Zhang Enli

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Zhang Enli
Born Jilin, China
Nationality Chinese
Education Wuxi Technical University, Arts and Design Institute
Known for Oil Paintings
Chinese name
Chinese 張恩利

Zhang Enli (simplified Chinese: 张恩利; traditional Chinese: 張恩利) was born 1965 in Jilin Province, China, is a professional artist living and working in Shanghai. He graduated from the Arts & Design Institute of Wuxi Technical University, China in 1989, and teaches at the Arts and Design Institute of Donghua University.

His paintings depict the familiar and overlooked, everyday objects connected through the artist’s immediate surroundings, often from unusual viewpoints or focusing on seemingly insignificant details.[1] He produces works that invite universal interpretation. He often works in series, such as his paintings that focus on the idea of the container—cardboard boxes, ashtrays, tin chests and lavatories.[2] Other works depict functional municipal structures that populate the streets of Shanghai, such as public toilets and tiled outdoor water features.

Exhibitions[edit]

His work was included in group exhibitions such as "Infinite Painting and Global Realism", curated by Francesco Bonami and Sarah Cosulich Canarutto, at Villa Manin Centro d'Arte Contemporanea, Udine (2006), "Dreaming of the Dragon’s Nation: Contemporary Art from China’, at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2005) and "Human, Too Human" at BizArt, Shanghai ( 2004 ). Zhang Enli gained attention at Art Basel, 2006, when he was one of the most successful of the contemporary Chinese artists whose work was on sale.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bonami, Francesco; Sarah Consulich Canarutto (2006). "Infinite Painting - Contemporary Painting and Global Realism". Retrieved 2008-03-10. 
  2. ^ Pollock, Lindsay; Philip Boroff (March 10, 2006). "Kravis and Schwab Join Art-Starved Collectors at Armory Show". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2008-03-10. 
  3. ^ "Art sales: cash flows for young blood". The Telegraph. June 20, 2006. Retrieved 2008-03-10.