Four Peaks

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Browns Peak
Yavapai: Wikopa
FourpeaksDSC 2779.JPG
View of Four Peaks with some snow
Elevation 7659 NAVD 88[1]
Prominence 3,297 ft (1,005 m)[2]
Location
Browns Peak is located in Arizona
Browns Peak
Browns Peak
Gila / Maricopa counties, Arizona, U.S.
Range Mazatzal Mountains
Coordinates 33°41′04″N 111°19′32″W / 33.684357033°N 111.325686994°W / 33.684357033; -111.325686994Coordinates: 33°41′04″N 111°19′32″W / 33.684357033°N 111.325686994°W / 33.684357033; -111.325686994[1]
Topo map USGS Four Peaks
Climbing
Easiest route Scramble, class 3

Four Peaks (Yavapai: Wi:khoba[3]) is a prominent landmark on the eastern skyline of Phoenix. Part of the Mazatzal Mountains, it is located in the Tonto National Forest 40 miles (64 km) east-northeast of Phoenix, in the 61,074-acre (247.16 km2) Four Peaks Wilderness.[4] On rare occasions, Four Peaks offers much of the Phoenix metro area a view of snow-covered peaks, and is the highest point in Maricopa County. Four Peaks contains an amethyst mine that produces top-grade amethyst.

The name Four Peaks is a reference to the four distinct peaks of a north–south ridge forming the massif's summit. The northernmost peak is named Brown's Peak and is the tallest of the four at 7,659 feet (2,334 m).[1] The remaining summits are unnamed, and from north to south are 7,644 feet (2,330 m),[5] 7,574 feet (2,309 m)[6] and 7,526 feet (2,294 m)[7] in altitude.

View of other three peaks from Browns Peak
View from desert floor of Four Peaks

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Four Peaks". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey. Retrieved 2014-02-04. 
  2. ^ "Browns Peak". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2014-02-04. 
  3. ^ Alan William Shaterian (1983), Phonology and Dictionary of Yavapai, University of California, Berkeley 
  4. ^ "Four Peaks Wilderness". Wilderness.net. Retrieved 2014-02-04. 
  5. ^ "Four Peaks North Middle, Arizona". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2014-02-04. 
  6. ^ "Four Peaks South Middle, Arizona". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2014-02-04. 
  7. ^ "Four Peaks South, Arizona". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2014-02-04. 

External links[edit]