Gentleness

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Gentleness is the value and quality of one's character. Being gentle has a long history in many, but not all cultures. Gentleness is considered to play a very important role in life.

The quality of gentleness is colloquially understood to be that of kindness, consideration and amiability. [1] Aristotle used it in a technical sense as the virtue that strikes the mean with regard to anger: being too quick to anger is a vice, but so is being detached in a situation where anger is appropriate; justified and properly focused anger is named mildness or gentleness.[2]

Another usage of gentleness is in its relation to the Christian virtue of kindness. It is one of the "fruits of the spirit" or defining noble characteristics of a Christian found in Galatians 5:22-23: "v22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, v23 gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law" (English Standard Version (ESV)).[3]

A third important usage was common in medieval times, associated with higher social classes: hence the derivation of the terms gentleman, gentlewoman and gentry. The broadening of gentle behavior from a literal sense of the gentry to the metaphorical "like a gentleman" applicable to any person was a later development.[4]

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