Yaron Brook

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Yaron Brook
Yaron Brook.jpg
Native name
ירון ברוק
Born (1961-05-23) May 23, 1961 (age 61)
Israel
OccupationChairman of the Board at the Ayn Rand Institute
CitizenshipAmerican, Israeli
EducationTechnion – Israel Institute of Technology (BS)
University of Texas at Austin (MBA, PhD)
Literary movementObjectivism
Notable worksIn Pursuit of Wealth
Equal Is Unfair
Free Market Revolution
Why Businessmen Need Philosophy
NEOCONSERVATISM
Winning the Unwinnable War
Website
yaronbrookshow.com

Yaron Brook (Hebrew: ירון ברוק; born May 23, 1961)[1] is an Israeli-American entrepreneur, writer, and activist. He is an Objectivist and the current chairman of the board at the Ayn Rand Institute, where he was executive director from 2000 to 2017. He is also the co-founder of BHZ Capital Management LP.[2]

Biography[edit]

Yaron Brook was born and raised in Israel. His parents were Jewish socialists from South Africa. When he was sixteen, a friend lent him a copy of Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged, leading him to abandon the socialism taught to him by his parents and to embrace Objectivism.[3] After graduating from high school, he served as a first sergeant in Israeli military intelligence (1979–1982) and then earned a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering in 1986 from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa.[4] In 1987, he moved to the United States, where he received his Master of Business Administration in 1989 and PhD in finance in 1994 from the University of Texas at Austin. Yaron Brook is married and has 2 grown children.

Academic and business career[edit]

Brook began his career as a finance professor at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University, a position he held for seven years and which won him awards of recognition.

In 1998, he co-founded BH Equity Research with Robert Hendershott. BH Equity Management was a financial advisory firm. In 2019, BH Equity dissolved and BHZ Capital Management LP became the new entity.[5]

Brook became an associate of leading Objectivist intellectuals, such as philosopher Leonard Peikoff, and in 1994, he co-founded Lyceum International, a company that organized Objectivist conferences and offered distance-learning courses. In 2000, he left Santa Clara University to succeed Michael Berliner as President and Executive Director of the Ayn Rand Institute, which was then located in Marina del Rey, California. In 2002, ARI relocated to Irvine, California.[6]

Brook speaks and debates at numerous American universities, delivering seminars for businesses and corporations in the United States and abroad, and writing opinion editorials for leading newspapers and websites. Speaking venues include conferences, professional organizations, and community groups. His subjects span a wide range of current events and philosophical issues, including the causes of the financial crisis, the morality of capitalism, and ending the growth of the state, each discussed with Objectivism at its foundation. In recent years, he has spoken to audiences throughout the world, including those in China, Australia, Brazil,[7] Argentina,[8] Greece,[9] Iceland, Bulgaria, Israel,[10] Guatemala,[11] and England.[12]

Brook was a columnist for Forbes,[13] and his articles have been featured in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Investor's Business Daily, and many other publications. A frequent guest on a variety of radio and national television programs, he is the co-author of Neoconservatism: An Obituary for an Idea and Free Market Revolution: How Ayn Rand's Ideas Can End Big Government, and contributing author of Winning the Unwinnable War: America's Self-Crippled Response to Islamic Totalitarianism. His newest book is In Pursuit of Wealth: The Moral Case for Finance, co-authored with Don Watkins.[14]

The Yaron Brook Show[edit]

On January 7, 2015, the day of the Charlie Hebdo shooting,[15] Brook made his first-ever podcast and premiered The Yaron Brook Show.[16]

The program does not have a set schedule. However, the program is livestreamed on many social-media platforms, approximately, four times/week. When Brook is home, scheduled programs are more predictably livestreamed. When Brook is on the road, scheduled programs are more intermittent.

Events[edit]

Brook speaks at events hosted by private companies, student organizations and non-profits in America and internationally.

Brook is a contributor, and frequent speaker at events, with The Federalist Society.[17][18]

On September 27, 2017, at the Yale Student Chapter of The Federalist Society, Brook participated in an event named, "Income Inequality: Is It Fair or Unfair?".[19] This debate is the most watched video, ever, on The Federalist Society's YouTube channel.

Podcasts[edit]

Through the years, Brook has produced many shows, on many types of issues.[20] Some of these shows have been made into series.

In something of an answer(s) to Jordan Peterson's Rules for Life, in April of 2021, Brook made a show on his rules for living. The show was a hit and became the launchpad for a series.

The shows are given unique titles, describing the program's topic. Don't Stop Moving, Being Optimistic in a Crazy World, and, most recently, Cultivating the Virtue of Justice, are just some examples of what the series tackles.

As of June, 2022, sixteen podcasts have been produced for this series.[21]

Ingenuism[edit]

On January 19, 2021, Brook, along with Robert Hendershott and Don Watkins,[22] launched Ingenuism[23] on Substack.[24] To introduce themselves, the title of their first post was, "Progress at the speed of thought".[25]

Views and opinions[edit]

Rational selfishness[edit]

Brook promotes the Objectivist ethical position that rational selfishness[26] is a moral virtue and that altruism[27] is evil. Yaron Lectures: The Morality of Selfishness a talk for Cheongshim International Academy[28] and Yaron Debates: Selfishness is a Virtue, Brook vs Epstein; Moderated by Judge Napolitano[29] are two recent presentations of this ethical position.

Politics and economics[edit]

Brook is an outspoken proponent of laissez-faire capitalism. In appearances on CNBC[30] and several articles[31] and speeches, he has defended the rights of corporations and businessmen and upheld the virtues of capitalism. In a January 7, 2007, editorial in USA Today, he defended multimillion-dollar CEO pay packages against the attempt by the government to regulate them.[32] In a 2010 interview, Brook called the efforts of Democrats to raise taxes on multi-millionaires "totally immoral." He criticized George W. Bush for signing the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which regulates corporate accounting practices.[33] He has also argued that antitrust laws are "unjust and make no sense ethically or economically."[34]

On gun rights, Brook has stated, "The government certainly has a role in regulating ownership of weapons", but he states that it is a "complex" issue to do with the philosophy of law. He is inclined to draw the line of prohibition between "offensive" weapons, such as tanks and weapons of mass destruction, and "defensive" weapons.[35]

Brook has taught financial courses dealing with topics such as the Financial Crisis,[36] the corporation,[37] and many more.

Foreign policy[edit]

Brook applies Objectivist moral philosophy to the question of American foreign policy, particularly on the Middle East. He advocates an American foreign policy of rational self-interest that would serve only to protect the rights of Americans, as opposed to any form of government monetary aid, state-building, or spreading democracy.[38] He has criticized the foreign policy of Ron Paul and other libertarians.[39]

He advocates the withdrawal of US troops from Europe, and US withdrawal from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the United Nations, calling the latter "one of the most immoral institutions ever created by man". He is ambivalent about the World Trade Organization.[40]

Brook called for an embargo on North Korea.[41]

Brook has taught foreign policy courses dealing with topics such as the history of the Middle East.[42]

Islamic terrorism[edit]

Brook argues that Islamic terrorists initiated a war against the West because they hate its culture, wealth, love of life, and global influence,[43] and that they attack Israel because of the influence Western culture has had on it.[38] He rejects the idea that Islamic terrorists attack Western nations because they support Israel or because of poverty or retaliation.[38]Brook claims that the West is not at war with terrorism but the ideology of Islamic totalitarianism. He repeatedly says that just like in World War II, the US was at war against not Japanese kamikaze pilots or German tanks but the ideas of Nazism and Japanese imperialism.[44][45]Brook claims that Islamic totalitarians are Muslims who wish to dictate every part of life from the teachings of Islam, taken to its logical extreme.[45] He believes that Islamic totalitarians want to organize their governments according to Islam and that they wish to spread a global Islamic government across the world, sometimes by using legitimate means but mainly by using physical force, terrorism.[45] Brook claims that the Islamic totalitarians repeatedly express that openly by arguing:

Brook has taught courses on Islamic terrorism covering topics like the rise of totalitarian Islam.[46]

Morality of war[edit]

Brook has laid out a unique theory of the morality of war,[47][48] based on the ideas of Ayn Rand [49] and Leonard Peikoff.[50]

Israel[edit]

Brook considers Israel to be a morally good nation because its Western-style government protects the rights of its citizens, Arab and Jewish alike, vastly more than neighboring countries.[51][52] On Zionism, Brook argued that "Zionism fused a valid concern—self-preservation amid a storm of hostility—with a toxic premise: ethnically based collectivism and religion."[53]

Brook advocates supporting Israel, which he sees as a Western ally against Islamic terrorism.[54]Brook disagrees with many of Israel's policies, including its collectivist and religious influences, and its “self-sacrificial” foreign policy of giving its enemies land, money, and other goods.[51][55]

Published works[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Brook, Yaron. "Published Books". The Yaron Brook Show.
  • Brook, Yaron; Watkins, Don (September 21, 2017). In Pursuit of Wealth: The Moral Case for Finance (Paperback ed.). Ayn Rand Institute. p. 264. ISBN 0996010114.
  • Watkins, Don; Brook, Yaron (March 29, 2016). Equal Is Unfair: America's Misguided Fight Against Income Inequality (Hardcover ed.). St. Martin's Press. p. 272. ISBN 125008444X.
  • Brook, Yaron; Watkins, Don (September 18, 2012). Free Market Revolution: How Ayn Rand's Ideas Can End Big Government (Hardcover ed.). St. Martin's Press. p. 272. ISBN 0230341691.
  • Ghate, Debi (April 5, 2011). Why Businessmen Need Philosophy: The Capitalist's Guide to the Ideas Behind Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged (Paperback ed.). Berkley. p. 336. ISBN 9780451232694.
  • Thompson, C. Bradley; Brook, Yaron (May 30, 2010). NEOCONSERVATISM: An Obituary for an Idea (Hardcover ed.). Routledge. p. 256. ISBN 1594518319.
  • Journo, Elan (September 29, 2009). Winning the Unwinnable War: America's Self-Crippled Response to Islamic Totalitarianism (Hardcover ed.). Lexington Books. p. 268. ISBN 0739135406.

Other[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Yaron Brook". Facebook.com. Archived from the original on January 11, 2016. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  2. ^ "BHZ Capital LP". BHZ Capital LP. Retrieved August 19, 2022.
  3. ^ "Atlas came to Irvine". The Orange County Register. Archived from the original on June 15, 2008. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  4. ^ "Yaron Brook". Ayn Rand Institute. Archived from the original on November 12, 2013. Retrieved August 18, 2009.
  5. ^ "BHZ Capital LP". BHZ Capital LP. Retrieved August 19, 2022.
  6. ^ Letran, Vivian (June 7, 2002). "Ayn Rand Institute to Move to Orange County". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on October 16, 2012. Retrieved August 18, 2009.
  7. ^ Anarchy and efficient law. YouTube.com. December 10, 2010. Archived from the original on December 21, 2021. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  8. ^ Yaron Brook en Libertad Querida!. YouTube.com. May 9, 2011. Archived from the original on December 21, 2021. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  9. ^ "美容専門チャンネル". Archived from the original on February 17, 2014.
  10. ^ Yaron Brook, Director of the Ayn Rand Institute at BGU MBA Program. YouTube.com. June 13, 2012. Archived from the original on December 21, 2021. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  11. ^ "Ayn Rand: Radical for Capitalism". UFM New Media. Archived from the original on March 11, 2014. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  12. ^ Yaron Brook – How to be a Rational Egoist. YouTube.com. September 13, 2011. Archived from the original on December 21, 2021. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  13. ^ "Forbes Search". Forbes.com. Archived from the original on February 15, 2012. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  14. ^ Brook, Yaron; Watkins, Don. "In Pursuit of Wealth: The Moral Case For Finance". Ayn Rand Institute. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  15. ^ "Yaron Brook Show: Sacrificing Landlords, Charlie Hebdo & Muhammad Cartoons, More (Relevant portion begins at 1:59)". YouTube. Retrieved August 18, 2022.
  16. ^ "The Yaron Brook Show". Yaron Brook Show. Retrieved August 18, 2022.
  17. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Yaron Brook page at The Federalist Society". The Federalist Society. Retrieved August 24, 2022.
  18. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Search results pages for 'Yaron Brook' at The Federalist Society". The Federalist Society. Retrieved August 24, 2022.
  19. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Income Inequality: Is It Fair or Unfair?". The Federalist Society. Retrieved August 24, 2022.
  20. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Search results page for 'Yaron Brook Show' at The Yaron Brook Show". The Yaron Brook Show. Retrieved August 25, 2022.
  21. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Rules for Life series page". The Yaron Brook Show. Retrieved August 25, 2022.
  22. ^ Watkins, Don. "Don's Writing". Don's Writing. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  23. ^ Brook, Yaron; Hendershott, Robert; Watkins, Don. "Ingenuism". Ingenuism. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  24. ^ "Substack". Substack. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  25. ^ Brook, Yaron; Hendershott, Robert; Watkins, Don. "Progress at the Speed of Thought". Ingenuism. Retrieved August 27, 2022.
  26. ^ Rand, Ayn. "Selfishness". Ayn Rand Lexicon. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  27. ^ Rand, Ayn. "Altruism". Ayn Rand Lexicon. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  28. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Yaron Lectures: The Morality of Selfishness a talk for Cheongshim International Academy". YouTube. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  29. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Yaron Debates: Selfishness is a Virtue, Brook vs Epstein; Moderated by Judge Napolitano". YouTube. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  30. ^ "yaron brook – CNBC". Search.cnbc.com. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  31. ^ Epstein, Alex; Brook, Yaron (October 22, 2002). "Paralyzing America's Producers". Ayn Rand Institute. Archived from the original on May 25, 2011. Retrieved October 2, 2009.
  32. ^ Brook, Yaron (January 7, 2007). "Pay is company's prerogative". USA Today. p. 19A. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  33. ^ Brook, Yaron; Epstein, Alex (July 14, 2003). "The cost of the 'ethical' assault on honest businessmen". Archived from the original on June 5, 2011. Retrieved October 2, 2009.
  34. ^ "Capitalism and Business Ethics: Yaron Brook, Executive Director of the Ayn Rand Institute". Washingtonpost.com. July 19, 2000. Archived from the original on October 24, 2012. Retrieved October 2, 2009.
  35. ^ "YBrook: Did Ayn Rand ever discuss her views on the second amendment and gun control? What are your own views about what restrictions, if any, a proper government would place on ownership of handguns and other firearms? « Podcast « Peikoff". Peikoff.com. March 18, 2013. Archived from the original on April 4, 2015. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  36. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Search results page for "financial crisis" on Yaron Brook's YouTube channel". YouTube. Retrieved August 24, 2022.
  37. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Search results page for "corporation" on Yaron Brook's YouTube channel". YouTube. Retrieved August 24, 2022.
  38. ^ a b c [1] Archived October 5, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  39. ^ "To YB: Is Obama worse on foreign policy than Ron Paul? « Podcast « Peikoff". Peikoff.com. January 27, 2014. Archived from the original on April 5, 2015. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  40. ^ "To YB: Should the United States be a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)? « Podcast « Peikoff". Peikoff.com. March 6, 2014. Archived from the original on April 3, 2015. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  41. ^ "To YBrook: I recently read an article that urged the United States establish relationships with North Korea, similar to Vietnam under Clinton. Was it a good idea then? Is it a good idea now? « Podcast « Peikoff". Peikoff.com. July 25, 2013. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  42. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Search results page for "middle east" on Yaron Brook's YouTube channel". YouTube. Retrieved August 24, 2022.
  43. ^ Dr. Yaron Brook speaks at UCLA panel on Totalitarian Islam. YouTube. April 13, 2007.[dead YouTube link]
  44. ^ [2][dead link]
  45. ^ a b c Dr. Yaron Brook – Israel and the West's War against Islamic Totalitarianism. YouTube. July 13, 2007. Archived from the original on December 21, 2021.
  46. ^ Brook, Yaron. "Search results page for "islam" on Yaron Brook's YouTube channel". YouTube. Retrieved August 24, 2022.
  47. ^ ""Just War Theory" vs. American Self-Defense". The Objective Standard. Archived from the original on December 9, 2012. Retrieved December 21, 2006.
  48. ^ [3] Archived October 29, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  49. ^ "Media Center". Aynrand.org. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  50. ^ Leonard Peikoff Interview about attacking IRAN. YouTube.com. June 18, 2008. Archived from the original on December 21, 2021. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  51. ^ a b [4] Archived October 5, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  52. ^ "Israel Has A Moral Right To Its Life". Capmag.com. June 23, 2002. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015. Retrieved March 31, 2015.
  53. ^ Arfa, Orit (July 12, 2007). "'You don't fight a tactic'". The Jerusalem Post. Archived from the original on February 13, 2016. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  54. ^ Sabo, Bevan (October 6, 2009). "An Interview with Yaron Brook (Part I)". Free Market Mojo. Archived from the original on November 22, 2010. Retrieved January 11, 2016.
  55. ^ Brook, Yaron (June 23, 2002). "Israel Has A Moral Right To Its Life". Archived from the original on January 4, 2010. Retrieved October 2, 2009.

External links[edit]