Talk:Session Description Protocol

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Caps[edit]

"Session Description Protocol" is a title. Therefore, all letters are capitalized. - RobLa 09:12 Dec 22, 2002 (UTC)

External Reference[edit]

The external reference to RFC3108 concerns itself with SDP over ATM Bearer Connections. It is a somewhat obscure RFC (not even gaining a mention in RFC5411). The Offer/Answer model (RFC3264) is much more important for SDP operation, thus I removed RFC3108 and added RFC3264. —Preceding unsigned comment added by JesperANielsen (talkcontribs) 06:44, 26 August 2010 (UTC)

ASCII[edit]

SDP is not ASCII encoded per-se. Some elements are (e.g. name), but other not (e.g. textural strings). It is correct to say it is UTF8 encoded by default (as UTF8 incorporates ASCII). Exceptions to this are found when the 'charset' attribute encoding specification directs session name and information values to have an alternate encoding - a short description of the charset attribute has been added.

5 terms related to SDP[edit]

I do not like this section, I assume this was added due to this comment in the SDP RFC

"The following terms are used in this document, and have specific meaning within the context of this document."

Which follows the mentioning of those terms. However that is really just for definition of those terms within the context of the RFC. They are not really that relevant and in the way this information is written in the page it implies that these are the main terms of SDP which they most certainly are not.

Streaming Media[edit]

Moved this comment from the main page:

"Does not have to streaming media. It is used to describer any type of media. Here the valid types of media can be audio, video, application, data and control. It also specifies the specifc media encoding that is used. SDP also specifies important connection information (e.g. UDP port numbers) where this media can sent/received. SDP can also be used to describe start and stop times of a session, and repititions(of a session) if necessary."

-- markmc 13:48, 1 December 2005 (UTC)

Usage?[edit]

Are there some commercial softwares or Internet services, or widespread freeware, that really are using SDP? I suggest a section called Usage. Mange01 21:47, 3 December 2006 (UTC)

Well VLC (for example) uses SDP when playing RTSP urls and most (all?) SIP phones uses SDP with SIP when negotiating media settings --81.170.214.194 (talk) 15:00, 10 January 2008 (UTC)

Example explanation[edit]

I'm not sure about the explanations of the fields "o" and "c" in context of the example in the "Session Description" section. As far as I understand from the semantics of the example itself, the RFC, as well as other sources (like http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~jac22/books/mm/book/node179.html), the "o" identifies the person responsible for the session (i.e. the machine and the user on the machine that broadcasts the stream) - the e-mail adddress and name of which is sent along in the "e" field (which in this example coincide - jdoe probably is the username for someone named John Doe with an email address j.doe@example.com). Also, it is suggested that the streams are sent FROM a multicast address, which I don't know how much sense makes. I think it's more likely that the stream is broadcast FROM 10.47.16.5 TO the addresses in the group 224.2.17.12/127. I think that in the context of SIP, or some other negotiation protocol exchanging sdp files, the "o" field might, indeed, contain the address of the client selecting, for instance, one of the configurations offered by the session owner, but to me this looks more like an offer advertised by jdoe.

I'm no expert in this field, I just wanted to learn about this and it seemed to me that some of the information is a bit self-contradictory. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 188.27.51.225 (talk) 14:51, 20 November 2013 (UTC)

As far as I can tell this comment is correct, the description as it exists in the article is incorrect. I will review and correct this later. --keisisqrl (talk) 20:44, 21 June 2016 (UTC)
Update: page has been revised. --keisisqrl (talk) 21:29, 21 June 2016 (UTC)

Disambiguation[edit]

In my opinion this article should link to it since vice versa is true. I found it searching for SDP while I wanted service discovery. Maybe a disambiguation page, even. 150.254.141.97 (talk) 19:37, 24 November 2015 (UTC)

SDP is a disambiguation page. Not sure where you went wrong. ~Kvng (talk) 16:26, 27 November 2015 (UTC)