WCPY

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WCPY
WCPY PolskiFM92.7-99.9 logo.png
WCPY DanceFactory92.7-99.9 logo.jpg
Broadcast areaChicago metropolitan area
Frequency92.7 MHz
BrandingDaytime: Polski FM
Nighttime: Dance Factory FM
Programming
FormatDaytime: Polish
Nighttime: Dance Hits
Ownership
OwnerNewsweb Corporation
History
First air date
March 10, 1960[1]
Former call signs
WNWC (1960-1968)[2]
WEXI (1968-1972)[2]
WWMM (1972-1981)[2]
WTCO (1981–1983)
WSEX (1983-1989)
WCBR-FM (1989–1998)
WKIE (1998–2008)
WCPT-FM (2008-2014)[3]
Call sign meaning
"Chicago's Progressive Talk" (previous format)
Technical information
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID15520
ClassA
ERP1,800 watts
HAAT116 meters (381 ft)
Links
Public license information
WebsitePolski FM's website
Dance Factory FM's website

WCPY (92.7 FM) is a radio station licensed to Arlington Heights, Illinois, and serving the Chicago area. WCPY airs a Polish language format during the daytime, as "Polski FM", while airing a Dance Hits format at night known as "Dance Factory FM". Studios are located on Chicago's Northwest Side.

The station is owned by Newsweb Corporation. WCPY transmits on a tower with WPPN and WPNA-FM in nearby Buffalo Grove at 1,800 watts.

History[edit]

WNWC[edit]

The station began broadcasting on March 10, 1960, holding the call sign WNWC ("North West Communities").[1][4][5] In July 1961, the station was purchased by Bob Atcher and Thomas Hogan.[4][6] WNWC would air a wide variety of non-rock music.[4] It aired four hours of country music a day before increasing it to 12 hours a day in November 1963.[7] In 1965, Lester Vihon purchased the station for $110,000.[4] By 1966, it was airing hard rock evenings.[8] The station was off the air temporarily in June 1966, after a tornado toppled its tower.[8] In early 1968, the station was sold to auto dealer Walter Mack for $150,000.[4][9]

WEXI[edit]

In April 1968, the station's call sign was changed to WEXI, and was branded "Stereo Excitement".[2][10] WEXI aired easy listening music during the day and a progressive rock format overnight.[11][12] Shortly thereafter, it adopted a top 40 format.[13][4] In November 1970, the station adopted a beautiful music format, with the slogan "Spreading Clean Air over Chicagoland".[13][4][14]

WWMM[edit]

In autumn 1972, the station was sold to Community Broadcasters for $230,000, and its call sign was changed to WWMM.[15][2] WWMM aired contemporary middle of the road music, along with some talk programs.[4][16][17] Among the shows on WWMM in this period was "Love in the Afternoon", a sex talk program hosted by Jonathan Kingsley.[17] By 1976, the station had adopted a jazz format.[4][18] In 1976, the station was sold to Northwest Community Broadcasting for $500,000.[19][2] By 1977, WWMM was airing a MOR-adult contemporary format, with the slogan "Radio for the Great Northwest".[20][21][22]

WTCO[edit]

In spring of 1981, the station was sold to Radio Communications Group and its call sign was changed to WTCO.[2][3][4] WTCO aired a country music format.[4][23] In 1982, the station was sold to Darrell Peters Productions for $550,000.[24][25]

WSEX[edit]

Darrell Peters Productions applied to change the station's call sign to WSEX on September 26, 1982, but the application was rejected.[26] An application to reconsider was submitted, and the call sign change was approved on January 24, 1983.[26][27][28][3] WSEX aired an adult contemporary format called "Love Songs & More".[29] In January 1986, the station adopted a "Top 10" format, playing songs that had reached the top 10 within the past five years.[30][31][32]

WCBR-FM[edit]

The station became "Chicago's Bear", and its call sign was changed to WCBR-FM on January 9, 1989.[3][33] WCBR-FM aired an adult album alternative format.[34][35][36] As the 90's progressed, it began to air brokered programming nights and weekends.[36] WCBR-FM also aired Chicago Wolves hockey.[36][37]

In 1998, the station was sold to Big City Radio for $17 million.[38] Many of the brokered programs that were on WCBR-FM moved to 94.3 WJKL in Elgin.[38] Purchased by Big City Radio at the same time was 92.7 WLRA in Kankakee.[39] When Big City Radio took control of the two stations, they stunted with a simulcast of their Los Angeles sister station 107.1 KLYY, which aired a modern rock format.[40] WLRA's call sign was changed to WBRO shortly thereafter.[41]

92 Kiss FM[edit]

92 Kiss FM logo

On November 14, 1998, at Noon, WCBR and WBRO launched their new official format, CHR as "92.7 Kiss FM", with the first song being "Kiss" by Prince.[42][43][44] This would be Chicago's first true CHR station in many years and proved to be quite successful, even with the two stations' weak signals.[42][37][43] In late December 1998, the station's call sign was changed to WKIE, while WBRO's call sign was changed to WKIF.[3][41] Big City Radio also purchased WDEK 92.5 in DeKalb, Illinois, which was airing a locally programmed CHR format at the time, and switched it to a simulcast of WKIE and WKIF in early 1999.[45] Not long after, the moniker was adjusted to "92 Kiss FM".[46] Melissa Forman hosted mornings on 92 Kiss FM, before moving to 93.9 WLIT-FM in 2001.[47][48]

Energy 92.7&5[edit]

On January 12, 2001, Clear Channel's WUBT changed formats from rhythmic oldies to CHR as WKSC-FM "Kiss 103.5".[49] At that time, Clear Channel filed suit against Big City Radio, alleging the "Kiss FM" branding used by WKIE and its simulcasts violated its national trademark.[49][50] However, Big City Radio had already planned on changing the formats of these stations.[50] On January 26, 2001, 92 Kiss-FM signed off, and the three stations adopted a dance hits format as "Energy 92.7&5".[50][51] The station's airstaff remained intact.[52][53] The new format was designed by 92 Kiss FM's program director, Chris Shebel, who has stated that the dance hits format is something he had dreamed of doing for a long time.[50]

Onda 92[edit]

In late 2002, Big City Radio, became insolvent and began the process of selling all of its radio stations.[54] In early 2003, WKIE, WKIF and WDEK were sold to Spanish Broadcasting System for $22 million.[55] On January 6, 2003, the three stations adopted a Spanish contemporary format as "Onda 92".[56][57][58][59]

Nine FM / Dance Factory[edit]

In 2004, Spanish Broadcasting System sold WKIE, WKIF and WDEK to Newsweb Corporation for $28 million.[60][61] At 9 a.m. November 29, 2004, WKIE and WDEK began simulcasting with its new adult hits sister station 99.9 WRZA in Park Forest, Illinois as "Nine FM", with the slogan "We Play Anything".[62][63] The first song on the Nine FM simulcast was "With or Without You" by U2.[62] Sky Daniels was the original program director for Nine FM.[62] When he left in 2005, he was replaced by Matt DuBiel.[63]

In 2006, Chris Chudzik began leasing air time for a dance music show called Dance Factory.[64][65] Initially airing overnight on Saturdays,[64] the program was expanded to seven nights a week on May 14, 2007.[65] Dance Factory has continued to air overnight on the station, even as its daytime format has changed.[66][67]

Chicago's Progressive Talk[edit]

Newsweb Corporation dropped the Nine FM programming on all three signals on October 20, 2008, and replaced it with a simulcast of sister station WCPT from 5 a.m. until 9 p.m.[68][66] The Nine FM format moved to WKIF 92.7 in Kankakee.[69] On October 27, 2008, the station changed its callsign from WKIE to WCPT-FM, to go with the format.[3]

Polski FM[edit]

On June 2, 2014, WCPT-FM and 99.9 WCPQ broke away from the Progressive Talk simulcast and changed their daytime format to Polish, branded as "Polski FM".[67][70] WCPT-FM then swapped callsigns with 92.5 WCPY in DeKalb, which remained part of the Progressive Talk simulcast.[3][70] In 2018, 99.9 WCPQ was sold to Bible Broadcasting Network, and it adopted a Christian format as WYHI.[71] Polski FM was then briefly simulcast on 640 WMFN in the summer of 2018.[72]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 1964 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1964. p. B-47. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g History Cards for WCPY, fcc.gov. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Call Sign History (WCPY)". Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Ghrist, John R. (1996). Valley Voices: A Radio History. Crossroads Communications. p. 327-330.
  5. ^ "County Approves FM Tower". Arlington Heights Herald. July 30, 1959.
  6. ^ "Schaumburg Residents Purchase FM Station", Arlington Heights Herald. July 27, 1961.
  7. ^ Sachs, Bill. "With the Country Jockeys", Billboard. November 30, 1963. p. 20. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  8. ^ a b "From the Music Capitals of the World", Billboard. June 25, 1966. p. 36. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  9. ^ "Mack Buys Radio Station WNWC-FM". Mount Prospect Herald. January 26, 1968. p. 1.
  10. ^ "WEXI Stereo Excitement 92.7", The Herald. March 27, 1969. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  11. ^ "WEXI-FM in New Format", Billboard. May 4, 1968. p. 22. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  12. ^ "Stations Playing Progressive Rock", Billboard. July 27, 1968. p. 44. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  13. ^ a b "WEXI-FM Swings to MOR Format", Billboard. November 14, 1970. p. 26. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  14. ^ "Good Moods", The Herald. February 15, 1971. Section 1, p. 3.
  15. ^ "Ownership Changes", Broadcasting. October 30, 1972. p. 58. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  16. ^ 1974 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1974. p. B-60-61. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  17. ^ a b Mahsman, David. "'New-Old' FM Station Brings 'Sexy Radio' to Town", The Herald. November 3, 1972.
  18. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1976, Broadcasting, 1976. p. C-56. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  19. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. August 23, 1976. p. 70. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  20. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1977, Broadcasting, 1977. p. C-59. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  21. ^ "Great Music Survey For Week Ending: 6/3/78", WM WWMM FM 92.7. June 3, 1978. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  22. ^ "Stations, everywhere: a listeners' guide to the AM and FM bands", Chicago Tribune Magazine, March 4, 1979. p. 35. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  23. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1982, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1982. p. C-67. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  24. ^ Public Notice Comment - BALH-19820528EZ, fcc.gov. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  25. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. September 13, 1982. p. 88. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  26. ^ a b "Sex Appeal: Illinois Asks FCC to Sanction WSEX Change", Billboard. November 20, 1982. p. 12. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  27. ^ Holland, Bill. "FCC Keeps Hands Off WSEX Change Operation", Billboard. February 5, 1983. p. 10. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  28. ^ "FCC Approves WSEX Calls", Radio & Records. January 28, 1983. p. 4. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  29. ^ Chicago Radio Guide, Vol. 1, Issue 1. May 1985. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  30. ^ "Change is the constant in suburban radio game", The Sunday Herald. October 26, 1986. Section 1, p. 9. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  31. ^ Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  32. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1987, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1987. p. B-84. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  33. ^ Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Spring-Summer 1989. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  34. ^ Kening, Dan. "New Neighbor", Chicago Tribune. August 6, 1991. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  35. ^ Kening, Dan. "Talk O' the Towns", Chicago Tribune. November 03, 1991. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  36. ^ a b c Kening, Dan. "Riding a New Sound Wave", Chicago Tribune. January 15, 1995. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  37. ^ a b Galo, Maria T. "Suburban Voice Moving", Chicago Tribune. June 25, 1999. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  38. ^ a b Kirk, Jim. Channel 7 May Snag NBC Seattle News Chief", Chicago Tribune. July 2, 1998. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  39. ^ "Big City Buys Four More In Chicago", Radio & Records. April 24, 1998. p. 4. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  40. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 15, No. 31. August 5, 1998. p. 1-2. Retrieved December 8, 2018.
  41. ^ a b Call Sign History (WVLI), fcc.gov. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  42. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "'Kiss FM' set to debut 'in your face' attitude", Chicago Sun-Times. November 12, 1998. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  43. ^ a b "WCBR Becomes 92.7 Kiss FM", Format Change Archive. November 14, 1998. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  44. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 15, No. 46. November 18, 1998. p. 1. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  45. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 16, No. 9. March 3, 1999. p. 2. Retrieved December 5, 2018.
  46. ^ "92.7 KISS fm". 92 Kiss FM. Archived from the original on February 29, 2000. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  47. ^ "Melissa Forman". 92 Kiss FM. Archived from the original on March 4, 2000. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  48. ^ Rosenthal, Phil. "Melissa Forman out at WLIT-FM -- again", Chicago Tribune. August 13, 2009. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  49. ^ a b "M Street Bazaar... People, Products, and Programming", The M Street Journal. Vol. 18, No. 03. January 17, 2001. p. 8. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  50. ^ a b c d Ross, Sean "Shebel Energizes WKIE With Dance", Billboard. February 17, 2001. p. 63-64. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  51. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 18, No. 05. January 31, 2001. p. 1-2. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  52. ^ "KISS On Air". 92 Kiss FM. Archived from the original on December 4, 2000. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  53. ^ "Energy Personalities". Energy 92 7/5. Archived from the original on April 10, 2001. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  54. ^ "Big City Radio Announces Auction Of Stations", HispanicAd.com. October 05, 2002. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  55. ^ Oppelaar, Justin. "Spanish B'casting picks up Chi trio", Variety. January 3, 2003. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  56. ^ "Analysts React To Big City Sell-Off", Radio & Records. pp. 4 & 6. January 10, 2003. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  57. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 2003-2004, Broadcasting & Cable, 2003-2004. p. D-141. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  58. ^ "Latin Music 6 Pack", Billboard. February 22, 2003. p. LM-2. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  59. ^ "Onda 92". Onda 92. Archived from the original on July 19, 2003. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  60. ^ "SBS Closes $28 Million Sale of Chicago FMs to Newsweb", RadioWorld. November 30, 2004. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  61. ^ Lazaroff, Leon. "Democratic donor plans to purchase 3 stations", Chicago Tribune, July 27, 2004. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  62. ^ a b c Kampert, Patrick. "Nine FM rolls out 'anything' format on 3 frequencies", Chicago Tribune, December 02, 2004. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  63. ^ a b Devine, Cathy (2005-2006). The Radio Book. p. 187. Retrieved December, 2018.
  64. ^ a b "Dance Factory". Nine FM. Archived from the original on June 14, 2006. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  65. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "'Nine FM' filling void with club-style music every night of the week", Chicago Sun-Times, May 10, 2007. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  66. ^ a b Rosenthal, Phil. "'Nine FM' consolidates -- who's left?", Chicago Tribune, October 18, 2008. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  67. ^ a b Venta, Lance. "Chicago Liberal Talker To Shift FM Signals To Brokered Polish", Radio Insight. May 5, 2014. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  68. ^ "WCPT/Chicago Gets FM Simulcasts". Radio Ink. October 17, 2008. Archived from the original on October 27, 2008.
  69. ^ Rosenthal, Phil. "Harvey Wells to step down from Newsweb Radio in February", Chicago Tribune, December 15, 2009. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  70. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "Newsweb Radio streamlines WCPT talk simulcast", robertfeder.com. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  71. ^ Venta, Lance. "Bible Broadcasting Acquires WCPQ Park Forest IL", Radio Insight. March 20, 2018. Retrieved December 9, 2018.
  72. ^ "Polski FM - 92.7 FM & 640 AM - Chicago". Polski FM. Archived from the original on July 12, 2018. Retrieved December 9, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 42°08′14″N 87°58′57″W / 42.137091°N 87.982496°W / 42.137091; -87.982496