Timmins—James Bay (provincial electoral district)

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Timmins—James Bay
Ontario electoral district
Timmins-jbprov.PNG
Timmins—James Bay in relation to other electoral districts in Northern Ontario
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Ontario
MPP
 
 
 
Gilles Bisson
New Democratic
District created 1999
First contested 1999
Last contested 2014
Demographics
Population (2001) 71,648
Electors (2007) 48,516
Area (km²) 250,557
Pop. density (per km²) 0.29
Census divisions District of Cochrane, District of Timiskaming, District of Kenora

Timmins—James Bay is a provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1999. Its population in 2001 was 84,001.

The district includes the extreme eastern part of the District of Kenora, all of the District of Cochrane except for the central western part, and a small part south of Timmins, and all of the District of Timiskaming except for the extreme southeastern part.

Geography[edit]

Timmins—James Bay consists of

  • the part of the Territorial District of Kenora lying east of a line drawn from the northeast corner of the most northerly point of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay (Albany River) due north to Hudson Bay;
  • the Territorial District of Cochrane, excluding the part bounded by a line drawn from the western limit of the territorial district east along the northern limits of the townships of Boyce, Boyce, Shuel, Mulloy, Fintry, Auden, Rogers, Fushimi, Bannerman, Ritchie, Mulvey, Goldwin, Sweet, Hillmer, McKnight, Boyle, Mowbray, Howells, Sheldon, Pinard and Mewhinney, south along the eastern boundaries of the townships of Mewhinney, Bourassa, Tolmie, Menapia, Beniah, Colquhoun and Calder, west along the northern boundary of the Township of Ottaway, south along the western boundaries of the townships of Ottaway, Beck, Lucas and Prosser, and west along the southern boundaries of the townships of Carnegie, Reid, Thorburn, Moberly, Aitken, Poulett, Watson and Lisgar, to the southwestern limit of the territorial district;
  • the part of the Territorial District of Timiskaming bounded by a line drawn from the northeast corner of the Township of Harris, west along the northern boundaries of the townships of Harris, Dymond, Hudson, Lundy, Auld and Speight, and south along the western boundaries of the townships of Speight, Van Nostrand and Leo to the southern limit of the territorial district.

History[edit]

Timmins—James Bay was created in 1999 from all of Cochrane North and part of Cochrane South. At that time, Ontario was divided into the same electoral districts as those used for federal electoral purposes.

It consisted initially of:

  • the part of the Territorial District of Cochrane lying west and north of a line drawn from the southeast corner of the City of Timmins north and west along the east and north limits of the city north along the east boundaries of the Townships of Prosser, Lucas, Beck and Ottaway, west and north al;ong the south and west boundary of the Township of Clute, north along the east boundary of the Township of Colquhoun, and east along the south boundaries of the Townships of Marven, Thorning, Potter, Sangster, Bragg, Newman, Tomlinson, Hurtubise and St. Laurent,
  • the part of the Territorial District of Kenora lying east of a line drawn north from the most northerly northeast corner of the Territorial District of Thunder Bay to Hudson Bay.

In 2005, legislation was passed by the Legislature to divide Ontario into 107 electoral districts, beginning with the next provincial election in 2007. The eleven northern electoral districts are those defined for federal purposes in 1996, based on the 1991 census (except for a minor boundary adjustment). The 96 southern electoral districts are those defined for federal electoral purposes in 2003, based on the 2001 census. Without this legislation, the number of electoral districts in northern Ontario would have been reduced from eleven to ten.[1]

Prior to the 2018 provincial election, the Ontario government's Far North Electoral Boundaries Commission proposed dividing Timmins—James Bay into one riding for the city of Timmins, to be named Timmins, and another riding for the remainder of the current district, to be named Mushkegowuk—James Bay.[2] The creation of Mushkegowuk—James Bay and Kiiwetinong, another new northern riding, were approved with the passage of the Representation Statute Law Amendment Act, 2017 in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.[3]

Members[edit]

Timmins—James Bay
Assembly Years Member Party
Riding created from Cochrane North and Cochrane South
37th  1999–2003     Gilles Bisson New Democratic
38th  2003–2007
39th  2007–2011
40th  2011–2014
41st  2014–Present

Election results[edit]

Ontario general election, 2014
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Gilles Bisson 11,818 51.39 +1.92
Liberal Sylvie Fontaine 5,592 24.32 +11.95
Progressive Conservative Steve Black 5,226 22.72 -13.97
Green Bozena Hrycyna 301 1.31 +0.31
Confederation of Regions Fauzia Sadiq 61 0.27
Total valid votes 22,998 100.00
New Democratic hold Swing -5.02
Source: Elections Ontario[4]
Ontario general election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Gilles Bisson 11,479 49.47 -2.70
Progressive Conservative Al Spacek 8,515 36.69 +28.08
Liberal Leonard Rickard 2,870 12.37 -25.15
Green Angela Plant 233 1.00 -0.70
Freedom Robert Neron 108 0.47  
Total valid votes 23,205 100.00
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 83 0.36
Turnout 23,288 46.84
Eligible voters 49,723
New Democratic hold Swing -15.39
Source: Elections Ontario[5]
Ontario general election, 2007
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Gilles Bisson 13,291 52.17 +2.47
Liberal Pat Boucher 9,560 37.52 -3.64
Progressive Conservative Steve Kidd 2,193 8.61 +0.2
Green Larry Verner 434 1.70 +0.97
Total valid votes 25,478 100.00
Ontario general election, 2003
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Gilles Bisson 14,941 49.70 -3.20
Liberal Michael J. Doody 12,373 41.16 +8.34
Progressive Conservative Merv Russell 2,527 8.41 -4.86
Green Marsha Kriss 219 0.73
Total valid votes 30,060 100.00
Ontario general election, 1999
Party Candidate Votes %
New Democratic Gilles Bisson 16,504 52.90
Liberal Yves Malette 10,238 32.82
Progressive Conservative Marcel Pelchat 4,139 13.27
Independent Ed Walsh 316 1.01
Total valid votes 31,197 100.00

2007 electoral reform referendum[edit]

Ontario electoral reform referendum, 2007
Side Votes %
First Past the Post 18,494 77.3
Mixed member proportional 5,433 22.7
Total valid votes 23,927 100.0

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Elections Ontario web site, “New Electoral Boundaries”
  2. ^ "Ontario to create two new ridings in the north, one to be primarily Indigenous". National Post. The Canadian Press. August 8, 2017. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  3. ^ "New Ridings Created in Northern Ontario". Newsroom. Government of Ontario. October 24, 2017. Retrieved December 11, 2017. 
  4. ^ Elections Ontario (2014). "General Election Results by District, 093 Timmins-James Bay". Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  5. ^ Elections Ontario (2011). "Official return from the records / Rapport des registres officiels - Timmins—James Bay" (PDF). Retrieved 1 June 2014. 

External links[edit]