Bajío

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The Bajío (lowlands) is a region of North-Central Mexico that includes parts of the states of Guanajuato, Querétaro, Aguascalientes and Jalisco.[1][2][3]

The Bajío has repeatedly been recognized as the region with the best quality of life and safest region in Mexico[4] also the most dynamic in Latin America.[5][6] Nowadays, is a vigorous service region that is experiencing an ongoing social and economic revitalization. It is a strong business and economic centre.[7][8]

The largest cities of Bajio are León, Santiago de Queretaro and Aguascalientes.[9]

Pre-historic Bajío culture[edit]

Recent archaeological studies of the Bajío have discovered an extensive, pre-historic cultural tradition unique to the region, particularly along the flood plains of the Lerma and Laja rivers. The Bajío Culture flourished from 300 to 650CE, with cultural centers ranging from El Cóporo in the far north of Guanajuato to Plazuelas in the far south west. More than 1,400 sites have been discovered throughout the state of Guanajuato, with only the sites of Cañada de la Virgen, El Cóporo, Peralta, and Plazuelas having received extensive study.

Geography[edit]

In general parlance, it is usually associated with the States of Guanajuato and Querétaro, although it only forms a part of them. It is characterized by its highly mechanized agriculture, with mean precipitation in the order of 700 millimetres (28 in) per annum (one of the highest in the country). During the Viceroyalty of New Spain, the area was known as the breadbasket of the territory. Up until today (21st century's second decade), the region produces sorghum, wheat and maize as its main crops.

States[edit]

Bajío in Jalisco

The free and sovereign states of the Bajío are:

Aguascalientes
Guanajuato
Jalisco
Querétaro
Coat of arms of Aguascalientes.svg Coat of arms of Guanajuato.svg Coat of arms of Jalisco.svg Coat of arms of Queretaro.svg
Aguascalientes Guanajuato Guadalajara Querétaro

State of Aguascalientes[edit]

State of Guanajuato[edit]

State of Jalisco[edit]

State of Querétaro[edit]

Querétaro

Demography[edit]

Aguascalientes

Largest cities[edit]

Rank City Population
1 León 1 609 717
2 Santiago de Querétaro 1 097 028
3 Aguascalientes 932 298
4 Irapuato 529 979
5 Celaya 468 387
6 Salamanca 260 769
7 Guanajuato 260 769
8 San Juan del Río 190 878
9 Lagos de Moreno 150 157
10 Tepatitlán 149 000

Economy[edit]

Today, the region is one of the fastest-growing in the country. This has caused the metropolitan areas to attract many migrants from other parts of Mexico.[10][11][12]

The region has had an outstanding industrial and economic development in the last 15 years. The cities of Bajío has one of the highest income per capita in Mexico.[13]

High-speed rail in the Bajío[edit]

There are plans to build a high-speed rail Querétaro-Mexico City system, which would continue to Guadalajara. It would work as the main form of transportation in all the Bajío and its capital cities.[14]

Culture[edit]

Querétaro

The Bajío is known for being the cradle of Mexican Independence from Spanish Empire and one of the most conservative bastions of Mexican Catholicism.

The Bajío is where in April 1915, during the Mexican Revolution, General Álvaro Obregón provoked decisive battles against Pancho Villa. Villa's troops lost in June outside Celaya.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Coordinates: 20°28′24″N 101°12′02″W / 20.473335°N 101.200562°W / 20.473335; -101.200562