D. B. Weiss

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D. B. Weiss
D. B. Weiss by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Born Daniel B Weiss
(1971-04-23) April 23, 1971 (age 43)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Occupation Author, screenwriter, producer, director

Daniel B "D. B." Weiss (born April 23, 1971)[1] is an American author, screenwriter, producer, and director. His debut novel, Lucky Wander Boy, was themed around video games. He has since been linked with screen adaptations of various science fiction and fantasy stories, in particular his collaboration with David Benioff as screenwriters and executive producers of Game of Thrones, the HBO adaptation of George R. R. Martin's series of books. He has also expressed an interest in writing for video games.

Early life[edit]

Weiss was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. He is a graduate of Wesleyan University and earned a Master of Philosophy in Irish literature from Trinity College, Dublin and a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.[2]

Career[edit]

Novels[edit]

In 2006, Weiss said he has a second novel finished that "needs a second draft".[3]

Screenwriting[edit]

In 2003, Weiss and David Benioff, who had been friends since college,[4] were hired to collaborate on a new script of Orson Scott Card's book Ender's Game in consultation with the then-designated director Wolfgang Petersen.[5] It was not used.[6]

Weiss was hired to rewrite the screenplay for a film adaptation of the popular video game series Halo, based on a script written by Alex Garland. The rewrite was completed in 2006.[7][8] However, director Neill Blomkamp declared the project dead in late 2007.[9]

Weiss also worked on a script for a prequel to I Am Legend.[10] However, in May 2011, director Francis Lawrence stated that he did not think the prequel was ever going to happen.[11]

Weiss currently works with David Benioff, the writer of Troy, on the television series Game of Thrones, based on George R. R. Martin's book series A Song of Ice and Fire.[12]

Bibliography[edit]

Filmography[edit]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Category Work Result
2011 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Drama Series[14]
(shared with eight other producers and executive producers)
Game of Thrones Nominated
2011 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series[14]
(shared with David Benioff)
Game of Thrones Nominated
2012 Hugo Award Best Dramatic Presentation — Long Form[14]
(shared with eight other producers and executive producers)
Game of Thrones Won
2012 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Drama Series[14]
(shared with nine other producers and executive producers)
Game of Thrones Nominated
2012 PGA Award Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Drama[14]
(shared with Carolyn Strauss, Frank Doelger, David Benioff, and Mark Huffam)
Game of Thrones Nominated
2012 WGA Award Best New Series[14]
(shared with Bryan Cogman, Jane Espenson, George R. R. Martin, and David Benioff)
Game of Thrones Nominated
2012 SFX Award Best New Show[14][15]
(shared with cast and crew)
Game of Thrones Won
2012 SFX Award Best TV Show[14]
(shared with cast and crew)
Game of Thrones Nominated
2012 Monte-Carlo TV Festival Award Drama TV series: Outstanding International Producer[14][16][17]
(shared with David Benioff, Frank Doelger, and Carolyn Strauss)
Game of Thrones Won
2013 PGA Award Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television, Drama[14]
(shared with Frank Doelger, Carolyn Strauss, Bernadette Caulfield, and David Benioff)
Game of Thrones Nominated
2013 WGA Award Best Drama Series[14]
(shared with David Benioff, George R. R. Martin, Bryan Cogman, and Vanessa Taylor)
Game of Thrones Nominated

References[edit]

  1. ^ "D.B. Weiss Biography". StarPulse. Retrieved 11 October 2013. 
  2. ^ "Lucky Wander Boy". Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  3. ^ "GameSetInterview: Halo Screenwriter DB Weiss". GameSetWatch. July 13, 2006. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Game of Thrones: Interview with David Benioff and D.B. Weiss". HBO. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  5. ^ "DB Weiss talks Halo". Writerswrite.com. July 19, 2006. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Card talks Ender's Game movie". IGN Entertainment, Inc. April 18, 2007. Retrieved January 1, 2009. 
  7. ^ Miller, Ross (July 14, 2006). "DB Weiss takes on Halo script". Joystiq. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  8. ^ Fritz, Ben (2006-10-31). "No home for Halo pic". Variety. Retrieved October 20, 2007. 
  9. ^ Farrell, Nick (October 9, 2007). "Halo movie canned". The Inquirer. Retrieved May 30, 2008. 
  10. ^ "I Am Legend prequel in the works". UPI.com. September 26, 2008. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Exclusive: 'I Am Legend Prequel' is Dead, Says Francis Lawrence". MTV Movies blog. May 3, 2011. Retrieved August 11, 2011. 
  12. ^ Fleming, Michael (January 16, 2007). "HBO turns Fire into fantasy series". Variety. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  13. ^ Ariana Bacle (2014-09-05). "Oprah-approved 'Specials' stars intellectually disabled 20-somethings". Retrieved 2014-09-09. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "D.B. Weiss: Awards". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  15. ^ "SFX awards 2012: The Winners". SFX. February 4, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Golden Nymphs Awards Listing, 2012". Monte-Carlo Television Festival. June 14, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  17. ^ "HBO's Game of Thrones, Game Change Win Top Prizes at Monte Carlo TV Festival". The Hollywood Reporter. June 14, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 

External links[edit]