Theodore Agnew, Baron Agnew of Oulton

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The Right Honourable
The Lord Agnew of Oulton
DL
Lord agnew.jpg
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the School System
Assumed office
28 September 2017
Monarch Queen Elizabeth II
Prime Minister Theresa May
Sec. of State Justine Greening
Damian Hinds
Preceded by The Lord Nash
Member of the House of Lords
Lord Temporal
Assumed office
19 October 2017
Life peerage
Personal details
Born (1961-01-17) 17 January 1961 (age 57)
Norfolk, England
Political party Conservative

Theodore Thomas More Agnew, Baron Agnew of Oulton DL (born 17 January 1961) is a Norfolk businessman, Conservative life peer and Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Education. Lord Agnew also founded the Inspiration Trust, and is the Trust's former chairman.

Early life[edit]

He was born in Norfolk, brought up in Oulton near Aylsham and educated at Beeston Hall School in Norfolk and Rugby School. After school, he worked in Canada and Australia, initially in farming but later buying and selling a variety of businesses.[1]

Career[edit]

After working in Australia, he returned to the UK and founded Town & Country Assistance in 1989 and grew the business to annual gross revenues of £40 million pa. Selling it to Warburg Pincus in 2002, he became co-founder of WNS Global Services. He resigned as a non-executive director of Jubilee Managing Agency Ltd in 2011, a Lloyd’s insurance business managing £130 million of premiums.

He is a past trustee of Policy Exchange, a Westminster-based think tank. He served as chairman of the Norfolk Community Foundation in 2013 but remains a vice patron.[2]

Agnew is the founder and chairman of the Inspiration Trust, a multi-academy trust that runs fourteen schools in East Anglia. The Trust was founded as the East Norfolk Academy Trust on 14 August 2012, changing its name to the Inspiration Trust on 27 January 2013.[3][4]

Agnew was a non-executive board member of the Department for Education and chairman of its Academies Board from 2013 to 2015. He was appointed lead non-executive board member of the Ministry of Justice in July 2015.[5]

Agnew is a board member of the Education Policy Institute, a Westminster-based research institute.[6]

He was created Baron Agnew of Oulton, of Oulton in the County of Norfolk, on 19 October 2017.[7] Sitting with the Conservative Party group in the House of Lords.[8] He was appointed as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the School System, in the Department for Education on 28 September 2017.[9][10]

Personal life[edit]

Agnew donated a total of £134,000 to the Conservative Party between 2007 and 2009.[11]

Honours[edit]

Agnew was appointed a deputy lieutenant (DL) of Norfolk in 2013.[12] He was made a Knight Bachelor in the 2015 New Year Honours 'for services to education'.[13][14][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ George, Martin (9 August 2013). "Theodore Agnew from 11 plus misery and brothel cleaning to business success and a top job at the department for education". www.edp24.org.uk. Retrieved 9 August 2013.
  2. ^ "Patrons | Norfolk Community Foundation". norfolkfoundation.com. Retrieved 18 July 2016.
  3. ^ "About us - our trustees - Inspiration Trust". inspirationtrust.org. Retrieved 18 July 2016.
  4. ^ "INSPIRATION TRUST - Overview (free company information from Companies House)". beta.companieshouse.gov.uk. Retrieved 18 July 2016.
  5. ^ "Sir Theodore Agnew - GOV.UK". gov.uk. Retrieved 18 July 2016.
  6. ^ "Sir Theodore Agnew - Education Policy Institute". epi.org.uk. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  7. ^ "No. 62088". The London Gazette. 24 October 2017. p. 19606.
  8. ^ "Lord Agnew of Oulton". parliament.uk. House of Lords. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  9. ^ "Lord Theodore Agnew". gov.uk. HM Government. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  10. ^ "New ministerial appointments September 2017: DfE and DIT". Retrieved 28 September 2017.
  11. ^ Kleinman, Mark (13 June 2015). "Gove Sparks Row Over Tory Donor Appointment". Sky News. Retrieved 14 June 2015.
  12. ^ "Lieutenancy of Norfolk". thegazette.co.uk. Retrieved 18 July 2016.
  13. ^ "No. 61092". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 2014. p. N2.
  14. ^ "2015 New Year Honours List" (PDF). gov.uk. Retrieved 18 July 2016.
  15. ^ "No. 61320". The London Gazette. 11 August 2015. p. 14934.