HMS Cassandra (1916)

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For other ships of the same name, see HMS Cassandra.
Career
Class and type: C-class light cruiser
Name: HMS Cassandra
Builder: Vickers Limited, Barrow in Furness
Laid down: March 1916
Launched: 25 November 1916
Commissioned: June 1917
Fate: Sunk on 5 December 1918 by mine in Gulf of Finland
General characteristics
Tons burthen: 4,190 tons
Length: 450 ft (140 m)
Beam: 43.6 ft (13.3 m)
Draught: 14 ft (4.3 m)
Propulsion: Two Brown-Curtis geared turbines
Six Yarrow boilers
Two propellers
40,000 shp
Speed: 29 knots
Range: carried 300 tons (950 tons maximum) of fuel oil
Complement: 327
Armament:

5 × BL 6-inch (152.4 mm) Mk XII guns
2 × QF 3 inch 20 cwt AA guns
2 × QF 2 pounder guns

8 × 21 inch torpedo tubes
Armour: 3 inch side (amidships)
2¼-1½ inch side (bows)
2 inch side (stern)
1 inch upper decks (amidships)
1 inch deck over rudder

HMS Cassandra was a C-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy. She was part of the Caledon group of the C-class of cruisers.

She was built by Vickers Limited, Barrow in Furness and laid down in March 1916, launched on 25 November 1916 and commissioned into the Navy in June 1917.

She had a short career, and initially joined the 6th Light Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet. She suffered a mishap when she ran aground on Fair Isle on 15 August 1917 but was successfully salvaged. Despite this she survived the war, and was sent into the Baltic to operate against the Bolsheviks. On 5 December 1918 she ran into an uncharted German minefield. She struck a mine and sank in Gulf of Finland with the loss of 10 sailors but the remaining crew of 400 was evacuated.

Rediscovery[edit]

The Estonian Navy and Estonian Maritime Museum announced in August 2010 that they had located the wrecks of HMS Cassandra, and two Flower-class sloops HMS Myrtle and HMS Gentian near Saaremaa Island in depths of 60-100 metres.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Wainwright, Martin (23 August 2010). "British warships sunk 90 years ago found off Estonian coast". The Guardian. Retrieved 2010-08-24. 

References[edit]