Good Morning Good Morning

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"Good Morning Good Morning"
Song by the Beatles from the album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Released 1 June 1967
Recorded 8 and 16 February,
13, 28 and 29 March 1967,
EMI Studios, London
Genre Rock,[1] hard rock[2]
Length 2:41
2:35 (mono version)
Label Parlophone
Writer Lennon–McCartney
Producer George Martin
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band track listing

"Good Morning Good Morning" is a song written by John Lennon[3] (credited to Lennon–McCartney) and recorded by the Beatles, featured on their 1967 album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Lyrical inspiration[edit]

Inspiration for the song came to Lennon from a television commercial for Kellogg's Corn Flakes.[3]

The line "It's time for tea and Meet the Wife" refers to a BBC sitcom, Meet the Wife.[4]

Recording[edit]

The track was recorded on 8 February 1967, with overdubs on 16 February (bass and vocals), 13 March (brass section), 28 March (backing vocals and guitar solo), and 29 March (animal noises).[5] The guitar solo was played by Paul McCartney.[5][6]

At Lennon's request, George Martin brought in Sounds Incorporated to provide the song's prominent brass backing.[4]

Lennon asked engineer Geoff Emerick to arrange the animal noises heard at beginning (and end) of the song so that each animal heard was one capable of devouring (or frightening) the animal preceding it.[4][6]

The final sound effect of a chicken clucking was so placed that it transforms into the guitar on the following track, "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)".

The chicken sound was inspired by the coda of "Caroline, No" that ended The Beach Boys' Pet Sounds album, one of the main inspirations for this whole album.[citation needed]

The song begins with the crow of a Rooster. The other animal sounds heard at the end of the song include birds, a cat, a dog, a cow, a horse, a sheep, a lion, an elephant, and a group of bloodhounds accompanying fox hunters on horseback with horns blasting, suggesting that a fox hunt was in progress.

The rapid 16th note bass drum fills were done on two bass drums according to "The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions" by Mark Lewisohn.[7]

The length of the mono version of "Good Morning Good Morning" is 2:35, whereas the stereo version (due to a lengthier fadeout of animal noise) runs 2:41.

Unusual rhythm[edit]

The song has an unusual rhythmical feel and does not use the same time signature throughout. Beats are heard in groups of 2, 3 and 4, giving the impression that the time signature changes frequently. The song has been transcribed as a mixture of 4/4, 3/4 and 5/4.[8] Most of the song uses simple time, where the beats are divided into two, but the middle eight sections use compound time, where the beats are divided into triplets.

Cover versions[edit]

On the 1988 charity album Sgt. Pepper Knew My Father, the track was covered by The Triffids.

When Mojo released Sgt. Pepper ...With A Little Help From His Friends in 2007, part of a continuing series of CDs of Beatles albums covered track-by-track by modern artists, "Good Morning Good Morning" was covered by The M's.[9]

The Easy Star All-Stars released a dub version of the song featuring Steel Pulse on their album Easy Star's Lonely Hearts Dub Band.

Personnel[edit]

Wind instruments
  • Barrie Cameron – saxophone
  • David Glyde – saxophone
  • Alan Holmes – saxophone
  • John Lee – trombone
  • Unknown – trombone
  • Unknown – french horn
  • Sounds Incorporated – brass
Production
Personnel per Ian MacDonald[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Unterberger, Richie (2009). "Good Morning Good Morning". Allmusic. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  2. ^ Elizabeth Thomson and David Gutman, "The Lennon companion: twenty-five years of comment", ISBN 0-306-81270-3, p.119.
  3. ^ a b Sheff 2000, p. 183.
  4. ^ a b c Miles 1997, pp. 320–321.
  5. ^ a b Lewisohn 1988, pp. 95, 97, 105–106.
  6. ^ a b Emerick & Massey 2006, pp. 176–179.
  7. ^ Lewisohn 1988.
  8. ^ The Beatles – Complete Scores 1993, pp. 335–341.
  9. ^ http://www.mojocovercds.com/cd/310
  10. ^ MacDonald 2005, pp. 234–235.

References[edit]