Brood X

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Brood X cicada

Brood X (Brood 10), the Great Eastern Brood, is one of 15 broods of periodical cicadas that appear regularly throughout the eastern United States. It has the greatest range and concentration of any of the 17-year cicadas.

Every 17 years, Brood X cicadas tunnel en masse to the surface of the ground, lay eggs, and then die off in several weeks. The combination of long dormancy, simultaneous emergence of vast numbers, and short period before the nymphs' burrowing underground to safety, allows the brood to survive even massive predation.[1]

A 17 year Cicada from brood X 2004 - Princeton, NJ .
2004 Brood X swarm in Ohio
Detail of swarm
Emergence holes located under flagstone

Brood X's most recent appearance was in the spring and early summer of 2004 throughout an area roughly enclosed by Illinois, Michigan, New York and Georgia. The next appearances will be in 2021 and 2038.[1][2]

Bob Dylan's song "Day of the Locusts" (on his 1970 album New Morning) refers to the Brood X cicadas that were present in Princeton, New Jersey in June 1970 when Dylan received an honorary degree from Princeton University.[3][4][5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Post, Susan L.; Michael R. Jeffords (photos) (Summer 2004). "A Trill of a Lifetime: More Information About the Periodical Cicada". Illinois Natural History Survey. Prairie Research Institute. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 
  2. ^ Moore, Thomas E.; Thomas J. Walker (April 27, 2001). "Genus Magicidada periodical cicadas". Singing Insects of North America. University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Archived from the original on 2008-09-30. Retrieved 2011-07-01. 
  3. ^ James Barron (1996-06-04). "Cicadas: They're Back!". New York Times. Retrieved 2013-04-08. 
  4. ^ "Are Periodical Cicadas Coming to Your Town - Magicicada Broods and Brood Maps". Cicadamania.com. Retrieved 2013-04-08. 
  5. ^ "Bob Dylan Receives Honorary Princeton Degree | Music News". Rolling Stone. 1970-07-09. Retrieved 2013-04-08. 
  6. ^ Cameron W. Barr, "In D.C. Area, It's the Day Of the Cicada," Washington Post, page A1, Sunday, March 28, 2004

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]