Talk:Outer ear

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Anatomy (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Anatomy, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Anatomy on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article has not yet been associated with a particular anatomical discipline.
 

Misleading[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

It's phrased in a misleading way as it is. In fact, the only mechanism that is selectively amplifying for sounds around 3kHz is the ear canal, and that only amplifies incoming sound by a factor of two. The total amplification can be up to a factor 100, but that is due to the middle ears functions (the tympani having a 15 times larger area than the oval window, and the lever effect from the ossicles which is like 3x). I'll try to change it to something better later if noone does it before me. --GustenNyberg (talk) 17:48, 13 February 2008 (UTC)

Just saw in the middle ear-article a reference to an article that states that the ossicles probably are a bit selective as well: "Between 0.1 and 1 kHz it is approximately 2, it then rises to around 5 at 2 kHz and then falls off steadily above this frequency.". Doesn't change my point though. --GustenNyberg (talk) 17:48, 13 February 2008 (UTC)

Sorry for spamming this discussion page. I did a more solid research though and found out I was wrong. The external auditory meatus can actually "amplify" sound up to 20 dB (100x)! Here's the reference that convinced me: "Changes in external ear resonance after 3 types of surgery in the patients with chronic otitis media", Yang-Sun Cho MDa, In-Seok Seo MDa, Hyo-Chang Woo MSa, Myung-Koo Kang MDa, Won-Ho Chung MDa and Sung Hwa Hong MDa. Here's the link to a physics-page that had me confused: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/sound/earsens.html. --GustenNyberg (talk) 18:48, 13 February 2008 (UTC)


The discussion above is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

Miscellaneous comments[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

Not sure I agree with this wording: "This tube *amplifies* frequencies in the range 3 kHz to 12 kHz". This is a resonance phenomenon. There is no active contribution of energy to the sound pressure as suggested by the word "amplifies".--mcrema.

I've heard that the earlobe never stops growing. Can anyone confirm or deny this? --Smajie

According to the most extreem show by animal planet's The Most Extreme, the earlobe does not stop growing. --Justinphd 15:45, 6 November 2006

Does anyone know what the name is of the part of the outer ear that is made up of folds of cartilage and skin? I know it's two words.-Kristina


The discussion above is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

Improper infobox[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

I think this is not the correct infobox. What we are looking for is {{Infobox anatomy}} Circeus 19:42, 6 March 2006 (UTC)

Thanks for catching that. It is now fixed. --Arcadian 21:42, 6 March 2006 (UTC)

The outer part of that ear is called pinna or auricle. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.68.56.232 (talk) 14:04, 14 October 2007 (UTC) win radio


The discussion above is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

citing[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

The first paragraph of this entry seems to be lifted from a textbook. It is not cited, and I wrote which text book it was. Either you can delete it or cite it properly. I'm not familiar with how Wikipedia deals with this so I just wrote it right on the page. I did not want to delete it without giving reason.However, I found this discussion after I changed the page, so I realize I should have probably done it through the talk page. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 137.99.180.12 (talk) 02:12, 6 April 2010 (UTC)


The discussion above is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

Proposed merge with Intrinsic muscles of external ear[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

Needless to have a separate article when the parent article (outer ear) is so sparse, would improve readability and quality of article to display it in one spot, instead of needlessly fragmenting the content. Could be re-expanded at a later date if necessary. LT910001 (talk) 23:24, 10 April 2014 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done. With no objections, I've performed these mergers. --Tom (LT) (talk) 23:10, 27 October 2014 (UTC)

The discussion above is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

Proposed merge with Auricular muscles[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.

See above LT910001 (talk) 23:24, 10 April 2014 (UTC)


The discussion above is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made on the appropriate discussion page. No further edits should be made to this discussion.