Tremont Theatre, Boston (1889)

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This article is about the theatre in Boston, Massachusetts, in the 1880s-ca.1940s. For other uses, see Tremont Theatre (disambiguation).
Tremont Theatre, Boston, ca.1910s

The Tremont Theatre (est. 1889) was a playhouse in Boston, Massachusetts, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Henry E. Abbey and John B. Schoeffel[1] established the enterprise[2] and oversaw construction of its building[3] at no.176 Tremont Street in the Boston Theater District area.[4] Managers included Abbey, Schoeffel, Maurice Grau,[5][6] Klaw & Erlanger,[7] Thos. B. Lothan and Albert M. Sheehan.[8]

A traveller's guidebook described the space in 1899: "The auditorium is 75 feet high of the same width and 80 feet deep. It is fashioned on the plan of a mammoth shell. ... The ten oddly fashioned private boxes on either side of the proscenium give a novel effect to the interior. The decoration of the main ceiling is modernized Renaissance treated in Gobelin tapestry effect and the coloring of the walls is in harmonizing shades. The stage is 73 by 45 feet, with a height of 69 feet to the rigging loft. The house has 2,000 seats."[9]

"In 1947 the Tremont became a movie theater named the Astor and briefly, before its demise, a juice bar."[10] "After a fire in 1983, the building was demolished."[11] "Loew’s Boston Common Theater multiplex now occupies the site."[10]

Performances[edit]

Images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John B. Schoeffel (1846-1918); married to actress Agnes Booth. "John B. Schoeffel Dies in Boston at 72; veteran manager once directed Metropolitan Opera House with H.E. Abbey and Maurice Grau." New York Times, September 1, 1918
  2. ^ "Abbey, Henry Eugene". Lamb's biographical dictionary of the United States. Boston: James H. Lamb Company. 1900. 
  3. ^ Atherton Brownell. Boston Theatres of To-Day. The Bostonian, v.2, no.6, 1896
  4. ^ Boston Almanac, 1891, 1894; Boston Register and Business Directory, 1918, 1921
  5. ^ a b c Boston Globe, January 22, 1893
  6. ^ "Death of Maurice Grau". The Theatre. 7 (75). May 1907. 
  7. ^ New York Times, May 14, 1914
  8. ^ a b New York Public Library. Programme: Tremont Theatre - Monday, May 1 - David Belasco presents "The Gold Diggers." (April 24, 1922)
  9. ^ Rand, McNally & Co.'s handy guide to Boston and environs ..., Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1899, OCLC 33412586 
  10. ^ a b Boston Athenaeum. "Theatre History: Tremont Theatre (1889-1949), 176 Tremont Street". Retrieved 2012-02-05. 
  11. ^ Historic New England. Tremont Theatre, Boston, Mass. postcard, ca.1907. Postmarked: August 5, 1911.
  12. ^ Boston Daily Globe, October 20, 1889
  13. ^ New York Times, March 10, 1891
  14. ^ Boston Globe, Aug. 21, 1892
  15. ^ Music (magazine), v.3, Jan. 1893
  16. ^ Boston Evening Transcript, March 12, 1896
  17. ^ Boston Globe, March 26, 1897
  18. ^ a b Boston Evening Transcript, Dec. 17, 1897
  19. ^ a b Boston Globe, April 8, 1898
  20. ^ a b Boston Evening Transcript, May 14, 1898
  21. ^ Boston Globe, Sept. 19, 1902
  22. ^ a b Boston Daily Globe, January 5, 1903
  23. ^ Boston Evening Transcript, Dec. 31, 1903
  24. ^ Boston Evening Transcript, Dec. 31, 1903
  25. ^ Boston Daily Globe, March 28, 1905
  26. ^ The Theatre (magazine), July 1906
  27. ^ Boston Evening Transcript - Oct 25, 1906
  28. ^ Boston Evening Transcript, April 17, 1908
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h Brandeis University Libraries (1987). "A checklist of theatre programs housed in the Special Collections Department". Waltham, Mass. 
  30. ^ Boston Globe, January 5, 1915
  31. ^ Boston Evening Transcript - Jun 3, 1915
  32. ^ Paul Polgar (2008). "Fighting Lightning with Fire: Black Boston's Battle against "The Birth of a Nation."". Massachusetts Historical Review. 10. 
  33. ^ Boston Globe, May 22, 1917
  34. ^ Boston Globe, Feb. 10, 1920
  35. ^ This Week in Boston, Sept. 5, 1920
  36. ^ Boston Globe, Dec. 12, 1922

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 42°21′11.29″N 71°3′51.6″W / 42.3531361°N 71.064333°W / 42.3531361; -71.064333