Talk:Volumetric heat capacity

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Fluids in the range 1.3 to 1.9MJ/kg.K?[edit]

That is clearly wrong as water is 4.2kJ/kg.K and about 1000kg/m^3 giving about 4.2MJ/m^3.K and water is a fluid. --njh 03:40, 28 October 2006 (UTC)

The figures for the quantity variation seem wrong[edit]

Just like the discrepancy noted above for liquids, the range for solids and the claim that it's a constant 1 kj/m^3.K would need references. In fact, I hope someone could add a table with various materials' volumetric heat capacity, or extend the table in Specific heat capacity --203.159.36.11 (talk) 18:00, 18 November 2008 (UTC)

for contant pressure or volume?[edit]

Notice that VHC can be calculated for constant pressure or constant volume. Mostly used for gases. --ZJ (talk) 16:46, 12 March 2010 (UTC)

Thermal inertia - mechanics analogy[edit]

According to this article an analogy between heat transfer and mechanics is implied as follows:

  • Thermal inertia = mass
  • Rate of change in temperature = acceleration
  • Heat transfer = applied force

Now if this is the case I can understand why heat capacity and density would be positively proportional to the root of the thermal inertia in the given equation ( I=sqrt(kρc) ) but thermal conductivity should be negatively/inversely correlated/proportional as a material with a high thermal conductivity undergoes a quicker change in temperature than one with a lower thermal conductivity (i.e. an insulator).

Therefore I would suspect that either the explanation/implication or the equation given here are incorrect or maybe there is something lacking in my understanding. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 137.44.1.174 (talk) 00:16, 6 February 2011 (UTC)

|List of VHC[edit]

would it be possible to get a table of VHC for different gasses/liquids? 174.112.104.110 (talk) 01:56, 28 January 2012 (UTC)

There's [list] that's linked from this page. You could ad to that. —Ben FrantzDale (talk) 13:51, 30 January 2012 (UTC)

This page is counterproductive: It should be folded into Heat Capacity.....[edit]

Volumetric concerns are so tightly coupled to what is covered in Heat Capacity that I find it a little confusing to have an additional wikipedia entry dedicated to it. Having it stand alone like this requires a duplication of information in order to have it make any relative sense to Heat Capacity in general. I suggest we terse this down and subsume it back to Heat Capacity.Tgm1024 (talk) 14:20, 10 January 2018 (UTC)