Farmington, Utah

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Farmington, Utah
City
The new City Hall, built in 2010
The new City Hall, built in 2010
Location in Davis County and the state of Utah.
Location in Davis County and the state of Utah.
Coordinates: 40°59′12″N 111°53′57″W / 40.98667°N 111.89917°W / 40.98667; -111.89917Coordinates: 40°59′12″N 111°53′57″W / 40.98667°N 111.89917°W / 40.98667; -111.89917
Country United States
State Utah
County Davis
Settled 1847
Incorporated February 18, 1852
Founded by Hector Caleb Haight
Named for Farming
Area
 • Total 7.8 sq mi (20.1 km2)
 • Land 7.8 sq mi (20.1 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 4,304 ft (1,312 m)
Population (2012)
 • Total 20,750
 • Density 1,557.8/sq mi (601.5/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 84025
Area code(s) 385, 801
FIPS code 49-24740[1]
GNIS feature ID 1441004[2]
Website http://www.farmington.utah.gov/

Farmington is a city in Davis County, Utah, United States. It is part of the OgdenClearfield, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 18,275 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Davis County.[3] Lagoon Amusement Park is located in Farmington.

The city has made it onto the Money magazine's "Best Places to Live" index, and was ranked number 12 on the 2011 list.[4]

History[edit]

Originally known as North Cottonwood, Farmington was permanently settled by Mormon pioneers in 1847. The Children's Primary Association of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized here on 11 August 1878. It was the birthplace of one of the longest lived Latter-day Saint apostles, LeGrand Richards. His maternal great-grandfather, Joseph Lee Robinson, was the first bishop of what was then the North Cottonwood Ward. Lagoon Amusement Park was founded here in 1886 and occupies 100 acres (0.40 km2) of the city. Ezra T. Clark was an early settler of Farmington who later founded the Davis County Bank and built several houses in the area, some of which are located in the Clark Lane Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Geography and climate[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.8 square miles (20.1 km²), all of it land.

Farmington is located between the nearby Wasatch Mountains and the Great Salt Lake. Lake enhanced snowfall occurs frequently during the winter, and cool downslope mountain breezes occur on most summer evenings. Under the Köppen climate classification, Farmington experiences what may be classified as a hot-summer Mediterranean climate (Csa), despite not being on the west coast of an ocean like most Mediterranean climates. It may also be classified as humid continental (Dsa), if the boundary between continental and subtropical climate is an average January temperature of 0 °C (32 °F) rather than −3 °C (27 °F).

Climate data for Farmington, Utah (1981–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 38.1
(3.4)
43.7
(6.5)
54.3
(12.4)
62.8
(17.1)
73.2
(22.9)
83.6
(28.7)
92.5
(33.6)
90.5
(32.5)
80.0
(26.7)
66.1
(18.9)
50.3
(10.2)
39.3
(4.1)
64.5
(18.1)
Average low °F (°C) 21.4
(−5.9)
24.8
(−4)
32.3
(0.2)
39.0
(3.9)
46.7
(8.2)
54.7
(12.6)
61.9
(16.6)
60.5
(15.8)
51.0
(10.6)
40.0
(4.4)
30.4
(−0.9)
22.7
(−5.2)
40.5
(4.7)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.99
(50.5)
2.01
(51.1)
2.50
(63.5)
2.44
(62)
2.65
(67.3)
1.45
(36.8)
0.80
(20.3)
0.69
(17.5)
1.52
(38.6)
2.12
(53.8)
2.09
(53.1)
1.97
(50)
22.25
(565.2)
Snowfall inches (cm) 13.8
(35.1)
11.0
(27.9)
3.8
(9.7)
1.3
(3.3)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.3
(0.8)
5.7
(14.5)
12.7
(32.3)
48.6
(123.4)
Source: NOAA[5]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 591
1870 976 65.1%
1880 1,073 9.9%
1890 1,036 −3.4%
1900 1,050 1.4%
1910 1,280 21.9%
1920 1,170 −8.6%
1930 1,339 14.4%
1940 1,211 −9.6%
1950 1,468 21.2%
1960 1,951 32.9%
1970 2,526 29.5%
1980 4,691 85.7%
1990 9,028 92.5%
2000 12,081 33.8%
2010 18,275 51.3%
Est. 2012 20,750 13.5%

In the 2010 census[1] there were 18,275 people, 5,148 households, and 2,769 families residing in the city with an average family size of 3.41. The population density was 1,557.8 people per square mile (601.1/km²). There were 5,339 housing units at an average density of 414.7 per square mile (160.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.1% White, 0.7% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 1.0% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.98% of the population.

There were 5,148 households out of which 49% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 80.8% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.3% were non-families. 8.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.72 and the average family size was 3.97.

In the city the population was spread out with 37.0% under the age of 18, 11.4% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 19.0% from 45 to 64, and 5.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 26 years. For every 100 females there were 109.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 109.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $74,250, and the median income for a family was $78,492. Males had a median income of $56,847 versus $30,464 for females. The per capita income for the city was $24,407. About 1.6% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 0.2% of those age 65 or over.

Legacy Highway[edit]

Main article: Legacy Parkway

There was controversy regarding the construction of the northern Legacy Highway. This highway would add on to the portion of the Legacy Highway that is complete, and runs from Farmington to Salt Lake City. The Northern Legacy Highway would run from Brigham City to Farmington, and connect to the existing highway in residential West Farmington. Some residents were opposed to this as it would result in the demolition of historic homes and divide the city into two parts. The highway would also demolish the Davis County Fairgrounds and Legacy Arena, site of the Davis County Fair and other events.[citation needed] Another contingent of citizens was in favor of the Legacy Highway, as it would provide convenience for many commuters from Farmington, a mainly bedroom community to the Salt Lake Valley.

During elections in 2007 a majority of voters in Farmington voted in opposition to the construction of Legacy Highway as it was planned. Subsequently, legislation was passed in the state legislature allowing construction of Legacy Highway through Farmington to go ahead as planned.

S&S Shortline Railroad Park & Museum[edit]

The S&S Shortline Railroad Park & Museum, located in the Farmington area, contains over 90 pieces of railroad equipment in all shapes and sizes. It also has two separate railroads where guests can enjoy train rides on the first Saturday of every month from June to September. The track gauges of the two railroads are 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge[6] and 7 12 in (190.5 mm) gauge. One interesting item in the museum's collection is a 2 ft (610 mm) gauge, oil-powered, 4-4-0 steam locomotive built by Crown Metal Products.

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ Best Places to Live, Money Magazine, 2009, retrieved 2009-10-16 
  5. ^ "NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved May 5, 2013. 
  6. ^ Carson City & Mills Park RR No. 3
  7. ^ "Washington Governor Henry McBride". National Governors Association. Retrieved October 10, 2012. 

External links[edit]