The Seaside (Waterford, Connecticut)

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The Seaside
Seaside Sanitorium, Waterford, CT.jpg
The Seaside (Waterford, Connecticut) is located in Connecticut
The Seaside (Waterford, Connecticut)
The Seaside (Waterford, Connecticut) is located in the US
The Seaside (Waterford, Connecticut)
Location 36 Shore Rd., Waterford, Connecticut
Coordinates 41°18′8″N 72°7′55″W / 41.30222°N 72.13194°W / 41.30222; -72.13194Coordinates: 41°18′8″N 72°7′55″W / 41.30222°N 72.13194°W / 41.30222; -72.13194
Area 36 acres (15 ha)
Built 1934
Architect Cass Gilbert
Architectural style Tudor Revival, Classical Revival
NRHP reference # 95001007[1]
Added to NRHP August 15, 1995

The Seaside is a historic medical facility at 36 Shore Road in Waterford, Connecticut. It is nationally significant as the first institution designed for heliotropic treatment of children suffering from tuberculosis. Its buildings "comprise an exceptional collection of fully realized and generally well-preserved Tudor Revival-style institutional architecture", which were designed by Cass Gilbert.[2] The property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995.[1]

History[edit]

Originally built to treat kids with tuberculosis but used as an elderly home, medical hospital, and a facility to treat the mentally disabled. In the 1930s it opened for children with tuberculosis. Then in 1958, it was used as an elderly home for 3 years, it was then used to treat the people with developmental disabilities until 1996. During the period in which they treated tuberculosis, it was called Seaside Sanatorium. When it housed the elderly it was called Seaside Geriatric Hospital. Then when reopened again it was called Seaside Regional Center for the Mentally Retarded.

The Waterford property where the Seaside Sanatorium would stand was commissioned in 1930 by The State Tuberculosis Commission. The 28-acre property was purchased from the heirs of the Smith-Grimes estate. More land was purchased in 1936, where its boundaries currently stand, totaling 36 acres. The cost was $125,000. The Seaside is actually the second “The Seaside” to stand for the heliotropic treatment of tuberculosis in children. The first site was at the White Beach Hotel at Crescent Beach in neighboring Niantic, Ct. The original sanatorium was up and running and receiving its first patients by January 1920. Being the first and only treatment center for tuberculosis in the country, the 45 beds quickly filled and the waiting list began to grow. The State Tuberculosis Commission knew they had to expand, but were unable to do so because of the McCook family, who owned the neighboring property, refused to sell. The state went as far as the Supreme Court to try to seize the land through eminent domain. The McCook’s won the lawsuit, however, and the state sought land elsewhere.

Its current property became available and the state purchased it. Famed architect Cass Gilbert was commissioned to design the buildings. The Waterford facility was ready and the Niantic patients transferred in 1934. The location of the center, the first of its kind in the nation, was chosen because of the fresh sea air and ample sunlight. At the time it was thought that fresh air and lots of sunshine could help cure tuberculosis. The children, all 14 and under would spend their days outside sunning as part of their heliotropic treatment. By the end of the 1940s, advancements in drug therapies were being made and the usefulness of sanatoriums declined.

Governor Dannel Malloy has made a final decision to rebuild the Seaside Sanatorium as a state park.[when?] Four years prior, Malloy signed a contract with the developer, Mark Steiner, for the property and hasn't heard anything about it until the Gov. canceled the contract. Mark Steiner had financial problems, those were the reason why he couldn't work on the contract of the property. Sen. Len Fasano, GOP legislative leader from North Haven, Connecticut blamed Malloy for disrespecting him by not letting him know about the decision he had made about the property. Malloy wants the community of Waterford, Connecticut to be informed about building the state park, he has directed relevant state agencies to conduct public hearings in Waterford as part of the park planning process, David Bednarz explained.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • "Seaside Sanatorium, Waterford", DamnedCT.com
  • Brief Descriptions of Connecticut State Agencies. Connecticut State Library. Revised 2008-08. Retrieved 2018-03-01.
  • Report of the State Tuberculosis Commission For the Period Beginning October 1, 1918 to June 30, 1920 Internet Archive, uploaded by the University of Toronto on 2008-09-30.
  • Report of the State Tuberculosis Commission For the Period Beginning July 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922 Internet Archive, uploaded by the University of Toronto on 2008-09-30
  • Report of the State Tuberculosis Commission For the Period Beginning July 1, 1924 to June 30, 1926 Internet Archive, uploaded by the University of Toronto on 2008-09-30
  • Report of the State Tuberculosis Commission to the Governor for the Period Beginning July 1, 1930 and ending June 30, 1932. Public Document No. 53. Hartford, Connecticut, State of Connecticut, 1932.
  • Report of the State Tuberculosis Commission to the Governor for the Period Beginning July 1, 1932 and ending June 30, 1934. Public Document No. 53. Hartford, Connecticut, State of Connecticut, 1934.