Corporate social media

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Corporate social media is the use of social media by and within corporations.[1]

Today, an increasing number of corporations, across most industries, have adopted the use of social media in the workplace. As a result, corporate use of social networking and micro blogging sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and LinkedIn, has substantially increased. According to an April 2014 article by the Harvard Business Review, "Fifty-eight percent of companies are currently engaged in social networks like Facebook, microblogs like Twitter, and sharing multimedia on platforms such as YouTube." The Harvard Business Review cites an additional 21% of companies as being in the process of implementing a formal social media initiative.[2]

The 2014 HBR report indicates 79% of companies have or will have social media initiatives in place. This percentage is an increase over a similar 2010 report that indicated that two-thirds of companies had or would have social media initiatives in place.[3]

The widespread and growing use of social media by corporations is resulting in the development and implementation of formal written policies. Corporate social media use has grown so rapidly that certain regulated industries are now required to maintain formal written social media policies. For example, the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, a consortium of bank and credit union regulators, implemented in December 2013,formal social media guidance for its banks and credit unions. In the eyes of regulators, risks associated with social media use are of a level that requires formal attention. At a minimum, regulators require that organizations "listen" to what is being said about them on social media platforms in an effort to identify legal, compliance, and reputational concerns.[4]

Despite the identified risks associated with social media, corporations are recognizing the benefits associated with adopting a corporate social media strategy. Such benefits include lower cost and more effective marketing and advertising initiatives, internal and external corporate communications, and overall brand awareness. As a result, corporations are investing at an increasing rate in social business software and services such as Jive Engage, Yammer or eXo Platform. The belief is that the benefits outweigh the potential risks of bad press, customer complaints, and brand bashing.

Conversely, businesses can find themselves in a bad situation when they use social media poorly. An example of poor social media execution came in November 2013 when JP Morgan decided to have a question and answer session via Twitter. During that time, 2 out of 3 tweets received were negative due to prior scrutiny they had faced. In this case, using social media and interacting with the public did not help to promote them in a positive way. Another example came on September 11, 2013, when AT&T posted a picture on Twitter of a cell phone capturing a picture of the Twin Towers memorial lights with the caption "Never forget." The tweet was met with great backlash from consumers for using a tragedy as a marketing opportunity, with many customers threatening to leave AT&T. After seeing the backlash it was receiving, AT&T removed the post and apologized within about an hour of its posting.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Joel Postman (2009), SocialCorp: Social Media Goes Corporate, ISBN 978-0-321-58008-5 
  2. ^ Ennes, Meghan (April 2014). "Social Media: What Most Companies Don't Know Risks". HBR.org. Retrieved 25 April 2014. 
  3. ^ "The New Conversation: Taking Social Media from Talk to Action". Harvard Business Review: 1, 3. 2010. Retrieved 4 April 2013. 
  4. ^ FFIEC (December 11, 2013). "Financial Regulators Issue Final Guidance on Social Media". HBR.org. Retrieved 25 April 2014. 
  5. ^ Stern, Joanna. "AT&T Slammed on Twitter and Facebook For Sept. 11 Marketing Move". ABC News. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 

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