The Sunday Post

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Sunday Post
Sunday Post cover Nov 9 2008.jpg
A front cover from 16 November 2008
Type Sunday newspaper
Format Tabloid
Owner(s) DC Thomson & Co Ltd.
Founded 1914
Headquarters Dundee, Scotland
Circulation 142,863 (as of December 2016)[1]
Website www.sundaypost.com

The Sunday Post is a weekly newspaper published in Dundee, Scotland, by DC Thomson, and characterised by a mix of news, human interest stories and short features. The paper was founded in 1914 and has a wide circulation across Scotland, Northern Ireland, and parts of Northern England, which may at some points in its history have reached three to five million readers.[2]

The current editor is Richard Prest.

Sales of the Sunday Post in Scotland were once so high that it was recorded in The Guinness Book of Records as the newspaper with the highest per capita readership penetration of anywhere in the world; in 1969, its total estimated readership of 2,931,000 represented more than 80 per cent of the entire population of Scotland aged 16 and over.[3] The Sunday Post has seen a decline in circulation in common with other print titles; in 1999 circulation was around 700,000, dropping to just under 143,000 in December 2016, with a year-on-year fall of 13.5% recorded for 2016.[1]

2007 saw DC Thomson launch an advertising drive for The Sunday Post, primarily used on buses, in which the exclamation "Strip Sensation!" is seen by a picture of the folded paper displaying its masthead; next to this is the tagline punning on the exclamation: "A thoroughly decent read".

The newspaper backed a "No" vote in the referendum on Scottish independence.[4]

In 2014 a weekly magazine supplement was reintroduced. Called IN10, it features entertainment, food, homes, gardens, travel and books as well as The Sunday Post’s man in Hollywood, Ross King.[5]

Regular features[edit]

Regular columns include:

  • My Week by Francis Gay (a generic character), featuring sentimental stories and a weekly short poem
  • The Honest Truth – question and answer celebrity interview feature
  • Raw Deal – consumer problems
  • The Doc Replies – medical advice
  • Can You Do Me a Favour? – readers asking if fellow readers can help them in their quest to find an item (discontinued)
  • The Queries Man – readers send in questions on a range of topics, which an unnamed person answers
  • Your Money - Personal finance feature. [6]
  • On The Box - TV review column. [7]

Former long-running columns included

  • The HON Man – (a generic character), an unidentifiable peripatetic man (represented by a cartoon in all his photographs, and reputedly a team of reporters), who travelled Britain, meeting people and exploring local tourist attractions (HON being short for "Holiday On Nothing").

Comics[edit]

There is a Fun Section featuring comic strips such as:

Comic strips that no longer appear include:

Editors[edit]

2001: David Pollington
2010: Donald Martin[9]
2015: Richard Prest

Out before time[edit]

When Christmas Day falls on Sunday, the paper is published on Christmas Eve.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Print ABCs: Seven UK national newspapers losing print sales at more than 10 per cent year on year". Press Gazette. Retrieved 28 January 2017. 
  2. ^ Kemp, Arnold (3 October 1999). "Jings! Righteous Post on the slide". The Observer. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  3. ^ The Guinness Book of Records 17th edition, published October 1970, p. 96.
  4. ^ "Together we can build a fairer, stronger Scotland". Sunday Post. 14 September 2014. Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
  5. ^ "The Sunday Post launches new weekly magazine". dcthomson.co.uk. Archived from the original on 22 April 2015. 
  6. ^ "Your Money / That's Life / The Sunday Post". sundaypost.com. 
  7. ^ "TV review: The Great British Sewing Bee". sundaypost.com. 
  8. ^ Lew Stringer (4 May 2014). "Blimey! It's another blog about comics!: Cor! Wor Nicky joins The Sunday Post". lewstringer.blogspot.co.uk. 
  9. ^ "Herald editor Donald Martin joins Sunday Post". BBC News. 22 January 2010. 

External links[edit]