Talk:Timon of Athens

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Theatre (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is part of WikiProject Theatre, a WikiProject dedicated to coverage of theatre on Wikipedia.
To participate: Feel free to edit the article attached to this page, join up at the project page, or contribute to the project discussion.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Elizabethan theatre
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Elizabethan theatre, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of the theatre and dramatic literature in England between 1558 and 1642 on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 
WikiProject Shakespeare (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Shakespeare, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of William Shakespeare on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Alcibiades' glove[edit]

The significance of Alcibiades throwing down his glove is that he is reconciled to the Athenians (subject to justice for his wrongs.) Unlike Timon, he can forgive, or else "just get along". Mentioning the reconciliation is key to understanding the glove bit

Timon's mental health[edit]

Isaac Asimov's analysis of this play (in Asimov's Guide to Shakespeare) suggests that Timon's behavior is odd from start to finish. He gives away far more than a reasonable person would, and refuses to let others be generous to him, until he's wasted everything. Then he wants his friends to be just as imprudent as he is. They may not all be false friends, just practical. Certainly that rocks-and-water feast does not suggest a balanced mind. It's something to think about. rewinn 04:36, 15 July 2006 (UTC)

Spoiler[edit]

The death of timon in the intro is a spoiler so some sort of warning should be placed before the introduction. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 207.81.161.36 (talk) 01:53, 13 February 2007 (UTC).

I'm not sure that the death of the central character in a play designated a tragedy is a "spoiler". --Scottandrewhutchins 21:57, 13 February 2007 (UTC)

The article contains an error regarding the diet of Apemantus.[edit]

The article contains an error regarding the diet of Apemantus. The article states that Apemantus, like Timon, eats only roots and water. However, in Act IV, Scene III, Apemantus offers Timon a "medlar", which Timon refuses. A medlar is an edible, apple-shaped fruit of the deciduous European tree, Mespilus germanica.

Similarly, in the same scene, when asked by Timon, "Where feed'st thou o' days, Apemantus?", Apemantus replies, "Where my stomach finds meat; or, rather, where I eat it." Clearly, Apemantus eats food other than roots and water. —Preceding unsigned comment added by SvenTwelve (talkcontribs) 06:20, 7 December 2007 (UTC)