Wheelchair rugby at the 2012 Summer Paralympics

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Wheelchair rugby
at the XIV Paralympic Games
Wheelchair rugby pictogram (Paralympics).svg
Paralympic wheelchair rugby
Venue Basketball Arena
Dates 5–9 September 2012
Competitors 96 (8 teams)
Medalists
Gold medal    Australia
Silver medal    Canada
Bronze medal    United States
2008 2016

Wheelchair rugby at the 2012 Summer Paralympics was held in the Basketball Arena from 5 September to 9 September. There was one event[1] where 8 teams competed.[2] Though technically a mixed gender event the vast majority of competitors at the games were male.[3]

Qualification[edit]

A NPC may enter one team. The host country directly qualifies, as long as it has a rank on the IWRF Wheelchair Rugby World Ranking List, [1] closing 31 January 2012.

Also two qualification spots goes to the top two NPCs on the ranking list that are not otherwise qualified.[2]

History of Wheelchair Rugby

1977: Wheelchair rugby was invented by a group of tetraplegic athletes in 1977 in Winnipeg, Canada as an alternative to wheelchair basketball. They desired a sport that allowed athletes with both arm and leg function to participate equally.

1979: As wheelchair rugby grew in popularity throughout Canada, it made its first appearance outside of Canada as a demonstration sport at Southwest State University in Minnesota, USA. The first Canadian National Championship was held in the same year.

1981: First USA representative team was formed.

1982: First international tournament that brought together various teams from the USA and Canada was held. From this point on, other local and national tournaments took place in various countries.

1989: Great Britain became the first team outside of the continent to compete against Canada and USA in a tournament in Toronto, Canada.

1990: Wheelchair Rugby appeared at the World Wheelchair Games in Stoke Mandeville, Great Britain as an exhibition event, which generated further interest, growth and popularity in the sport internationally. Seven countries competed in this event.

1993: Fifteen countries were competing in wheelchair rugby, and it was recognised as an internationally official sport for athletes with impairments.

1994: Wheelchair Rugby was first officially recognised by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).

1995: The first Wheelchair Rugby World Championships were held in Nottwill, Switzerland, with eight teams competing.

1996: Wheelchair rugby was included as a demonstration sport in the Atlanta Paralympic Games, with six teams competing.

1998: As the sport continued to develop, Toronto hosted the second IWRF Wheelchair Rugby World Championship, with 12 countries competing.

2000: Wheelchair rugby was first included in the Paralympic programme at the Sydney Olympics.

The USA won Paralympic golds in the Sydney 2000 Paralympics and the Beijing 2008 Paralympics; New Zealand took the title in the Athens 2004 Paralympics; and Australia won in London 2012. Currently, there are more than 40 countries that actively participate in the sport or who are developing programmes within their nation.

Qualified Means of qualification Date Venue Berths
 Great Britain Host country 1
 United States 2010 IWRF Wheelchair Rugby World Championships 21–26 September 2010 Canada Vancouver[4] 1
 Canada 2011 IWRF Wheelchair Rugby Zonal Championships – Americas 18–25 September 2011 Colombia Bogotá[5] 1
 Sweden
 Belgium
2011 IWRF Wheelchair Rugby Zonal Championships – European 1–9 October 2011 Switzerland Nottwil[5] 2
 Australia 2011 IWRF Wheelchair Rugby Zonal Championships – Asia, Oceania 2–10 November 2011 South Korea Seoul[5] 1
 Japan
 France
IWRF Wheelchair Rugby World Ranking 31 January 2012 2

Teams[edit]

Eight teams took part in this sport. Each team could have up to 12 athletes.

Calendar[edit]

September 5 / 6 / 7 8 9
Phase Preliminary
Round
Classification 5-8
Placement 5-6 & 7-8
Semifinals 1
Gold Medal Match
Bronze Medal Match

Tournament[6][edit]

All times are British Summer Time (UTC+1).

Preliminary Round[edit]

Group A[edit]

Qualified for the semifinals
Eliminated
Team
Pld W D L G GA GD Pts
 United States (USA) 3 3 0 0 190 136 +54 6
 Japan (JPN) 3 2 0 1 164 159 +5 4
 Great Britain (GBR) 3 1 0 2 140 157 –17 2
 France (FRA) 3 0 0 3 150 192 –42 0


5 September 2012
14:00
v
United States  56 – 44 Great Britain
Aoki 14
Groulx 9
Team 7
McBride 6
Sumner 5
A. Cohn 5
Scaturro 3
Helton 2
Delagrave 2
Regier 1
C. Cohn 1
Springer 1
Report Phipps 16
Anthony 11
Brown 5
Morrison 5
Barrow 3
Kerr 2
Sehmi 1
Team 1
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 8,273
Referee: Pierre-Alexandre Brière (CAN), Chris van de Riet (NED)

5 September 2012
21:15
v
Japan  65 – 56 France
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 3,642
Referee: Mitch Carr (USA), Alexander Schreiner (GER)

6 September 2012
19:00
v
Great Britain  57 – 50 France
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 5,186
Referee: Motoko Izumiya (JPN), Darren Roberts (USA)

6 September 2012
21:15
v
Japan  48 – 64 United States
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 2,959
Referee: Philip Washbourn (NZL), Dave Woods (GBR)

7 September 2012
15:00
v
Great Britain  39 – 51 Japan
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 8,458
Referee: Mitch Carr (USA), Philip Washbourn (NZL)

7 September 2012
17:15
v
United States  70 – 44 France
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 6,259
Referee: Pierre-Alexandre Brière (CAN), Dave Woods (GBR)

Group B[edit]

Qualified for the semifinals
Eliminated
Team
Pld W D L G GA GD Pts
 Australia (AUS) 3 3 0 0 182 142 +40 6
 Canada (CAN) 3 2 0 1 163 166 –3 4
 Sweden (SWE) 3 1 0 2 151 155 –4 2
 Belgium (BEL) 3 0 0 3 135 168 –33 0


5 September 2012
16:15
v
Sweden  52 – 42 Belgium
Uhlmann 15
Hjert 9
Jansson 7
Sandberg 6
Kulle 5
Norlin 4
Team 4
Collin 2
Report Mertens 20
Verhaegen 9
Genyn 6
Vanacker 3
Team 2
Budeners 1
Meersschaut 1
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 4,404
Referee: Motoko Izumiya (JPN), Philip Washbourn (NZL)

5 September 2012
19:00
v
Australia  64 – 52 Canada
Batt 37
Bond 10
Team 4
Carr 3
Harrison 3
Smith 2
Newton 1
Hose 1
Lees 1
Meakin 1
Scott 1
Report Lavoie 9
Hirschfield 8
Crone 7
Madell 7
Hickling 6
Whitehead 5
Willsie 4
Dagenais 2
Chan 2
Simard 2
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 5,539
Referee: Darren Roberts (USA), Dave Woods (GBR)

6 September 2012
14:00
v
Sweden  47 – 60 Australia
Uhlmann 9
Norlin 8
Kulle 7
Hjelt 7
Collin 6
Team 4
Sandberg 3
Jansson 2
Wahlberg 1
Report Batt 30
Bond 14
Team 4
Carr 3
Newton 2
Smith 2
Harrison 2
Hose 1
Lees 1
Meakin 1
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 5,622
Referee: Pierre-Alexandre Brière (CAN), Alexander Schreiner (GER)

6 September 2012
16:15
v
Canada  58 – 50 Belgium
Madell 18
Hickling 9
Hirschfield 9
Lavoie 5
Chan 4
Whitehead 3
Simard 3
Team 3
Willsie 2
Funk 1
Report Mertens 24
Genyn 10
Verhaegen 5
Budeners 4
Team 4
Vanacker 3
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 6,225
Referee: Mitch Carr (USA), Chris van de Riet (NED)

7 September 2012
10:00
v
Australia  58 – 43 Belgium
Batt 29
Carr 11
Bond 9
Smith 4
Hose 1
Lees 1
Meakin 1
Harrison 1
Team 1
Report Mertens 14
Genyn 11
Verhaegen 5
Hendrix 4
Team 4
Budeners 3
Vanacker 2
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 2,822
Referee: Motoko Izumiya (JPN), Chris van de Riet (NED)

7 September 2012
12:15
v
Canada  53 – 52 Sweden
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 5,469
Referee: Darren Roberts (USA), Alexander Schreiner (GER)

Classification[edit]

Paralympic sport exists so that athletes with a disability have equal opportunities to compete and be successful in sport. The purpose of classification is to ensure fair and equitable competition at all levels of sport and to allow athletes to compete at the highest level, regardless of individual differences in physical function. Originally, classification systems were based on medical diagnoses rather than each athlete’s functional capacity. However more recent systems of classification are based on the athlete’s functional capacity to perform specific movements unique to each sport. This ensures that strategies and skills of the athletes competing in the sport are the deciding factors of success, rather than the discrepancies in various impairments. Each Paralympic sport has a different classification system.

Wheelchair rugby was originally designed for athletes with tetraplegia, which is the paralysis of both the arms and legs. Today, the sport also includes players with impaired upper and lower limb movement as a result of different conditions including muscular dystrophy and various types of central and peripheral nervous system conditions. Athletes with conditions such as multiple amputations and congenital limb defects also participate. Athletes with an eligible impairment are allocated a sport class based on their abilities in performing the skills of ball handling, such as passing, catching, carrying and dribbling, and wheelchair skills including pushing, starting, stopping, directional changes, tackling and blocking.

Each player’s classification is determined by a classifier that observes and tests the player’s movements. The classifiers test the athletes’ limbs for strength, flexibility, sensation, and muscle tone. Each athlete’s trunk is tested for balance, ability to bend over and rise up and the ability to rotate to both sides. Athletes are then observed performing ball handling and wheelchair skills.

Athletes are then placed into one of seven classes ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 based on the functional capabilities observed in each athlete’s testing. Athletes are placed into the class 0.5 if they are considered to demonstrate the most disability, and athletes are placed into the class 3.5 if they are observed with the least disability or minimal disability eligible to play wheelchair rugby. The total amount of classification points from the combined players allowed on the court at any one time is 8.0. A team may compete with combinations adding to less than 8.0, however no higher.

Bracket
Classification round Fifth place
8 September 2012 - 09:30
  Great Britain  54  
  Belgium  49  
 
8 September 2012 - 21:15
      Great Britain  59
    Sweden  47
Seventh place
8 September 2012 - 11:45 8 September 2012 - 19:00
  Sweden  58   Belgium  54
  France  48     France  50

5-8th place Semifinals[edit]

8 September 2012
14:00
v
Great Britain  54 – 49 Belgium
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 1,567
Referee: Pierre-Alexandre Brière (CAN), Philip Washbourn (NZL)

8 September 2012
14:00
v
Sweden  58 – 48 France
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 2,994
Referee: Motoko Izumiya (JPN), Dave Woods (GBR)

Seventh place Match[edit]

8 September 2012
19:00
v
Belgium  54 – 50 France
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 1,734
Referee: Philip Washbourn (NZL), Dave Woods (GBR)

Fifth place Match[edit]

8 September 2012
21:15
v
Great Britain  59 – 47 Sweden
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 2,484
Referee: Mitch Carr (USA), Alexander Schreiner (GER)

Medal round[edit]

Bracket
Semifinals Gold medal match
8 September 2012 - 16:15
  United States  49  
  Canada  50  
 
9 September 2012 - 14:15
      Canada  51
    Australia  66
Bronze medal match
8 September 2012 - 14:00 9 September 2012 - 12:00
  Australia  59   United States  53
  Japan  45     Japan  43

Semifinals[edit]

8 September 2012
14:00
v
Australia  59 – 45 Japan
Batt 27
Bond 14
Smith 6
Scott 2
Lees 2
Meakin 2
Newton 1
Carr 1
Harrison 1
Team 3
Report Ikezakli 24
Nakazato 7
Kanno 6
Shimakawa 4
Sato 2
Team 2
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 5,333
Referee: Mitch Carr (USA), Darren Roberts (USA)

8 September 2012
16:15
v
United States  49 – 50 Canada
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 4,324
Referee: Alexander Schreiner (GER), Chris van de Riet (NED)

Bronze Medal Match[edit]

9 September 2012
12:00
v
United States  53 – 43 Japan
Report
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 7,852
Referee: Pierre-Alexandre Briére (CAN), Philip Washbourn (NZL)

Gold Medal Match[edit]

9 September 2012
14:15
v
Canada  51 – 66 Australia
Madell 11
Hickling 7
Whitehead 7
Murao 6
Chan 5
Willsie 4
Simard 3
Lavoie 2
Dagenais 1
Hirschfield 1
Team 4
Report Batt 37
Bond 15
Carr 4
Smith 2
Scott 1
Lees 1
Meakin 1
Newton 1
Harrison 1
Team 3
Basketball Arena
Attendance: 9,048
Referee: Darren Roberts (USA), Chris van de Riet (NED)

Ranking[edit]

Place Team
1st, gold medalist(s) Australia
2nd, silver medalist(s) Canada
3rd, bronze medalist(s) United States
4. Japan
5. Great Britain
6. Sweden
7. Belgium
8. France

Medalists[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Mixed team  Australia (AUS)

Ben Newton
Nazim Erdem
Ryley Batt
Josh Hose
Jason Lees
Cody Meakin
Greg Smith
Chris Bond
Ryan Scott (captain)
Cameron Carr
Andrew Harrison
Coach: Brad Dubberley

 Canada (CAN)

Jason Crone
Patrice Dagenais
Garett Hickling
Ian Chan
Mike Whitehead
Trevor Hirschfield
Fabien Lavoie
Travis Murao
Jared Funk
David Willsie (captain)
Patrice Simard
Zak Madell
Coach: Kevin Orr

 United States (USA)

Chance Sumner
Seth McBride
Adam Scaturro
Chuck Aoki
Jason Regier
Scott Hogsett
Nick Springer
Will Groulx (captain)
Andy Cohn
Chad Cohn
Derrick Helton
Joe Delagrave
Coach: James Gumbert

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wheelchair Rugby - Official website
  2. ^ a b Qualification Criteria – WR, International Paralympic Committee, 2010.
  3. ^ "Wheelchair Rugby - Athletes". London 2012. Retrieved September 6, 2012. 
  4. ^ 2010 WWRC, Official website of the 2010 World Wheelchair Rugby Championships – Vancouver, Canada.
  5. ^ a b c Global Rugby Calendar, International Wheelchair Rugby Federation (IWRF).
  6. ^ "Wheelchair Rugby Mixed TOURNAMENT SUMMARY" (PDF). London 2012. Retrieved September 7, 2012. 

External links[edit]