 5 September 2008 (UTC)
As I was adding the Alsea River tribs, I had the same thought as Katr67. Lots of these trifling streams will never have their own articles, methinks. If I keep on in this way, the list is going to become enormous. I like doing the trib structures, and I'll almost certainly do more unless I'm wrestled to the ground and told to cut it out. We might eventually end up with a complete list of all the named streams in Oregon. From doing the 40 or so miles of the Alsea, I can guarantee that a complete list will be very long indeed. I don't know what to do about it, however. I'm a neophyte when it comes to things like collapsing sections. Finetooth (talk) 21:27, 5 September 2008 (UTC)

Sources for expansion[edit]

This is a list from NOAA of flood warnings. The drop-down menus for the tributaries might give some idea which creeks might be good candidates for inclusion in the list and for articles, as they may be more notable for their "floodproneness".

A non-profit, "Protecting Natural Flows in Oregon Rivers".

Katr67 (talk) 22:34, 29 September 2008 (UTC)

State of Oregon site--"Find your watershed". Katr67 (talk) 23:12, 29 September 2008 (UTC)

List of longest rivers in the United States by state[edit]

I found this funny little list, but it doesn't have Oregon in it. Finding the info and adding it to the list might be a good afternoon's project for someone. Katr67 (talk) 22:49, 29 September 2008 (UTC)

Tables?[edit]

This seems like the awesome type of list to raise to featured status, but I'm pretty sure it won't get there unless we use tables. We should probably keep the current format of sections for an alphabetical listing and tributary structure. I hope I'm not jumping into this too fast, but here's a suggestion for how to build the tables. I'm using the Columbia and Willamette as examples.

Name Image Description References
Columbia River The Columbia River as seen from Cape Horn Trail The longest river in the Pacific Northwest, the 2,000-km Columbia flows from southeastern British Columbia south through Washington and east along the Oregon-Washington border into the Pacific Ocean. [1]
Willamette River The Willamette passing through Portland Named after a Clackamas Indian village, the Willamette flows from the Cascade foothills north through the Willamette Valley into the Columbia River in Portland. [2][3]

Feel free to list other suggestions about the table. --Jsayre64 (talk) 02:12, 7 April 2011 (UTC)

  1. ^ Lang, Bill. "Columbia River". Center for Columbia River History. Retrieved April 6, 2011.
  2. ^ Bright, William (2004). Native American Placenames of the United States. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press. p. 567. ISBN 0-8061-3576-X.
  3. ^ "Willamette River". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 28 November 1980. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
I've added a lot of mostly insignificant tribs over the past three years or so to the trib structure sublist. Almost three years ago, Katr67 (Valfontis) suggested above that the lesser streams in the sublist be hidden to make it more easily navigable. Maybe the alphabetical list of the rivers only could be turned into a table like the one you are suggesting, and the non-alphabetical list with all the tribs could become a separate article with collapsing boxes. However, even eliminating the creeks from the alphabetical list leaves close to 200 rivers, by my rough count. Would a table with 200 rows be practical? Finetooth (talk) 03:38, 7 April 2011 (UTC)
I support that idea to reduce clutter. If readers see a 200-row table as a burden, it might help to split into alphabetical sections for rivers A-C, D-F, and so on. That's pretty much the style in List of parks in Portland, Oregon, which received general support. --Jsayre64 (talk) 04:14, 7 April 2011 (UTC)
Sounds good to me if you want to undertake it, but others might want to weigh in too. Finetooth (talk) 04:46, 7 April 2011 (UTC)
I'm working on a collapsible items solution. No idea how long that might take, or if it is feasible.
A table would be appropriate if, besides the stream name, it has useful highlights:
Name photo length max flow min flow drop dams color sub/urban description references
Columbia River The Columbia River as seen from Cape Horn Trail 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi)[1] 750000 cfs[1] 32 cfs[1] 8,000 metres (26,000 ft)[1] 121[1] mostly brown 2.17%[1] The longest river in the Pacific Northwest, from southeastern British Columbia south through Washington and east along the Oregon-Washington border into the Pacific Ocean. [2]
Willamette River The Willamette passing through Portland 200 kilometres (120 mi)[1] 75000 cfs[1] 8 cfs[1] 2,000 metres (6,600 ft)[1] 0.5[1] mostly blue 11.7%[1] Named after a Clackamas Indian village, the Willamette flows from the Cascade foothills north through the Willamette Valley into the Columbia River in Portland. [3][4]
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Made up number for illustrative purposes
  2. ^ Lang, Bill. "Columbia River". Center for Columbia River History. Retrieved April 6, 2011.
  3. ^ Bright, William (2004). Native American Placenames of the United States. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press. p. 567. ISBN 0-8061-3576-X.
  4. ^ "Willamette River". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. 28 November 1980. Retrieved April 6, 2011. 
EncMstr (talk) 06:26, 7 April 2011 (UTC)
Ah. I forgot about those important statistics. The table looks pretty good to me. I'll mess around in my sandbox in search of how to collapse tables, and I hope I'll discover something. Jsayre64 (talk) 14:32, 7 April 2011 (UTC)

──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Another option is to copy the table format in List of longest streams of Oregon, a featured list. Or maybe we could combine your suggested format with that one, so long as the table doesn't become too wide. --Jsayre64 (talk) 00:37, 8 April 2011 (UTC)

I doubt it's possible to collapse sections of tables. This was, if I understood correctly, not what you had in mind, EncMstr, and this was a problematic result. Maybe we could ask at WP:VPT? --Jsayre64 (talk) 15:12, 17 April 2011 (UTC)
It is indeed time to ask as VPT; I've asked at Template talk:Collapsible bulletlist and Template talk:Collapsible list. At the former, someone identified the flaw of using that template and said they would look into it. I haven't seen anything more yet. If you don't beat me to it, I'll ask at WP:VPT. —EncMstr (talk) 00:25, 18 April 2011 (UTC)
Ha, I beat you! With queries now in three places, we'll probably get a response soon. Jsayre64 (talk) 02:06, 18 April 2011 (UTC)
I'd suggest adding/changing some columns:
Name Photo Length Max. flow Min. flow Source Mouth Drop Number of dams Color Sub/urban Description References
Columbia River The Columbia River as seen from Cape Horn Trail 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) 750000 cfs 32 cfs Columbia Lake, British Columbia, 50°13′00″N 115°51′00″W / 50.21667°N 115.85000°W / 50.21667; -115.85000 (Columbia River (source)) Pacific Ocean, 46°14′39″N 124°03′29″W / 46.24417°N 124.05806°W / 46.24417; -124.05806 (Columbia River (mouth)) 8,000 metres (26,000 ft) 121 Mostly brown 2.17% The longest river in the Pacific Northwest, from southeastern British Columbia south through Washington and east along the Oregon-Washington border into the Pacific Ocean. [1][2][3]
Willamette River The Willamette passing through Portland 200 kilometres (120 mi) 75000 cfs 8 cfs Near Eugene, 44°01′23″N 123°01′25″W / 44.02306°N 123.02361°W / 44.02306; -123.02361 (Willamette River (source)) Near Portland, 45°39′10″N 122°45′53″W / 45.65278°N 122.76472°W / 45.65278; -122.76472 (Willamette River (mouth)) 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) 0.5 Mostly blue 11.7% Named after a Clackamas Indian village, the Willamette flows from the Cascade foothills north through the Willamette Valley into the Columbia River in Portland. [4][5]
  1. ^ "Columbia Lake". Natural Resources Canada. Retrieved January 31, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Columbia River". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. November 28, 1980. Retrieved August 5, 2010. 
  3. ^ Lang, Bill. "Columbia River". Center for Columbia River History. Retrieved April 6, 2011.
  4. ^ "Willamette River". Geographic Names Information System (GNIS). United States Geological Survey. November 28, 1980. Retrieved August 6, 2010. 
  5. ^ Bright, William (2004). Native American Placenames of the United States. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press. p. 567. ISBN 0-8061-3576-X.

--Jsayre64 (talk) 16:11, 18 April 2011 (UTC)

According to what I've heard so far at VPT, this type of table can't really be collapsed; only this. So I'd say we have a section in the list with the above format for the longer/larger rivers, and a separate section with the collapsible tables for the tributary structures of those rivers. Besides, it's unlikely that there would be enough information available to use the above format for all the tribs. Does this seem reasonable? Jsayre64 (talk) 22:53, 18 April 2011 (UTC)
Below is an example of how we can format the tributary structures, from what I heard at VPT. It's a pretty nasty code, but if we can figure it out I think it's the best option for the tributary listings.
Header
Cell 1 Cell 2
Header
Cell heading
Cell 1-1 Cell 1-2 Cell 1-3
Cell 2-1 Cell 2-2 Cell 2-3
Cell heading
Cell 1-1 Cell 1-2 Cell 1-3
Cell 2-1 Cell 2-2 Cell 2-3
Rivers and stuff
By some grouping By some other grouping
* Top level
  • Level 2
  • Level 2
* Top Level
:* Level 2
  • Level 3
  • Level 2
  • Level 2
* Top level
  • Level 2
  • Level 2
* Top Level
:* Level 2
  • Level 3
  • Level 2
  • Level 2

--Jsayre64 (talk) 23:05, 19 April 2011 (UTC)

That is certainly an option. The grunginess of that approach can be moved into templates, if it isn't already somewhere. I still am looking for a Javascript-based approach which will have several advantages, not the least of which is that one control can expand all minor tributaries, I think an important feature. —EncMstr (talk) 23:34, 19 April 2011 (UTC)
Well, guess what? Bility (talk · contribs) just posted on my talk page to show me some templates to replace the code. See what he/she posted. Jsayre64 (talk) 02:41, 20 April 2011 (UTC)

Here's an example of what can be set up with the new templates: