Ian Schrager

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Ian Schrager
Born (1946-07-19) July 19, 1946 (age 68)
New York City, New York
Ethnicity Jewish
Occupation CEO, Founder, Chairman
Spouse(s) Rita Noroña (divorced)
Tania Wahlstedt
Children with Noroña:
--Sophia Schrager
--Ava Schrager
with Wahlstedt:
--Louis Schrager
Website
The Ian Schrager Company

Ian Schrager (born July 19, 1946) is an American entrepreneur, hotelier and real estate developer. Often associated with co-creating of the Boutique Hotel category of accommodation.[1] Originally, he gained fame as co-owner and co-founder of Studio 54.

Early years[edit]

Schrager grew up in a Jewish family in Brooklyn.[2][3] In 1968 he graduated from Syracuse University with a Bachelor of Arts and then earned a Juris Doctorate from St. John's University School of Law in 1971.[4] In December 1975, after practicing law for three years, Schrager and his close friend Steve Rubell opened Enchanted Garden, a disco in Douglaston, Queens.[5] Seeing the success of Enchanted Garden, Schrager and Rubell decided to open a nightclub in Manhattan. They signed the lease for Studio 54 in January 1977 and 6 weeks later it opened.

Career[edit]

Studio 54 Era[edit]

Main article: Studio 54

In January 1977, Schrager and Rubell signed the lease for Studio 54—which was originally the Gallo Opera House and had last been used as a CBS studio. They used the space's original theatrical infrastructure to constantly change the look and feel of the club. They dramatically reinvented the club's environment, size and design multiple times a night, creating new and exciting sets that completely transformed the space into something new.[6] They often hosted special "one night only" theme parties for which the club completely metamorphosed with intricate sets and performance art.[citation needed]

Palladium[edit]

After Studio 54, Schrager and Rubell opened their next nightclub, Palladium, in the old Academy of Music building in New York City. They enlisted world-renowned Japanese architect Arata Isozaki to reimagine the old music hall into a nightclub, while still maintaining the space's integrity. Palladium was the first of its kind in that art a focal point of the club's experience. He collaborated with cutting-edge artists Francesco Clemente, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel, Kenny Scharf, and Keith Haring to create a dramatic, curated environment. Large video installations lining the dance floor were "undeniably powerful" as part of the art and architecture; throughout the night multiple dynamic installations were featured as the screens were raised and lowered like pieces of a stage set.[7] Schrager recognized the power great architecture had to influence an environment; working with Arata was just the beginning of his dabbing in architecture. He has since worked with iconic architects, artists and designers such as Philippe Starck, Herzog & de Meuron, Andree Putnam, Julian Schnabel and John Pawson to name a few.[6]

Morgans Hotel Group[edit]

In the 1980s, Schrager and his business partner Rubell turned their attention to hotels and found that their "on the pulse", keen instincts for the mood and feel of popular culture gave them a unique perspective that would allow them to significantly impact the hospitality industry just as they had done with nightlife. Their first hotel, Morgans, opened in 1984 and was an instant hit, introducing the boutique lifestyle hotel to the world.[6] Following the success of Morgans, they opened the well received and highly successful Royalton Hotel and Paramount Hotel. With these properties, Schrager introduced "lobby socializing" whereby the hotel lobby became a new kind of gathering place for hotel guests and New York City residents alike and "cheap chic", where affordable luxury was offered in a stylish and sophisticated environment.[8]

Schrager is also credited with inventing the "Urban Resort" with his Delano Hotel in Miami and Mondrian Hotel in West Hollywood. These were followed by the Hudson Hotel in New York, where he fully realized his concept "hotel as lifestyle" which he continued to refine, expanding to cities such as San Francisco with the Clift Hotel and London with St. Martins Lane Hotel and the Sanderson Hotel.[8] He stayed with the hotel business and went solo after he lost his partner Steve Rubell, who died of early exposure to AIDS on July 25, 1989.[citation needed]

Ian Schrager Company[edit]

In 2005, Schrager sold Morgans Hotel Group, a company he founded, to create Ian Schrager Company which owns, develops and manages hotels, residential and mixed use projects. Since then, he has collaborated with Julian Schnabel to transform the Gramercy Park Hotel in New York City (which he no longer owns). Schrager has also put up two residential properties: 40 Bond and 50 Gramercy Park North. 40 Bond was designed by Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron as their first residential project in America.[citation needed]

Schrager is currently working on two new hotel brands.The first hotel, PUBLIC Chicago, debuted in October 2011. The second brand, yet to be announced, will be different.[citation needed]

Schrager’s latest venture is a partnership with Marriott International, intending to create a new brand of hotel with about 100 properties to be located in cities throughout North America and South America, Europe and Asia.[9] EDITION currently has one hotel, The Istanbul EDITION, located in Istanbul Turkey. New hotels are slated to open in London (already opened), Miami Beach (opens Nov. 2014), New York City, Bangkok, Abu Dhabi, and India.

Personal life[edit]

He married Rita Noroña, a Cuban ballet dancer, on Valentine's Day 1994.[4] They have two daughters, Sophia and Ava.[3][10] On November 15, 2008, he married Tania Wahlstedt (née Garcia-Stefanovich), a former ballerina with the New York City Ballet. She has two daughters, Amanda and Lili Wahlstedt, from a previous marriage.[4] They have a son, Louis.

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Lollis, Barbara (2010-10-14). "Boutique hotel guru Ian Schrager: Can hotel lighting be too dark?". USA Today. 
  2. ^ The Guardian: "The king of Manhattan is backMammon: Ian Schrager won his style spurs with Studio 54. Now he unveils a cool new look for his hotels" by Nick Mathiason October 24, 2004
  3. ^ a b Evening Standard Magazine: "The Hippest Hotel Guy" By Charles Gandee retrieved October 13, 2012
  4. ^ a b c "Chronicle". nytimes.com. 1994-02-12. Retrieved 2014-08-15. 
  5. ^ Martin, Douglas (1988-07-11). "New Yorkers & Co". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-04. 
  6. ^ a b c New York Media, LLC (22 July 1985). New York Magazine. New York Media, LLC. pp. 28–39. ISSN 0028-7369. Retrieved 25 April 2013. 
  7. ^ Goldberger, Paul (1985-05-20). "An Appraisal; The Palladium: An Architecturally Dramatic New Discotheque". The New York Times. 
  8. ^ a b Stodghill, Ron (19 August 2007). "A Hotelier Is Breaking the Mold Once Again". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 April 2013. 
  9. ^ Stodgehill, Ron (2007-08-21). "Going Boutique: Ian Schrager and Marriott forge a partnership". International Herald-Tribune. Retrieved 2007-12-29. 
  10. ^ Elle Decor: "White Looks Right" by David Colman

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

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