Talk:Parabolic trajectory

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stub[edit]

How is this a stub, it is pretty long.Jamesrules90 (talk) 18:53, 10 March 2010 (UTC)

Fixes[edit]

I just added the section on Barker's equation (kinda like Kepler's equation but for parabolic orbits). I've noticed that in addition to the page not containing sources, it is also a little repetitive, specifically with the identifications of variables. I'm going to try to clean this up a bit and maybe try to flesh it out. Any help with proofreading, formatting, sources or whatever would be great. Jaxcp3 (talk) 21:00, 4 August 2012 (UTC)

Warning: Barker's equation, as listed at the time of this comment, is incorrect. Do some dimensional analysis on it to see this: left side is a difference of time, which means it is measured in {second}. Right side is a paranthesis of sums of tangents (adimensional) and a square root of {meter^3 * second^(-2) / meter^3}. Which means the right side is measured in {second^(-1)}. This page gives a Barker's equation that is similar to the one here but you'll notice the square root (measured in {second^-1}) multiplies the difference of times there. Bringing it to the other side of the equation requires that it be turned over. Unless someone else fixes this first, I will do so tomorrow, once I learn more about editing wiki eqs.89.137.184.25 (talk) 12:06, 28 May 2013 (UTC)

Capture orbit?[edit]

74.111.160.142 (talk) 16:05, 9 October 2015 (UTC)If Newtonian mechanics is assumed and the object does not collide with the central body, how can it be captured? Doesn't the object escape to infinity after it's nearest approach?