Backwoods Bunny

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Backwoods Bunny
Merrie Melodies series
Backwoodsbunny.jpg
Title card
Directed by Robert McKimson
Produced by Warner Bros. Pictures
Voices by Mel Blanc (Bugs Bunny)
Daws Butler (Pappy Buzzard/Elvis Buzzard, uncredited)
Music by Milt Franklyn
Animation by Warren Batchelder
Ted Bonnicksen
George Grandpré
Tom Ray
Layouts by Robert Gribbroek
Backgrounds by William Butler
Studio Warner Bros. Cartoons
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release date(s) June 13, 1959 (USA)
Color process Color
Running time 7 min
Language English

Backwoods Bunny is a Merrie Melodies cartoon short, released in 1959, that was written and directed by Robert McKimson. While Bugs Bunny takes a vacation in the Ozarks he is pursued by some famished buzzards named Pappy and Elvis. This is one of two cartoons featuring Pappy and Elvis, the other being the Foghorn Leghorn cartoon, The Dixie Fryer.

Plot[edit]

Bugs Bunny arrives in the Ozarks, just his sort of place for vacation. But in a small cottage placed atop a tall bare tree lives a bumpkin buzzard and his son Elvis. Elvis spots Bugs and decides to lure him with a carrot. Bugs of course notices his attempt from a tree stump. Bugs puts his hand out to feel the carrot long enough to lure Elvis to the hole entrance, and Elvis pulls out of the hand which turns out to be a long hose with a white glove on the end of it. Bugs turn on the water tap sends Elvis back and forth between two trees, until Bugs turns off the water and Elvis falls to the ground. Bugs asks Elvis what is going to with the snake. Elvis panics and flies off toward the cottage and comes back with a rifle. When Bugs tells him there are no snakes, Elvis points his rifle at Bugs and shoots, but misses. Bugs inches closer and Elvis backs off until he falls off a cliff.

As Elvis starts to have another go at Bugs, he falls for Bugs dressed as a pretty hillbilly lady. Very soon, however, he realises its Bugs and shoots at him, Bugs diving into his rabbit hole. Elvis points his rifle in the hole and demands Bugs come out. Bugs refuses. As Elvis gives Bugs the count of four, Bugs attaches some pipes from the end of the rifle to where the father buzzard is lounging in his cottage. After the countdown is up, Elvis shoots his father in the face. A misunderstanding makes Elvis shoot his father repeatedly, the continuity made by Bugs, dressed for golf, singing the Art Mooney tune "I'm Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover".

Voice Actors[edit]

Music[edit]

  • "I'm Looking Over a Four-Leaf Clover", (uncredited). Music by Harry M. Woods, Lyrics by Mort Dixon
  • "Arkansas Traveler", (uncredited). Music by Sanford Faulkner
  • "Oh, You Beautiful Doll", (uncredited). Music by Nat Ayer

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Apes of Wrath
Bugs Bunny Cartoons
1959
Succeeded by
Wild and Woolly Hare