Talk:Sports injury

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Medicine (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Sports (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Sports, a WikiProject which aims to improve coverage of sport-related topics on Wikipedia. For more information, visit the project page, where you can join the project and/or contribute to the discussion.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 


"Catastrophic head injury three times greater in high school vs. collegiate football players"[edit]

Dr. Boden suggests that players should be discouraged from using their heads to tackle, since 81% of the injuries were caused by helmet-to-helmet collisions (16/37) and helmet-to-body collisions (14/37). [1] Brian Pearson 02:17, 4 July 2007 (UTC)


Effects of Sports Injury[edit]

In this section it would be a good idea to address athletes and what sports injuries can do to their careers. Will they fully recover? If not to what extent will they be able to play again? Percentages would best be able to aid in the answering of this question and some examples within sports. Onlybecauseihaveto (talk) 19:44, 8 February 2012 (UTC)

Types of Injury[edit]

I think overall the article is a good one. However i think that since the article is about sports injury that a diagnosis of the many different types of sports injuries would be relevant. This would have to be a continuous effort on the part of everyone to keep adding various injuries to the article and then the symptoms and treatment can follow also but i believe this can be an incredible article because of the amount of information that can be added. MrCampion10 (talk) 23:06, 8 February 2012 (UTC)

I'm not sure if every feasible injury needs to be added, but at the very least it would be helpful to have a breakdown of the most common injuries by sport, their range of severity and the signs/symptoms that said injury has formed/is forming. With this it would also be nice to have the situations in which these injuries are most likely to occur such as: over-training, over-stressing of ligaments, head to head collisions etc. JB2794 (talk) 22:21, 9 February 2012 (UTC)

Sociological Impact of Injuries[edit]

Given that college athletes, especially in Division 1 programs, spend a great deal of time with their teammates and coaches, I believe it should be addressed how an athlete's relationship has the potential to change with a serious injury. If an athlete is used to the regimented lifestyle of a college athlete, how does he or she react to that change? Are they able to maintain the same relationships with teammates who are practicing and playing games together, while they are not playing? Do college athletes tend to come back stronger from injuries or do they regress? Are their social bonds effected, or can they usually maintain similarly strong bonds with teammates? Rekjlhoya (talk) 00:40, 10 February 2012 (UTC)

Expansion and Editing Ideas[edit]

Some reliable sources that can be used to further expand on the detail in this article include the "Sports Injury Prevention"[1] book. This book contains information on how to focus on reducing potential injuries. I think the article could be a reliable and beneficial source to use because the book explains different exercises to do in order to prevent common injuries in almost every sport as well as how to set up an injury prevention program as a team. The book also discusses why it is important to prevent injuries. I think the "Sports Injury Prevention" book could be a great asset to use in order to expand the Prevention section that is currently only two sentences. Another reliable source that can be used to further expand many sections of this article includes "Sports Injuries: Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Rehabilitation"[2] book. This book discusses the ways of going about preventing injuries, the history of injuries, the technology used for treatment, and how to diagnosis injuries. I think "Sports Injuries: Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Rehabilitation" book could be a great contribution to this article because I could find how injuries have changed throughout history and discuss what I have learned on the Wikipedia page and also look into how technology for diagnosing injuries has changed and how it works today. Another reliable source that can be used to expand on the Sports Medicine subheading could be the book "Nerve and Vasculature Injuries in Sports Medicine."[3] This book presents how injuries happen in the body through the process of what happens at the cause of injury and the after effects of an injury on the body. The two main systems affected when injured are the nervous and vascular systems, so discussing what happens in these areas upon injury I think would be interesting and a great addition to this Wikipedia article. Another reliable source that could be used to expand on the Emotional-Stress subheading could be the journal "Emotional Trauma in Athletic Injury and the Relationship Among Coping Skills, Injury Severity, and Post traumatic Stress".[4] This journal presents the research in that anxiety, stress, and depression were elevated following sport injuries. I think this topic is very interesting and I was curious to see why and how the researchers discovered these emotional feelings. I think this would be great contribution to explore. My last reliable source that I found was a journal on "Sports Injury Research".[5]The journal discusses that sports and physical activity is growing in order to tackle obesity and other lifestyle related illnesses. I think this could be a good source to bring up somewhere in the article because it talks about the growth in physical activity and sports that is resulting in an increase in injuries and side effects, while also offering advice and ways to prevent it.

LindseyRenk (talk) 02:16, 23 February 2016 (UTC)

Editing the Lead Section[edit]

The lead section in this article needed to be expanded because it only defined what Sports Injury's were, but did not summarize the topics that would later be discussed throughout the article. I drafted a new lead section trying to incorporate the subheading like Prevention, Sports Medicine, Emotional-Stress, and Treatment. I think this article could use more sources, so I incorporated some of the ideas from the reliable scholarly journals and books into the lead section in order to introduce an interesting topic. I plan on expanding into greater detail in the sections of Prevention, Sports Medicine, Emotional-Stress, and Treatment. I think this article has great structure and subheadings it just needs improvement on detail and expansion in the certain sections listed above that I plan to edit. I think in the Prevention section I could expand on different exercises to do in order to prevent common injuries in almost every sport as well as how to set up an injury prevention program as a team. I think the article could also expand on the knowledge of technological medical treatment used to diagnosis injuries. Also, including statistics about injuries, prevention methods, and treatment would allow the readers to relate to how treating injuries has changed and what injuries are now common. I also think it would be beneficial to include how injuries happen in the body through the process of what happens at the cause of injury and the after effects of an injury on the body. Lastly, I think including successful coping skills to injuries would appropriate for every reader to know.

Sports injuries are injuries that occur in athletic activities or exercising. They can result from accidents, poor training in practice, inadequate equipment, and overuse of a particular body part. In the United States there are about 30 million teenagers and children that participate in some form of organized sport. About 3 million avid sports competitors 14 years of age and under experience sports injuries annually, which causes some loss of time of participation in the sport.[6]The leading cause of death involving sports-related injuries, although rare, is brain injuries. When injured the two main systems affected are the nervous and vascular systems. The origins in the body where numbness and tingling occurs upon sports injuries are usually the first signs of the body telling you that the body was impacted. Pain generators usually cause tingling. Although tingling can be due to nerve dysfunction, it is most often perceived when muscle or vascular structures are disturbed.[3] Numbness, on the other hand, is defined as a lack of sensation. Numbness is thought to be more specific and unique to nerve injury than is the sensation of tingling. Thus, when an athlete complains of numbness and especially tingling, the key to a diagnosis is to obtain a detailed history of the athlete’s acquired symptom perception, determine the effect the injury had on the body and its processes, and then establish the prime treatment method. In the process to determine what exactly happened in the body and the standing effects most medical professionals choose a method of technological medical devices to acquire a credible solution to the site of injury. Prevention helps reduce potential Sport Injuries. It is important to establish participation in warm-ups, stretching, and exercises that focus on main muscle groups commonly used in the sport of interest. Also, creating an injury prevention program as a team, which includes education on rehydration, nutrition, monitoring team members “at risk”, monitoring behavior, skills, and techniques.[7] Season analysis reviews and preseason screenings are also beneficial reviews for preventing player Sport Injuries. Following Sport Injuries research shows that levels of anxiety, stress, and depression are elevated. According to a study by John William O’Connor it was found that athletes with severe sports injuries would display higher levels of posttraumatic distress and the higher the levels of posttraumatic distress are linked with avoidant coping skills. [4]

LindseyRenk (talk) 00:24, 1 March 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ Bager, Roald; Engebretsen, Lars (2009). Sports Injury Prevention. Chichester, UK;Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 9781405162449. Retrieved 22 February 2016. 
  2. ^ Doral, Mahmut Nedim (2012). Tandoğan, Reha N.; Mann, Gideon; Verdonk, René, eds. Sports Injuries: Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Rehabilitation. Heidelberg, New York: Springer. ISBN 978-3-642-15630-4. Retrieved 22 February 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Akuthota, Venu; Herring, Stanley A. (2009). Nerve and Vascular Injuries in Sports Medicine. London; New York: Springer. ISBN 9780387765990. Retrieved 22 February 2016.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Akuthota" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  4. ^ a b O’Connor, John William (2010). "Emotional Trauma in Athletic Injury and the Relationship Among Coping Skills, Injury Severity, and Posttraumatic Stress". ProQuest Dissertations Publishing. Retrieved 22 February 2016.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "O.27Connor" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  5. ^ Verhagen, Evert; Van Mechelen, Willem (2010). Sports Injury Research. New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199561629. Retrieved 22 February 2016. 
  6. ^ "Sports Injury Statistics". Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. Retrieved 29 February 2016. 
  7. ^ Bager, Roald; Engebretsen, Lars (2009). Sports Injury Prevention. Chichester, UK; Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 9781405162449. Retrieved 29 February 2016.