Community health

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Community health, a field of public health, is a discipline which concerns itself with the study and improvement of the health characteristics of biological communities. While the term community can be broadly defined, community health tends to focus on geographical areas rather than people with shared characteristics. The health characteristics of a community are often examined using geographic information system (GIS) software and public health datasets. Some projects, such as InfoShare or GEOPROJ combine GIS with existing datasets, allowing the general public to examine the characteristics of any given community in participating countries.

Because 'health III' (broadly defined as well-being) is influenced by a wide array of socio-demographic characteristics, relevant variables range from the proportion of residents of a given age group to the overall life expectancy of the neighborhood/community. Medical interventions aimed at improving the health of a community range from improving access to medical care to public health communications campaigns. Recent research efforts have focused on how the built environment and socio-economic status affect health.

Community health may be studied within three broad categories:

The success of community health programmes relies upon the transfer of information from health professionals to the general public using one-to-one or one to many communication (mass communication). The latest shift is towards health marketing.

Many symposiums regarding health care, policies and best practices also aid in improving health systems. One example is Health Datapalooza, which was sponsored by Accretive Health in 2014. According to Richard A. Kimball Jr., "The Health Data Consortium advocates data best practices and information sharing with data providers, and works with businesses, entrepreneurs, and academia to help them understand how to use data to develop new products, services, apps and research insights."[1]

Academic resources[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Maureen Daugherty (30 May 2014), Accretive Health to Sponsor Health Data Consortium’s Health Datapalooza, retrieved 16 January 2015 
  • John Sanbourne Bockoven. Moral Treatment in American Psychiatry, New York: Springer Publishing Co., 1963

External links[edit]