WYHI

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WYHI
Bible Broadcasting Network (logo).png
CityPark Forest, Illinois
Broadcast areaChicago metropolitan area
Northwest Indiana
Kankakee County, Illinois
Iroquois County, Illinois
BrandingBible Broadcasting Network
SloganWhere You Hear Inspiration
Frequency99.9 MHz
First air dateJanuary 5, 1962 (as WKAK)[1]
FormatChristian radio
ERP50,000 watts
HAAT150 meters (490 ft)
ClassB
Facility ID23476
Callsign meaningWhere You Hear Inspiration
Former callsignsWKAK (1962-1975)[2]
WBYG (1975[2]-1985)[3]
WBSW (1985-1987)[3]
WBUS (1987-1996)[3]
WRZA (1996-2008)[3]
WCPQ (2008-2018)[3]
OwnerBible Broadcasting Network, Inc.
WebcastListen live
Websitebbnradio.org

WYHI (99.9 FM) is a radio station licensed to Park Forest, Illinois, south of Chicago, with its transmitter located south of Peotone, Illinois. WYHI is an owned and operated affiliate of the Bible Broadcasting Network.

History[edit]

WKAK[edit]

From its launch in 1962 until 1975, the station had the call sign WKAK.[2] The station was originally owned by Kenneth Baker, Willis Maltby, and Claude Baker.[2] The station began broadcasting January 5, 1962,[1] and was originally licensed to Kankakee, Illinois, with its transmitter located 2.9 miles north of the city limits, and it had an ERP of 6.6 kw at an HAAT of 210 feet.[2] It was the only FM station in Kankakee at the time.[4]

In the 1960s, the station aired an easy listening format, though in 1969 it began adding Hot 100 selections in the evening.[5][6] By 1972, the majority of the station's playlist was popular music, with standards comprising a quarter of the station's playlist.[7] In June 1972, the station's format was changed to country & western.[7] In late 1974, Claude Baker and Luella Feller sold the station to Harry Fitzgerald, Howard Dybedock, and Benedict Cerven, Sr. for $132,315.[2][8]

WBYG[edit]

On April 7, 1975, the station's call sign was changed to WBYG,[2] and the station was branded "The Big One".[9] As WBYG, the station began airing an adult contemporary format.[1] In 1979, the station's transmitter was moved to Peotone, Illinois, along the Kankakee County/Will County border, and its ERP and HAAT were increased to 50kw and 500 feet respectively.[2] By 1979, WBYG would begin airing an album-oriented rock format, with top 40 music from 6 to 9 AM.[9] The station continued airing an album-oriented rock format into the 1980s.[10][11][12] In early 1984, Harry Fitzgerald, Howard Dybedock, and Ben Cerven sold the station to Gene Milner Broadcasting for $1.2 million.[12][13]

The Bus[edit]

On February 15, 1985, the station's call sign was changed to WBSW.[3] The station was branded as "The Bus".[14][15][16] The Bus initially aired a contemporary album rock format.[9][16][17][18] Shortly after the station's launch, a 20 foot long bus shaped balloon used to advertise the station broke loose from its tethers and floated away, prompting the FAA to issue a warning to pilots.[14][19] Soon thereafter, the Bus would go on to air a CHR format.[15][20][21][22] The station's call sign was changed to WBUS on April 1, 1987.[3] The station aired Casey's Top 40 on Sunday mornings,[23][24][25] and aired dance mixes at night.[23][22][26] The Bus lasted until 1996, when Milner Broadcasting sold the station to Z-Spanish Network for $7 million.[27] "The Bus" branding would return to a CHR station in the area in 1998, on 100.7 WBVS in Coal City, Illinois.[28][29]

Spanish language formats[edit]

Z-Spanish Network launched a regional Mexican format on the station, branded "La Zeta".[30][31][32] On September 23, 1996, the station's call sign was changed to WRZA.[3] In 2000, Z-Spanish Network was acquired by Entravision Communications.[33] On December 29, 2000, the station changed to a Spanish CHR format branded "Super Estrella", which was simulcast on sister station WZCH 103.9 in Dundee, Illinois.[34][35][36] In May 2001, the station's city of license was changed from Kankakee, Illinois to Park Forest, Illinois.[37] In 2004, Entravision Communications sold the station, along with 750 AM WNDZ, to Newsweb Corporation for $24 million.[35][38]

Nine FM and Dance Factory[edit]

In June 2004, Newsweb launched an adult hits format on the station, branded as "Nine FM", with the slogan "We Play Anything".[39][38][40] After Newsweb purchased other rimshot stations, Nine FM's programming expanded to WKIE (92.7 FM) in the north suburbs and WDEK (92.5 FM) west of the Chicago area on November 29, 2004.[40] Sky Daniels was the original program director for Nine FM.[40] When he left in 2005, he was replaced by Matt DuBiel.[39]

In 2006, Chris Chudzik began leasing air time for a dance music show called Dance Factory.[41][42] Initially airing overnight on Saturdays,[41] the program was expanded to seven nights a week on May 14, 2007.[42] Dance Factory continued to air overnight until Newsweb sold the station, even as the station's daytime format changed.[43][44]

Progressive talk[edit]

Newsweb Corporation dropped the Nine FM programming on all three signals Monday, October 20, 2008, and replaced it with a simulcast of sister station WCPT 820's progressive talk programming from 5 A.M. until 9 P.M.[45][46][43] The Nine FM format moved to WKIF 92.7 in Kankakee.[47] The station's call sign was changed to WCPQ on October 27, 2008.[3]

Polski FM[edit]

On June 2, 2014, WCPQ and WCPY broke away from the Progressive Talk simulcast and changed their format to Polish-language news, talk and music, branded as "Polski FM".[44][48] After the station's sale to Bible Broadcasting Network, Polski FM briefly moved to WMFN AM 640.[49]

Bible Broadcasting Network[edit]

On March 20, 2018, it was announced that Newsweb would sell WCPQ to Bible Broadcasting Network for $5,099,000.[50][51][52] The sale was consummated on May 31, 2018,[53] at which point the new owners changed the station's call sign to WYHI.[3] The station joined the Bible Broadcasting Network on June 12, 2018.[54]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Broadcasting Yearbook 1976, Broadcasting, 1976. p. C-60. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h History Cards for WYHI, fcc.gov. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Call Sign History". FCC. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  4. ^ Benoit, Caleb. "Schrock calls 1,800th game on local radio", Daily Journal, March 27, 2009. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  5. ^ Hall, Claude. "Vox Jox", Billboard, July 13, 1968. p. 23. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  6. ^ "WKAK-FM in Shift", Billboard, April 12, 1969. p. 28. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  7. ^ a b "Changing Formats", Broadcasting, June 26, 1972. p. 31. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  8. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting, November 18, 1974. pp. 50-51. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  9. ^ a b c Ghrist, John R. (1996). Valley Voices: A Radio History. Crossroads Communications. p. 293-298.
  10. ^ "AOR", Radio & Records, September 16, 1983. p. 58. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  11. ^ Broadcasting Cablecasting Yearbook 1985, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1985. p. B-83. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  12. ^ a b "Milner Buys WBYG", Radio & Records, January 20, 1984. p. 3. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  13. ^ "Application Search Details", fcc.gov. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  14. ^ a b "Pilot Alert: Beware of Flying Bus", The Southern Illinoisan. June 17, 1985. p. 3.
  15. ^ a b Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988. Retrieved July 14, 2018.
  16. ^ a b Chicago Radio Guide, Vol. 1, Issue 1. May 1985. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  17. ^ "Regional AOR Activity", Radio & Records, July 26, 1985. p. 66. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  18. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1986, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1986. p. B-88. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  19. ^ "Look out for a flying bus...It's serious". Bluefield Daily Telegraph. Associated Press. June 17, 1985. p. 1. Retrieved July 27, 2018.
  20. ^ Broadcasting/Cable Yearbook 1989, Broadcasting/Cable, 1989. p. B-93. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  21. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 1996, Broadcasting & Cable, 1996. p. B-129. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  22. ^ a b "Radio Station Index by Format", Radio Chicago, Spring 1991. p. 2. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  23. ^ a b "WBUS FM 99.9", Radio Chicago, Fall 1990. p. 49. Retrieved July 14, 2018.
  24. ^ "Weekend & Varied Programming Schedules", Chicago Airwaves. November/December 1993. December 1993. p. 17. Retrieved July 14, 2018.
  25. ^ Brown, Lana. "Lana Brown: Local memories of Casey Kasem", Daily Journal, June 21, 2014. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  26. ^ "WBUS FM 99.9", Radio Chicago, Winter 1991. p. 49. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  27. ^ The M Street Journal, July 3, 1996. p. 8. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  28. ^ "100.7 The Bus - Today's Hottest Hits". WBVS. Archived from the original on October 10, 2000. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  29. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 15 No. 14. April 8, 1998. p. 1. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  30. ^ Riera, Alejandro. "11th Viva! Chicago Fest Should Be Among The Best", Chicago Tribune, August 20, 1999. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  31. ^ Elving, Bruce F. (1997). FM Atlas, Seventeenth Edition. p. 198. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  32. ^ Unmacht, Robert; McCrummen, Pat (1998). The M-Street Radio Directory. p. 213. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  33. ^ "Signs of the Times", Radio & Records, 30th Anniversary Issue. 2003. p. 113. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  34. ^ Obejas, Achy. "All Mexican, All The Time", Chicago Tribune, January 05, 2001. Retrieved July 27, 2018.
  35. ^ a b Jacobson, Adam. "Entravision Exits Windy City", Radio & Records, January 23, 2004. p. 4. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  36. ^ Apel, Steve; Devine, Cathy (2001-2002). The M-Street Radio Directory. p. 190. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  37. ^ Technical Statement Concerning Application for Modification of License, du Treil, Lundin & Rackley, Inc. fcc.gov. May 11, 2001. Retrieved July 9, 2018.
  38. ^ a b Lazaroff, Leon. "Democratic donor plans to purchase 3 stations", Chicago Tribune, July 27, 2004. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  39. ^ a b Devine, Cathy (2005-2006). The Radio Book. p. 202. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  40. ^ a b c Kampert, Patrick. "Nine FM rolls out 'anything' format on 3 frequencies", Chicago Tribune, December 02, 2004. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  41. ^ a b Dance Factory, Nine FM. Internet Archive. Archived June 14, 2006. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  42. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "'Nine FM' filling void with club-style music every night of the week", Chicago Sun-Times, May 10, 2007. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  43. ^ a b Rosenthal, Phil. "'Nine FM' consolidates -- who's left?", Chicago Tribune, October 18, 2008. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  44. ^ a b Venta, Lance. "Chicago Liberal Talker To Shift FM Signals To Brokered Polish", Radio Insight. May 5, 2014. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  45. ^ "WCPT/Chicago Gets FM Simulcasts". Radio Ink. October 17, 2008. Archived from the original on October 27, 2008.
  46. ^ "Nine FM/Chicago To Simulcast WCPT Talk", All Access Music Group. October 17, 2008. Retrieve July 10, 2018.
  47. ^ Rosenthal, Phil. "Harvey Wells to step down from Newsweb Radio in February", Chicago Tribune, December 15, 2009. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
  48. ^ Feder, Robert. "Newsweb Radio streamlines WCPT talk simulcast", robertfeder.com. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  49. ^ "Polski FM - 92.7 FM & 640 AM - Chicago". Polski FM. Archived from the original on July 12, 2018. Retrieved December 9, 2018.
  50. ^ "Polski Parting Now Official", Radio+Television Business Report. June 1, 2018. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  51. ^ Venta, Lance. "Bible Broadcasting Acquires WCPQ Park Forest IL", Radio Insight. March 20, 2018. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  52. ^ Asset Purchase Agreement, fcc.gov. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  53. ^ "Application Search Details", fcc.gov. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  54. ^ WYHI – Park Forest / Chicago - 99.9 FM, Bible Broadcasting Network. Retrieved July 11, 2018.

External links[edit]


Coordinates: 41°18′04″N 87°49′35″W / 41.301109°N 87.826395°W / 41.301109; -87.826395