Zygomaticus minor muscle

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Zygomaticus minor
Musculuszygomaticusminor.png
Muscles of the head, face, and neck.
Details
Originzygomatic bone
Insertionskin of the upper lip
Arteryfacial artery
Nervebuccal branch
Actionselevates upper lip
Identifiers
LatinMusculus zygomaticus minor
TA98A04.1.03.030
TA22080
FMA46811
Anatomical terms of muscle

The zygomaticus minor muscle is a muscle of facial expression. It originates from the zygomatic bone, lateral to the rest of the levator labii superioris muscle, and inserts into the outer part of the upper lip. It draws the upper lip backward, upward, and outward and is used in smiling. It is innervated by the facial nerve (VII).

Structure[edit]

The zygomaticus minor muscle originates from the zygomatic bone.[1] It inserts into the tissue around the upper lip, particularly blending its fibres with orbicularis oris muscle.[1][2] It lies lateral to the rest of levator labii superioris muscle, and medial to its stronger synergist zygomaticus major muscle. It travels at an angle of approximately 30°.[3] It has a mean width of around 0.5 cm.[3]

Nerve supply[edit]

The zygomaticus minor muscle is supplied by the buccal branch of the facial nerve (VII).

Variation[edit]

The zygomaticus minor muscle may have either a straight or a curved course along its length.[4] It may attach to both the upper lip and the lateral alar region.[4] It may be underdeveloped in some people, with its role taken over by nearby synergists.[3][4] These synergists rarely change shape or position, but any difference in smile is usually imperceptible.[3]

Function[edit]

The zygomaticus minor muscle draws the upper lip up, back, and out, such as during smiling.

History[edit]

The zygomaticus minor muscle is sometimes referred to as the "zygomatic head" of the levator labii superioris muscle.[5]

Images[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hur, Mi-Sun; Youn, Kwan Hyun; Kim, Hee-Jin (2018). "New Insight Regarding the Zygomaticus Minor as Related to Cosmetic Facial Injections". Clinical Anatomy. 31 (7): 974–980. doi:10.1002/ca.23272. ISSN 1098-2353.
  2. ^ Youn, Kwan-Hyun; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Dong Soo; Koh, Ki-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jin; Paik, Doo-Jin (March 2012). "Morphology of the Zygomaticus Minor and Its Relationship With the Orbicularis Oculi Muscle". Journal of Craniofacial Surgery. 23 (2): 546–548. doi:10.1097/SCS.0b013e31824190c3. ISSN 1049-2275.
  3. ^ a b c d Zabojova, Jorga; Thrikutam, Nikhitha; Tolley, Philip; Perez, Justin; Rozen, Shai M.; Rodriguez-Lorenzo, Andres (August 2018). "Relational Anatomy of the Mimetic Muscles and Its Implications on Free Functional Muscle Inset in Facial Reanimation". Annals of Plastic Surgery. 81 (2): 203–207. doi:10.1097/SAP.0000000000001507. ISSN 0148-7043.
  4. ^ a b c Choi, Da-Yae; Hur, Mi-Sun; Youn, Kwan-Hyun; Kim, Jisoo; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sophie Soyeon (August 2014). "Clinical Anatomic Considerations of the Zygomaticus Minor Muscle Based on the Morphology and Insertion Pattern". Dermatologic Surgery. 40 (8): 858–863. doi:10.1111/dsu.0000000000000063. ISSN 1076-0512. PMID 25006853.
  5. ^ Eliot Goldfinger Artist/Anatomist (7 November 1991). Human Anatomy for Artists : The Elements of Form: The Elements of Form. Oxford University Press. p. 90. ISBN 978-0-19-976310-8.

External links[edit]