Talk:Spanish Steps

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Spanish Square[edit]

Piazza di Spagna is should be Spanish Square since it is a square, but probably for political or other reasons the name was change in English and other languages. Maybe a separate article has to be made to the steps that are part of the square. --Poshista (talk) 08:48, 15 June 2010 (UTC)

Engagement ring[edit]

I bought my wife's engagement ring in a shop in the building adjacent to the steps (looking up from the plaza, it is the building on the left). I guess that is not something for teh article. --Amcalabrese 20:40, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

Unless you or your wife are famous probably not ;-) Spiros Bousbouras (talk) 13:48, 12 May 2009 (UTC)

Stairs to the Shipka Memorial[edit]

They are 894, while the Spanish steps are 138. I'm not sure if they qualify as a single staircase, though. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 78.90.52.195 (talk) 05:26, 2 October 2008 (UTC)

I was thinking of something similar. The article says The Scalinata is the longest and widest staircase in Europe. I find it very hard to believe that throughout Europe there are no stairs with more than 138 steps. And are we talking only about stairs out into the open or also steps inside buildings? Spiros Bousbouras (talk) 13:46, 12 May 2009 (UTC)

The Odessa Steps have 192 steps and look longer. --Asmaybe (talk) 19:03, 22 December 2009 (UTC)

They are both longer and wider. 89.68.155.227 (talk) 21:03, 12 September 2011 (UTC)

User:Jvelez[edit]

Would you please cite your source for your unusual assertions about the piazza di Spagna:

Initially the piazza was divided into two parts, the French Square (because the French ambassador resided there) and the Spanish Square. The steps themselves, however, came to be called Spanish Steps after the Spanish Square (which was called Spanish because the Spanish embassy to the Holy See was – and is - located there). For a while, in the 17th century, the entire Piazza di Spagna was considered Spanish territory. Apparently foreigners unwittingly trespassing into the area could even find themselves all of a sudden to be soldiers in the Spanish army.

Thank you. A copy of this note has been posted at User talk:Jvelez.--Wetman (talk) 20:58, 28 January 2009 (UTC)

moved[edit]

This is not appropriate and is unsourced: --Richard Arthur Norton (1958- ) (talk) 04:06, 26 May 2009 (UTC)

Initially the piazza was divided into two parts, the French Square (because the French ambassador resided there - Trinità dei Monti was patroned by the French government) and the Spanish Square. The steps themselves, however, came to be called Spanish Steps after the Spanish Square (which was called Spanish because the Spanish embassy to the Holy See was – and is – located there). For a while, in the 17th century, the entire Piazza di Spagna was considered Spanish territory. Apparently foreigners unwittingly trespassing into the area could even find themselves all of a sudden to be soldiers in the Spanish army.

Copyright violations[edit]

I removed one clear copyright violation from this article, essentially undoing this edit. I suspect that there's another one, taken from here. Can anyone please check the dates and verify? —Ynhockey (Talk) 23:35, 15 June 2013 (UTC)

Widest in Europe?[edit]

I removed the claim that the steps are the widest in Europe. The claim supposedly had a source, but reading the source reveals that it is based on a quote made in 1799. I seems unlikely this would apply today anymore. (A quick search doesn't reveal the measurements of the steps.) In case someone confirms that this still applies, the removed bit is here:

The Scalinata is the widest staircase in Europe.

Based on:

Boyer Gillies, Linda (1972) An Eighteenth-Century Roman View Panini's Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti, in The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, volume 30, issue 4, date: February 1972, pages 176–184, doi=10.2307/3258528, jstor=3258528.

And in the source reveals the claim is only based on this quote:

The hill, at the summit of which stands the monastery of the French order of Minims, is covered with a wide marble cloak that forms what is without a doubt the longest and widest staircase in all Europe. – Charled de Brosses, Lettres historiques et critiques sur l'Italie 1799)

Gemena (talk) 08:53, 29 June 2014 (UTC)

Real name of the steps[edit]

The steps are named (Scalinata di Trinità dei Monti in English Stairway of Trinita dei Monti) after the church at the top Trinità dei Monti, surely this article should include this?--Rockysantos (talk) 09:47, 8 June 2016 (UTC)