The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most

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The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most
TPYHCtFtM.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedMarch 20, 2001
RecordedFebruary 2001
GenreEmo[1]
Length29:47
LabelVagrant
ProducerJames Paul Wisner
Dashboard Confessional chronology
The Drowning EP
(2001)
The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most
(2001)
So Impossible EP
(2001)
Singles from The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most
  1. "Screaming Infidelities"
    Released: January 15, 2002

The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most is the second studio album recorded by the American emo band Dashboard Confessional, released on March 20, 2001 through Vagrant Records.

Background[edit]

Dashboard Confessional started as an acoustic side project for vocalist/guitarist Chris Carrabba while he was fronting Further Seems Forever.[2] The project's first album The Swiss Army Romance was released in early 2000 through local independent label Fiddler Records. Using his connections within the punk scene, Carrabba was able to perform on a few tours. Though the audience wasn't used to acoustic instrumentation, Carrabba won the crowds over.[3] Eventually demand for the album was exceeding the label's supply, which resulted in owner Amy Fleisher licensing the record to Drive-Thru Records.[4] In October, Carrabba announced his departure from Further Seems Forever.[2]

The following month, Drive-Thru's version of the album was released.[4] In the same month, Fleisher began working for independent label Vagrant Records. She pressed her boss Rich Egan to listen to The Swiss Army Romance, and when he did, exclaimed it was the "most refreshing indie rock I'd heard in forever".[3] Carrabba thought Drive-Thru wouldn't be a good fit for the project, and told them that.[5] The project signed to Vagrant instead,[2] which caused Drive-Thru to threaten litigation. In response, Carrabba stated he wasn't signed to Drive-Thru,[4] and simply had an oral agreement with them.[6]

Soon afterwards, Drive-Thru ceased supplying the release to distributors, which in turn made it unavailable in brick and mortar stores.[4] When Carrabba became aware of this, he decided to start working on a new album. He flew to Florida, met his brother at the airport with his guitar, and went to James Paul Wisner's apartment.[5] With Carrabba spending the opening three weeks of 2001 crafting songs for the next album, the project evolved into a band consisting of: Carrabba, bassist Dan Bonebrake (Carabba's bandmate in the Vacant Andy's), and drummer Mike Marshall,[4] formerly of The Agency.[2]

Production[edit]

Between the end of January and early March, the group went on tour with Face to Face, H2O, and Snapcase. Their performances started with Carrabba solo, then the band joined midway through, and concluded with Carrabba solo again.[2] In between dates on the tour, they recorded their second album. Recording occurred in February[4] over two and a half weeks.[7] By this point, the group had only practiced together three times.[7] "Screaming Infidelities" and "Again I Go Unnoticed" were re-recorded from their original appearance on the band's first album The Swiss Army Romance. Jolie Lindholm of The Rocking Horse Winner lent her vocals to some of the songs on the album.[8]

Release[edit]

The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most was released on March 20, 2001.[9] Following this, the band went on tour until late May. For the last half of May, they toured with The Weakerthans.[10] Another tour in June and early July followed, before joining the Vagrant America Tour, which continued into September.[11] The group added Sunny Day Real Estate guitarist Dan Hoerner to their line-up,[12] and closed the year with a six-week long headlining tour[13] from late October to early December.[14] A music video was filmed for "Screaming Infidelities" in early January 2002 with directors Maureen Egan and Matthew Barry.[13] The track was remixed by Andy Wallace[3] and released as a single[15] on January 15. The song's music video debuted later in the month[13] and was in heavy rotation at MTV and MTV2.[16] Following this, the album was given retail exposure with listening booths at various big chain stores.[13]

In addition, the release received heavy airplay support from 89X, KFSD and WVEP.[13] In March and April, they went a tour of the US with support from The Anniversary,[17] Ben Kweller and Seafood.[18] By June, John Lefler joined the band as an additional guitarist.[19] In July and August, the group supported Weezer on their headlining US arena tour.[20] Following this, the band went on the Vagrant America arena tour, alongside other Vagrant Records bands.[21] A music video for "Saints and Sailors" premiered on MTV2 on August 22.[22] The clip was one shot at the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles, California.[23] At the end of the month, the group appeared at the Reading and Leeds Festivals.[24] In October and November, the group went on a headlining US tour with support from Piebald[25] and Rhett Miller.[26]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4/5 stars [27]
CMJ New Music ReportFavorable [28]
LAS MagazineUnfavorable [29]
The Morning CallUnfavorable [30]
Pitchfork4.2/10 [31]
Q4/5 stars [32]
Robert Christgau(dud) [33]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide4/5 stars [34]

The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most sold 2,500 copies in its first week,[35] over 40,000 copies by August,[4] and 65,000 by the end of the year.[13] By mid-2002, it surpassed the 200,000 mark,[36] and was close to the 400,000 mark by early 2003.[37] As of August 2003, sales stood at 426,000 copies.[35] The album has been certified Gold by the RIAA, meaning it sold over 500,000 copies in the United States.[38]

The album, according to Rock Sound, gave Dashboard Confessional "a ton of worldwide exposure."[39] This resulted in Carrabba becoming "the poster boy for the emo resurgence of the early 2000s" and the album "defin[ing] an entire movement."[39]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Chris Carrabba.

  1. "The Brilliant Dance" – 3:03
  2. "Screaming Infidelities" – 3:46
  3. "The Best Deceptions" – 4:15
  4. "This Ruined Puzzle" – 2:52
  5. "Saints and Sailors" – 2:33
  6. "The Good Fight" – 2:27
  7. "Standard Lines" – 2:27
  8. "Again I Go Unnoticed" – 2:17
  9. "The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most" – 2:56
  10. "This Bitter Pill" – 3:14

Chart performance[edit]

Chart Peak
position
US Billboard 200[40] 108
US Independent Albums (Billboard)[41] 5

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ Exposito, Suzy (March 1, 2016). "40 Greatest Emo Albums of All Time". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 1, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e Stratton, Jeff (January 25, 2001). "Bandwidth". New Times Broward-Palm Beach. Voice Media Group. Archived from the original on October 3, 2002. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c Greenwald 2002, p. 22
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Bowker, Tom (August 23, 2001). "Chris Craft". New Times Broward-Palm Beach. Voice Media Group. Archived from the original on June 24, 2018. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  5. ^ a b Singh, Surej (August 31, 2017). "Dashboard Confessional evaluate their discography (and career) thus far". Bandwagon. Bandwagon Pte Ltd. Archived from the original on June 20, 2018. Retrieved June 25, 2018.
  6. ^ Kentfield, Matt (January 30, 2002). "Lots to look for as indie labels Vagrant and Drive-Thru Records expand with new releases and large fan base". The Quinnipiac Chronicle. Archived from the original on April 8, 2018. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  7. ^ a b D'Angelo, Joe (July 25, 2003). "Dashboard Confessional Singer Heals Scars, Stops Singing The Blues On New LP". MTV. Viacom. Archived from the original on June 22, 2018. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  8. ^ "The Story of Dashboard Confessional". Dashboard Confessional. Archived from the original on December 11, 2002. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  9. ^ "The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most - Dashboard Confessional | Release Info". AllMusic. All Media Network, LLC. Archived from the original on June 25, 2018. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  10. ^ "Tour". Dashboard Confessional. Archived from the original on April 11, 2001. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  11. ^ "Tour". Dashboard Confessional. Archived from the original on August 2, 2001. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  12. ^ CMJ New Music Report 2001, p. 11
  13. ^ a b c d e f Hawkins 2001, p. 41
  14. ^ "Tour". Dashboard Confessional. Archived from the original on February 12, 2002. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  15. ^ Screaming Infidelities (Sleeve). Dashboard Confessional. Vagrant Records. 2001. VR0004-2P.
  16. ^ Downey, Ryan J. (April 12, 2016). "Taste Of Tuesday: Looking back at Dashboard Confessional's first AP cover". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. Archived from the original on April 15, 2016. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  17. ^ "Team Effort For Dashboard Confessional Shows". Pollstar. January 21, 2002. Archived from the original on November 25, 2002. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  18. ^ Hart 2002, p. 34
  19. ^ "Dashboard Confessional". Pollstar. June 3, 2002. Archived from the original on September 13, 2003. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  20. ^ "Sparta added to already loaded Weezer tour". Kludge. May 28, 2002. Archived from the original on March 5, 2008. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  21. ^ Heisel, Scott (December 15, 2001). "Vagrant America 2002 – HUGE Update". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Archived from the original on February 13, 2017. Retrieved February 12, 2017.
  22. ^ "News". Dashboard Confessional. Archived from the original on October 17, 2002. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  23. ^ Mo Barry (July 19, 2007). Dashboard Confessional "Saints and Sailors" - Official Music Video. YouTube. Archived from the original on November 30, 2015. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  24. ^ Heisel, Scott (June 11, 2002). "More bands confirmed for Reading/Leeds Festivals". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Archived from the original on June 25, 2018. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  25. ^ Heisel, Scott (August 23, 2002). "Saves The Day, Dashboard Confessional announce fall tours". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Archived from the original on April 14, 2018. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  26. ^ "Rhett Miller". Pollstar. October 17, 2002. Archived from the original on August 21, 2003. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  27. ^ AllMusic review
  28. ^ Sciarretto 2001, p. 4
  29. ^ LAS Magazine review Archived 2017-02-13 at the Wayback Machine.
  30. ^ Faylor, Gordon (February 23, 2002). "CD Dashboard Confessional "The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most"(Vagrant Records)". The Morning Call. Robert York. Archived from the original on June 24, 2018. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  31. ^ Pitchfork review
  32. ^ Q review Archived 2015-09-05 at the Wayback Machine.
  33. ^ Robert Christgau review Archived 2014-05-21 at the Wayback Machine.
  34. ^ The Rolling Stone Album Guide review
  35. ^ a b D'Angelo, Joe (August 22, 2003). "Dashboard Confessional Touring Again — Just In Time". MTV. Viacom. Archived from the original on June 22, 2018. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  36. ^ Edwards, Gavin (July 8, 2002). "Dashboard Confessional's King of Pain". Rolling Stone. Jann Wenner. Archived from the original on November 11, 2007. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  37. ^ "New Dashboard Confessional Album Due In July". Billboard. Lynne Segall. March 25, 2003. Archived from the original on June 20, 2018. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  38. ^ "Dashboard Confessional Biography". Starpulse.com. Archived from the original on June 22, 2013. Retrieved December 2, 2013.
  39. ^ a b Bird, ed. 2015, p. 26
  40. ^ "Dashboard Confessional Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard.
  41. ^ "Dashboard Confessional Chart History (Independent Albums)". Billboard.

Sources