Afro-Asian Cup of Nations

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Afro-Asian Cup of Nations
Founded 1978
Region International (FIFA)
Number of teams 2
Current champions  Japan (2nd Title)
Most successful team(s)  Japan (2 Titles)

The Afro-Asian Cup of Nations is played between the winners of the Asian Cup or the Asian Games and the winners of the Africa Cup of Nations. The first edition in 1978, where Iran defeated Ghana 3-0, the trophy was not awarded: because the second leg was cancelled due to political problems in Iran. The 1989, 2005 editions were cancelled. The 1997 edition was severely delayed to 1999, while the "true" 1999 edition (between Egypt and Iran) was also canceled.

The competition was discontinued following a CAF decision on July 30, 2000, after AFC representatives had supported Germany rather than South Africa in the vote for hosting the 2006 World Cup. The competition was scheduled to be resumed in 2005 with the match Tunisia-Japan, but then was cancelled. However the trophy was resumed in 2007 under the name "AFC Asia/Africa Challenge Cup".

The most successful team is Japan with 2 championships.

Results & Statistics[edit]

Finals[edit]

Year Host nation Final
Champions Score Runners-up
1985
Details
Cameroon Cameroon
Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia

Cameroon
4 – 1
1 – 2

Saudi Arabia
1988
Details
Qatar Qatar
South Korea
1 – 1
(pen : 4 – 3)

Egypt
1991
Details
Iran Iran
Algeria Algeria

Algeria
1 – 2
1 – 0

Iran
1993
Details
Japan Japan
Japan
1 – 0
(aet)

Ivory Coast
1995
Details
Uzbekistan Uzbekistan
Nigeria Nigeria

Uzbekistan
2 – 3
0 – 1

Nigeria
1999
Details
South Africa South Africa
Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia

South Africa
1 – 0
0 – 0

Saudi Arabia
2007
Details
Japan Japan
Japan
4 – 1
Egypt

Most successful national teams[edit]

Team Champions Runners-Up
 Japan 2 (1993, 2007) -
 Algeria 1 (1991) -
 Cameroon 1 (1985) -
 Nigeria 1 (1995) -
 South Africa 1 (1999) -
 South Korea 1 (1987) -
 Egypt - 2 (1987, 2007)
 Saudi Arabia - 2 (1985, 1999)
 Iran - 1 (1991)
 Ivory Coast - 1 (1993)
 Uzbekistan - 1 (1995)

Most successful teams by continent[edit]

Continent Champions Runners-up
Africa 4 (1985, 1991, 1995, 1997) 3 (1987, 1993, 2007)
Asia 3 (1987, 1993, 2007) 4 (1985, 1991, 1995, 1997)

Editions[edit]

1985 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations[edit]

The 1985 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations was contested by Cameroon, winners of the 1984 African Cup of Nations, and Saudi Arabia, winners of the 1984 AFC Asian Cup. Cameroon won 5-3 on aggregate over the two legs.

15 September 1985
Cameroon  4–1  Saudi Arabia
Omam-Biyik Goal 8'
Milla Goal 33' Goal 84'
Kundé Goal 87' (pen.)
Report Abu Dawood Goal 44'
Stade Ahmadou Ahidjo, Yaoundé, Cameroon
Attendance: 60,000
Referee: Gebreysus Tesfaye (Ethiopia)
4 October 1985
Saudi Arabia  2–1  Cameroon
Mohammed Goal 9'
Abdul-Jawad Goal 86'
Report Omam-Biyik Goal 57'
King Fahd Stadium, Taif, Saudi Arabia
Attendance: 20,000
Referee: Jassim Mandi (Bahrain)

1988 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations[edit]

The 1988 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations was contested between South Korea, winners of the 1986 Asian Games, and Egypt, winners of the 1986 Africa Cup of Nations. The match was played in one leg in Doha, Qatar.

6 January 1988
South Korea  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Egypt
Lee Tae-Ho Goal 65' report Younes Goal 88'
  Penalties  
4–3
Doha, Qatar
Attendance: 15,000
Referee: Jassim Mandi (Bahrain)

1991 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations[edit]

The 1991 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations was contested by Algeria, winners of the 1990 African Cup of Nations, and Iran, winners of the 1990 Asian Games football tournament. Algeria won by the away goal after egality 2 - 2 in aggregates.[1]

27 September 1991
Iran  2–1  Algeria
Marfavi Goal 13'78' Lazizi Goal 23'
Azadi Stadium, Tehran, Iran
Attendance: 100,000
Referee: Nizar Watti (Syria)
13 October 1991
Algeria  1–0  Iran
Benhalima Goal 78'
Stade 5 Juillet 1962, Algiers, Algeria
Attendance: 80,000
Referee: Naji Jouini (Tunisia)

1993 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations[edit]

The 1993 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations was contested between Japan, winners of the 1992 Asian Cup, and Ivory Coast, winners of the 1992 Africa Cup of Nations. The match was played in one leg in Tokyo, Japan.

4 October 1993
Japan  1–0 (a.e.t.)  Ivory Coast
Miura Goal 116' report
Yoyogi National Gymnasium, Tokyo, Japan
Attendance: 53,302
Referee: Wei Jihong (China)

1995 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations[edit]

The 1995 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations was contested between Uzbekistan, winners of the 1994 Asian Games, and Nigeria, winners of the 1994 Africa Cup of Nations. Nigeria won 4–2 on aggregate.

21 October 1995
Uzbekistan  2–3  Nigeria
Kasimov Goal 70'
Fyodorov Goal 85'
report Oliseh Goal 10'
Ikpeba Goal 65'
N. Kanu Goal 71'
10 November 1995
Nigeria  1–0  Uzbekistan
Amunike Goal 82' report
National Stadium, Lagos, Nigeria
Attendance: 60,000
Referee: Sidi Bekaye Magassa (Mali)

1999 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations[edit]

The 1999 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations nwas contested betwee Saudi Arabia, winners of the 1996 Asian Cup, and South Africa, winners of the 1996 Africa Cup of Nations. The matches were originally planned to be played in 1997, but South Africa couldn't be bothered to find time on the calendar. After being delayed for two years, the matches were finally played in 1999. South Africa won the title on aggregate score 1–0.

18 September 1999
South Africa  1–0  Saudi Arabia
Ndlanya Goal 48' report
Green Point Stadium, Cape Town, South Africa
Attendance: 20,000
Referee: Felix Tangawarima (Zimbabwe)
30 September 1999
Saudi Arabia  0–0  South Africa
report

2007 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations[edit]

The 2007 Afro-Asian Cup of Nations was played between Japan and the winners of the 2006 Africa Cup of Nations Egypt. The competition return after 8 years, the previous edition was held in 1999. This edition was maybe called AFC Asia/Africa Challenge Cup and held in one leg in Japan.

17 October 2007
19:30
Japan  4–1  Egypt
Ōkubo Goal 21'42'
Maeda Goal 53'
Kaji Goal 68'
report Fadl Goal 58'
Nagai Stadium, Osaka, Japan
Attendance: 41,901
Referee: Grzegorz Gilewski (Poland)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Algérie - Iran 1991". dzfootball. Retrieved 2007. 

External links[edit]