Talk:Ontario Superior Court of Justice

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External link[edit]

I fail to see why an external link to a website about the Charter is relevant to a page about the Superior Court of Justice (other than the fact that the Court, like almost every other Canadian court, has the power to make Charter decisions). A Charter website should, naturally, be listed at the Charter of Rights and Freedoms page, not a page about a specific court. Therefore, I'm removing the link. 142.108.145.91 19:53, 12 November 2007 (UTC)

Court of Ontario[edit]

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice is a creation under the Ontario Courts of Justice Act, R.S.O. c. C-43 (and is a continuation of the former Ontario Court (Gen. Div.) as per the Act). However, at least since the Courts of Justice Act has come into force, there is no such thing as the 'Court of Ontario', and the Superior Court of Justice is not a 'division' of such an entity. Although all three Ontario Courts (Court of Justice, Superior Court of Justice, and Court of Appeal) are created under the same Act, they are three seperate entities. I have therefore removed the reference to the court being a "division of the Court of Ontario".142.108.145.91 (talk) 21:14, 5 December 2007 (UTC)

Looking at the legislation, I believe that there is, technically, an entity called "Court of Ontario". See section 10 of the Courts of Justice Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. C.43. Thus I am going to undo the edits made by 142.108.145.91. --Mathew5000 (talk) 09:10, 6 December 2007 (UTC)
I created an article for Court of Ontario. If you look at the table of contents of the Courts of Justice Act you can see that the Act establishes two courts: the Court of Appeal for Ontario (Part I of the Act) and the Court of Ontario (Part II of the Act). To be precise, these two courts are "continued" by the Act. Section 10 of the Act makes it clear that the Superior Court of Justice is a division of the Court of Ontario. See also the table in section 1.1 of the Act, setting out "Court of Ontario" as the new name of what was known up to 1999 as the Ontario Court of Justice. The Court of Ontario is also mentioned in subsection 52(4) of the Act. --Mathew5000 (talk) 09:36, 6 December 2007 (UTC)
You are absolutely right, and I was wrong. I must have missed s. 10 of the Act. It's a term that has never come up in any legal proceeding. However, I have some comments regarding the Court of Ontario article on it's talk page. 142.108.145.91 (talk) 18:06, 6 December 2007 (UTC)
I had never heard of it either, until today. It's rather odd that such a major court "exists" legally but is not acknowledged in practice. --Mathew5000 (talk) 19:18, 6 December 2007 (UTC)
It is strictly a political not a practical creation.The Court of Ontario is the result of an election promise to rationalize the courts and have one trial court in Ontario. Technically this was accomplished by the creation of the former Ontario Court of Justice, now known as the Court of Ontario. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.211.15.216 (talk) 17:32, 16 August 2008 (UTC)

Project tag ratings[edit]

I have changed the importance rating of this article from Low to "Mid", and will do the same for the Ont.Court of Justice and the Court of Ontario. PKT (talk) 17:27, 9 February 2008 (UTC)

The Court of Ontario is the result of an election promise to rationalize the courts and have one trial court in Ontario. Technically this was accomplished by the creation of the former Ontario Court of Justice, now known as the Court of Ontario. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.211.15.216 (talk) 17:27, 16 August 2008 (UTC)