IC 1101

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IC 1101
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
Constellation Virgo
Right ascension 15h 10m 56.1s[1]
Declination +05° 44′ 41″[1]
Redshift 23370 ± 30 km/s[1]
Distance 1.07 Gly
Type E3[1]
Number of stars 100 trillion (1014)
Apparent dimensions (V) 1'.2 × 0'.6[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 14.7[1]
Other designations
UGC 9752,[1] PGC 54167[1]
See also: Galaxy, List of galaxies

IC 1101 is a supergiant elliptical galaxy at the center of the Abell 2029 galaxy cluster. It is 1.07 billion light years away in the constellation of Virgo and is classified as a cD class of galaxy. It was discovered on June 19, 1790 by William Herschel.

Size[edit]

The galaxy's diffuse stellar halo light extends to at least 1.4 million light years, which makes it one of the largest known galaxies in terms of breadth.[2] It is the central galaxy of a massive cluster containing a mass (mostly dark matter) of roughly 100 trillion stars.[3][4]

IC 1101 in X-ray (left) and the Abell 2029 galaxy cluster in visible light (right).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for IC 1101. Retrieved 2006-11-11. 
  2. ^ Clarke, Blanton, & Sarazin, Complex Cooling Core of A2029
  3. ^ http://arxiv.org/PS_cache/astro-ph/pdf/0209/0209205v2.pdf
  4. ^ Uson, Juan M.; Boughn, Stephen P.; Kuhn, Jeffrey R. (October 1990). "The central galaxy in Abell 2029 - an old supergiant". Science 250 (4980): 539–540. Bibcode:1990Sci...250..539U. doi:10.1126/science.250.4980.539. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 15h 10m 56.1s, +05° 44′ 41″