Interstate 80 in Illinois

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This article is about the section of Interstate 80 in Illinois. For the entire length of the highway, see Interstate 80.

Interstate 80 marker

Interstate 80
Route information
Maintained by IDOT and ISTHA
Length: 163.41 mi[1] (262.98 km)
Existed: 1967 – present
Major junctions
West end: I-80 in East Moline
 
East end: I-80 / I-94 / US 6 at the Indiana state line in Lansing
Highway system
IL 78 IL 81

Interstate 80 (I-80) is a part of the Interstate Highway System that runs from San Francisco, California, to Teaneck, New Jersey. I-80 enters Illinois from Iowa in the west, southwest of Rapids City and runs generally eastward through East Moline, LaSalle and Joliet, before entering Indiana in Lansing. The interstate runs for approximately 163.41 miles (262.98 km) through the state.

In the 1920s, two state highways followed the general alignment that I-80 takes. In 1932 US 6 was extended through Illinois, paralleling the alignment that I-80 in Illinois. Construction started in 1957 and I-80 was completed in 1968. In the early 1990s Illinois wanted to reroute I-80 in the Quad Cities area. At the same time the section of I-80 that is concurrent with I-294, reconstructed. The partition of I-80 that is concurrent with the Kingery Expressway was rebuilt in the mid-2000s.

Route description[edit]

Interstate 80 extends from west to east across the northern portion of the state through the population centers of Quad Cities and the south Chicago suburbs. The freeway is mostly maintained by Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), with Illinois State Toll Highway Authority (ISTHA) maintaining the section of I-80 that is concurrent with the Tri-State Tollway. The busiest section of the freeway is between I-94 and IL 83 interchanges in Lansing approximately 181,200 vehicles used the freeway on average each day in 2011; in contrast the lowest traffic level was 16,400 vehicles between the IL 78 and IL 40 interchanges in Henry and Bureau Counties.[2][3] I-80 contains between a minimum of four lanes and a maximum of ten lanes total. The majority of the highway runs through farmland and urban areas.[4]

Iowa to Interstate 39[edit]

I-80 enters Illinois on the Fred Schwengel Memorial Bridge over the Mississippi River, southwest of Rapids City. After leaving the bridge the interstate has a folded diamond interchange with IL 84. The highway heads south, as a four-lane interstate, passing on the east side of Quad Cities. Eastbound I-80 traffic has access to an Illinois Welcome Center. The road has a clover leaf interchange with the western terminus of I-88. After the interchange with I-88 the highway crosses over Rock River. The interstate has a diamond interchange with U.S. Route 6 (US 6), before having an interchange with I-74 in East Moline. At this interchange I-80 turns easterly paralleling US 6 and leaving the Quad Cities area. East of Quad Cities the interstate passes through rural farmland as a four-lane interstate. The road passes south of Geneseo, with the city having one interchange at IL 82. The road passes south of Atkinson, before passing over US 6 and a railroad track.[4]

After crossing over the railroad tracks the interstate has an interchange with IL 78, north of Annawan. The interstate continues towards the east having a folded diamond interchange with IL 40, before having rest areas on both side of the roadway. The highway passes on the north side of Princeton, having an interchange with IL 26, near a commercial part of the city. I-80 passes over US 34, before leaving Princeton and having an interchange with northern terminus of I-180. The interstate has a rural interchange with IL 89, before entering LaSalle. In LaSalle the highway, has a diamond interchange with 103 Road, just north of the Illinois Valley Regional Airport. The highway has an interchange with IL 251, with commercial properties around the interchange. I-80 has an interchange with IL 351, just south of the Mitchells Grove Nature Preserve, before having an interchange with I-39/US 51.[4]

Interstate 39 to Indiana[edit]

After the interchange with I-39, I-80 leaves LaSalle, heading towards the east passing through rural farmland. Between 12th road and 14th Road the interstate passes one of old test loops used for testing different types of road surfaces in the 1950s. The interstate enters Ottawa and has an interchange with IL 23, near many commercial businesses. After IL 23 the freeway leaves Ottawa and crosses over the Fox River, before having an interchange with IL 71. The road passes through rural farmland, having a few rural interchanges before entering Morris. In Morris the roadway curves toward the northeast, having an interchange with IL 47, near many commercial properties. The highway leaves Morris, passing through farmland, having a rural interchange with a county road. Both directions of I-80 have a rest area before entering Minooka. In Minooka the interstate curves the east, before turning back towards the northeast and leaving the village. The road enters Will County by curving towards the northeast. The interstate curves towards the east, before having an interchange with I-55.[4]

After I-55, I-80 enters Joliet, passing near many warehouses. The road has an interchange with IL 7, before passing near residential. The road crosses over the Des Plaines River on the Des Plaines River Bridge. After the river the freeway has an interchange with US 52/IL 53. The interstate has an interchange with a city street, before crossing over a railroad tracks. After the railroad tracks the freeway has a diamond interchange with another city street. The road has a folded diamond interchange with US 30, before passing southeast of Potawatomi Woods County Forest Preserve. While passing through the preserve the roadway becomes a six-lane interstate. The interstate has an interchange with the southern terminus of the Veterans Memorial Tollway (I-355). The residential properties end and the highway passes through a more industrial area, before passing through the Yankee Woods (Cook County Forest Preserve).[4]

After the preserve the interstate has an interchange with I-57. I-80 joins the Tri-State Tollway (I-294) heading towards the east as a ten-lane tollway. The tollway passes over a rail yard, before having an interchange with IL 1. After IL 1 the roadway narrows to eight-lanes and passes through the Thornton Quarry. The interstate passes under the Chicago Southland Lincoln Oasis, before passing north of Wampum Lake. After passing the lake the tollway has an interchange with I-94. At this interchange with I-94 the Tri-State Tollway and I-294 both end, with I-94 running concurrent with I-80 towards the east. The concurrency between I-80 and I-94 travels on a freeway locally known as the Kingery Expressway. The interstate has a single-point urban interchange (SPUI) with IL 83 and the western end of US 6 concurrency. East of US 6 exit the freeway become a ten-lane interstate, passing near residential properties. The road enters Indiana and the freeway name becomes Borman Expressway.[4]

Services[edit]

The IDOT operates 5 rest areas and ISHTA operates one Oasis in 163 miles of interstate highway. Along I-80, there are three locations that have facilities for each direction of traffic. Parking areas are divided so passenger automobiles are separated from semi trucks. Common among most of the rest stops are restrooms, payphones with TTY capabilities, weather information, picnic areas and vending machines. The eastbound rest area near Rapid City does not allow large trucks and doesn't have vending machines or TTY capabilities.[5][6]

The Oasis is the Chicago Southland Lincoln Oasis, located in South Holland. Like most of the other Oasis this location has several fast food restaurants, gas stations, convenience store, visitors center and free wireless internet.[7] This Oasis is one of the few with an electric vehicle charging station.[8] The Chicago Southland Lincoln Oasis was originally named Lincoln Oasis, the ISHTA added Chicago Southland to the name. The change was made to better represent the area around the Oasis. The Oasis' name was changed in February 2006 changing the name officially to the Chicago Southland Lincoln Oasis.[9]

History[edit]

In 1917 many sections of named highways, made up the route that current I-80 takes through Illinois. The first was the Blue Line, it was routed between Rock Island and Princeton. The second section was named Sunset Trail and it traveled between Princeton and Ottawa, passing through LaSalle. Illinois Valley Trail went from Ottawa to Orland Park. From Orland Park to the Indiana state line no named highway was available.[10] The first state highways along the I-80 corridor were numbered IL 7 from the Rock Island east to the Orland Park area and IL 53 from Orland Park east to Indiana state line in 1923.[11][12] The United States Numbered Highway System was approved on November 11, 1926,[13] and US 32 was routed between Rock Island and Princeton. East of Princeton US 32 followed a route closer to current US 34.[14] US 6 was commissioned in Illinois in 1932 replacing US 32 west of Princeton, IL 7 between Princeton and Joliet, and IL 53 from Joliet to the Indiana state line.[15][16]

Construction of a test track for the Interstate Highway System between Utica and Ottawa began in 1952. The test track had six different segment of roadway, with different types of surfaces. One of the old test tracks can still be seen from I-80.[17] The first section of I-80 to open was the section that is known as the Kingery Expressway, this section open in 1957, as US 6.[18][19] In October 1958 the test track west of Ottawa opens to testing. The section of I-80 that is concurrent with the Tri-State Tollway was opened in 1958.[19][20] November 1960 the testing at the test track is complete.[17] The interstate opened between IL 71, near Ottawa, and I-55, near Joliet, in 1960.[21][22] The segment of roadway between IL 23 and IL 71, near Ottawa, open in 1961.[21][22] In 1962 the highway was extended west to IL 89, near LaSalle, replacing and paralleling the test track most of the way to Utica. Also in 1962, another section of road open between US 67 and IL 78.[22][23] During 1964 and 1965 the gap between IL 78 and IL 89 was completed and opened to traffic.[24][25][26][27] The north-south section of I-80 in Illinois was open in 1967.[27][28] The last section of I-80 to open was the section between I-55 and the Tri-State Tollway, with it opening 1968.[28][29]

In 1990 and 1991, IDOT proposed rerouting I-80 onto present day I-280, with current I-80 becoming I-74. IDOT listed safety concerns and cost savings as reasons to reroute I-80. Iowa officials challenged the reroute of I-80 and the routes of I-74 and I-80 never changed.[30] Between 1991 and 1992 the section of I-80 that is concurrent with the Tri-State Tollway was reconstructed and widened to eight-lanes.[31] Between 2003 and 2007 construction to widen the Kingery Expressway, the project costed $460 Million. This was the first major project on the Kingey Expressway since it was opened in the 1950s.[32] In the spring of 2011, IDOT began construction to widen a section of freeway to six-lanes between US 30 and US 45. This project had an opening ceremony on October 24, 2012, with the project costing $26 million.[33][34]

Exit list[edit]

County Location Mile[1] km Exit Destinations Notes
Scott Le Claire I-80 west
Mississippi River 0.00 0.00 Fred Schwengel Memorial Bridge; Illinois–Iowa state line
Rock Island Hampton Township 0.36 0.58 1 IL 84 / Great River Road – East Moline, Savanna
East Moline 3.49 5.62 4 I-88 east / IL 5 west / IL 92 / IL 110 east – Silvis, Sterling, Rock Falls West end of IL 110 overlap; Signed as exits 4A (west) and 4B (east)
Henry Colona 6.60 10.62 7 Colona
8.87 14.27 9 US 6
Colona Township 10.11 16.27 I-74 / I-280 west / IL 110 west – Peoria, Moline, Rock Island East end of IL 110 overlap, I-80 and I-74 switch carriageways, no exit numbers
Geneseo 19.24 30.96 19 IL 82 – Cambridge, Geneseo
Atkinson 27.03 43.50 27 Atkinson, Galva
Annawan 33.26 53.53 33 IL 78 – Prophetstown, Kewanee
Bureau Concord Township 44.85 72.18 45 IL 40 – Sterling, Peoria
Princeton 56.42 90.80 56 IL 26 – Princeton, Dixon
Selby Township 60.90 98.01 61 I-180 south – Hennepin
Ladd 70.04 112.72 70 IL 89 – Ladd, Spring Valley
LaSalle Peru 73.53 118.34 73 Plank Road
74.91 120.56 75 IL 251 – Peru, Mendota, La Salle
La Salle 76.55 123.20 77 IL 351 – La Salle
LaSalleDimmick
township line
78.54 126.40 79 I-39 / US 51 – Normal, Bloomington, Rockford Signed as exits 79A (south) and 79B (north)
North Utica 81.10 130.52 81 IL 178 – Utica, La Salle
Ottawa 90.28 145.29 90 IL 23 – De Kalb, Ottawa
Rutland Township 93.26 150.09 93 IL 71 – Ottawa, Oswego
RutlandMiller
township line
97.03 156.15 97 Marseilles
Grundy Erienna Township 104.78 168.63 105 Seneca
Morris 112.01 180.26 112 IL 47 – Yorkville, Morris
SaratogaAux Sable
township line
115.73 186.25 116 Brisbin Road
GrundyKendall
county line
Minooka 121.63 195.74 122 Minooka
Will Troy Township 126.16 203.03 126 I-55 – St. Louis, Chicago Signed as exits 126A (south) and 126B (north)
Joliet 127.74 205.58 127 Empress Road, Houbolt Road
130.54 210.08 130 IL 7 (Larkin Avenue) Signed as exits 130A (south) and 130B (north)
131.92 212.30 131 Center Street, Meadow Avenue
Des Plaines River Des Plaines River Bridge
Will Joliet 132.78 213.69 132 US 52 / IL 53 (Chicago Street) Signed as exits 132A (east/south) and 132B (west/north) eastbound
133.25 214.45 133 Richards Street
Joliet Township 134.82 216.97 134 Briggs Street
New Lenox 137.63 221.49 137 US 30 / Lincoln Highway (Maple Street)
140.00 225.31 140 I-355 north – Rockford
Frankfort Township 145.61 234.34 145 US 45 (La Grange Road)
WillCook
county line
Tinley Park 148.84 239.53 148 IL 43 (Harlem Avenue (7200 West)) Signed as exits 148A (south) and 148B (north)
Cook Country Club Hills 151.69 244.12 151 I-57 – Memphis, Chicago Signed as exits 151A (south) and 151B (north)
Hazel Crest 154.26 248.26 154 Kedzie Avenue (3200 West) Eastbound exit and westbound entrance; last free exit eastbound
West end of Toll Road
Tri State Tollway Barrier
154.95 249.37 I-294 north (Tri-State Tollway) – Wisconsin West end of I-294 overlap; westbound I-80 exits tollway via exit 5; concurrency uses the Tri-State Tollway's exit numbers
East Hazel Crest 156.11 251.23 4 Dixie Highway Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
157.58 253.60 2 IL 1 (Halsted Street (800 West))
South Holland 159.37 256.48 East end of toll road
160.40 258.14 0 I-94 west / IL 394 south – Chicago, Danville West end of I-94 overlap; east end of I-294 overlap; last free exit westbound
Lansing 161.62 260.10 161 US 6 west / IL 83 (Torrence Avenue) West end of US 6 overlap
163.41 262.98 I-80 east / I-94 east / US 6 east Indiana state line
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Illinois Technology Transfer Center (2012). "T2 GIS Data". Retrieved November 2, 2013. 
  2. ^ Illinois Department of Transportation (2011). Average Daily Total Traffic Statewide (Map). http://www.dot.il.gov/trafficmaps/adt_chicago.pdf. Retrieved November 21, 2013.
  3. ^ Illinois Department of Transportation (2011). Average Daily Total Traffic Chicago and Vicinity (Map). http://www.dot.il.gov/trafficmaps/adt_chicago.pdf. Retrieved November 21, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Google Inc. "Overview of Interstate 80 in Illinois". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=I-80+E&daddr=I-80+E%2FI-94+E&hl=en&ll=41.467428,-89.219971&spn=2.556036,4.938354&sll=41.576063,-87.523844&sspn=0.002492,0.004823&geocode=FY17egId-x-d-g%3BFX5oegIdgX3I-g&t=h&mra=me&mrsp=1,0&sz=18&z=8. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  5. ^ "Rest Area Locations". Illinois Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 29, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Illinois' Interstate Rest Area System". Illinois Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 29, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Chicago Southland Lincoln Oasis". Illinois State Highway Toll Authority. Retrieved November 30, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Rest and Refuel at a Tollway Oasis". Illinois State Highway Toll Authority. Retrieved November 30, 2013. 
  9. ^ Treiber, Rachelle (February 12, 2006). "Say hello to the Southland". Daily Southtown (Chicago). OCLC 28299027. 
  10. ^ Illinois State Highway Department (January 1, 1917). Marked Routes through Illinois (Map). Cartography by ISHD (1917 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  11. ^ 2013 (1922). Marked Routes through Illinois (Map) (1922 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  12. ^ Division of Highways (1923). State of Illinois (Map) (1923 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  13. ^ Weingroff, Richard F. (October 17, 2013). "From Names to Numbers: The Origins of the US Numbered Highway System". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved November 16, 2013. 
  14. ^ United States Department of Agriculture (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways (Map). http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth298433/m1/1/zoom/?zoom=6&lat=4386&lon=5861.5&layers=BT. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  15. ^ Automobile Deportment (1931). Official Illinois Highway Map (Map) (1931 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  16. ^ Division of Highways (April 1, 1932). Official Road Map Illinois State Highways (Map) (1932 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "Illinois Interstates: Crossroads of the Nation". Illinois Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 16, 2013. 
  18. ^ Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1956). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1956 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  19. ^ a b Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1957). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1957 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  20. ^ Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1958). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1958 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  21. ^ a b Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1960). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1960 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  22. ^ a b c Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1961). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1961 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  23. ^ Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1962). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1962 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  24. ^ Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1963). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1963 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  25. ^ Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1964). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1964 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  26. ^ Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1965). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map) (1965 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  27. ^ a b Rand McNally & Company (April 1, 1966). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map). 1in=12mi (1966 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  28. ^ a b Rand McNally & Company (January 1, 1967). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map). 1in=12mi (1967 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  29. ^ Rand McNally & Company (January 1, 1968). Illinois Official Highway Map (Map). 1in=12mi (1968 ed.). http://gis.dot.illinois.gov/HistoricalMapViewer/. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  30. ^ "Illinois Is Trying to Grab A Part of Iowa's Interstate". Omaha World-Herald. July 1, 1991. p. 8. OCLC 1585533. Retrieved November 23, 2013. 
  31. ^ McCoppin, Robert (September 29, 2000). "No pain, no gain: Tri-State drivers to suffer roadwork". The daily herald (Arlington Heights). p. 10. OCLC 18030507. Retrieved November 23, 2013. 
  32. ^ Tridgell, Guy (June 29, 2007). "$460M Kingery project rolls to complete finish". Post-Tribune (Gary). p. A15. OCLC 61322821. Retrieved November 23, 2013. 
  33. ^ "Governor Quinn Celebrates Completion of Interstate 80 Expansion Project" (Press release). Illinois Government News Network. October 24, 2012. Archived from the original on November 21, 2013. Retrieved November 21, 2013. 
  34. ^ "Interstate 80 Expansion Project Complete". Minneapolis, Minnesota: KMSP-TV. October 25, 2012. Archived from the original on November 21, 2013. Retrieved November 21, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing


Interstate 80
Previous state:
Iowa
Illinois Next state:
Indiana