Talk:Nudge (book)

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cited[edit]

Behavioral Economics Foils an Obama Tax Cut? by Drake Bennett in November 10, 2011 Bloomberg BusinessWeek "Nudge Not: New research finds that a trendy economic theory backfired on the Obama Administration. Or did it?"

In 2002 one of its godfathers, the psychologist Daniel Kahneman, won the Nobel Prize in Economics, and the years since have seen a growing list of best-sellers (Malcolm Gladwell’s Blink, Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein’s Nudge, Dan Ariely’s Predictably Irrational) describing and drawing on its findings. Unlike neoclassical economists, behavioral economists don’t see people as rational actors coolly weighing costs and benefits. Behaviorists argue instead that people rely on a set of instincts, biases, and cognitive shortcuts to make decisions, which often lead them to choices they come to regret.

141.218.36.56 (talk) 22:12, 22 November 2011 (UTC)

See Cognitive bias, Predictably Irrational, Blink (book), Neoclassical economics, Behavioral economics, Rational choice theory, Instinct. Cognitive miser, and Category:Cognition. 99.181.147.59 (talk) 06:26, 23 November 2011 (UTC)
More formally, see Cost–benefit analysis. 99.190.86.93 (talk) 04:23, 2 December 2011 (UTC)

NPR references?[edit]

There were many NPR stories on nudges, especially in 2013 - and the article would benefit from those references and examples. http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/03/29/175710393/fruit-not-fries-lunchroom-makeovers-nudge-kids-toward-better-choices rhyre (talk) 18:40, 1 June 2013 (UTC)