Judy Biggert

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Judy Biggert
Judy Biggert Official.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 13th district
In office
January 3, 1999 – January 3, 2013
Preceded by Harris Fawell
Succeeded by Rodney L. Davis
Personal details
Born (1937-08-15) August 15, 1937 (age 77)
Chicago, Illinois
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Rody Biggert
Children Courtney
Alison
Rody
Adrienne
Residence Hinsdale, Illinois
Alma mater Stanford University, Northwestern University School of Law
Occupation attorney
Religion Episcopalian

Judith Borg "Judy" Biggert (born August 15, 1937) is the former U.S. Representative for Illinois's 13th congressional district, serving from 1999 to 2013. She is a member of the Republican Party.

Biggert was defeated in her 2012 re-election bid by former US Congressman Bill Foster. Due to redistricting, she ran in the reconfigured 11th congressional district.

Early life, education and career[edit]

Biggert was born Judith Gail Borg in Chicago on August 15, 1937, the second of four children of Alvin Andrew Borg and Marjorie Virginia (Mailler) Borg. Her father Alvin A. Borg worked for the Chicago-based Walgreen Co., the largest drugstore chain in the United States, for 41 years from 1928 to 1969, and served as its president from 1963 to 1969, succeeding Charles R. Walgreen, Jr. and succeeded by Charles R. Walgreen III.[1] Her paternal grandparents immigrated from Finland and her maternal family is of English descent.[2]

She grew up in Wilmette, Illinois, a North Shore Chicago suburb, and graduated from New Trier High School in 1955, then went to Stanford University, where she received a B.A. in international relations in 1959, then worked for a year in a women's apparel store.[3][4] She then attended Northwestern University School of Law where she was an editor of the Northwestern University Law Review from 1961 to 1963, earned a J.D. in 1963, then clerked for federal judge Luther Merritt Swygert of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit from 1963 to 1964.[5]

Biggert left her federal court law clerkship to have her children, but later did some legal work from her home for family and friends on wills, trusts and real estate.[4][6] She served on numerous boards of voluntary and civic organizations.[4][6]

Early political career[edit]

Biggert was elected to the Hinsdale Township High School District 86 Board of Education in 1978 and was a board member until 1985, serving as president from 1983 to 1985.[5] She served as chairman of the Hinsdale Plan Commission from 1989 to 1993.[5]

Illinois House of Representatives[edit]

Biggert began her legislative career in 1992, when she was elected to the Illinois House of Representatives to serve the redrawn 81st District. She was re-elected in 1994 and 1996 before running for Congress in 1998.

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

Judy Biggert delivering the keynote address on nanoscience and national competitiveness at the DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRC) Workshop in February 2003.

Committee assignments[edit]

Caucus memberships[edit]

Voting record[edit]

Interest group ratings[edit]

ACLU ACU ADA AFL-CIO AFSCME ChC CfG Con FRC ITIC LCV NTLC* NTU USCC
1999[7][8] - 60 30 11 16 - 21 - 31 - 59 96
2000[7][8] 50 68 20 0 0 60 5 94 26 70 56 100
2001[9][10] - 56 20 17 10 - - - 21 - 61 100
2002[9][10] 53 84 15 11 0 50 58 100 38 73 59 100
2003[11][12] - 60 10 13 13 - - 25 - 59 100
2004[11][12] 30 64 35 13 0 61 100 18 70 60 100
2005[13][14] - 60 20 13 0 61 54 - 22 53 89
2006[13][14] 41 64 30 21 0 54 0 100 33 59 93
2007[15][16] - 68 30 42 18 67 - - 55 65 85
2008[15][16] 27 84 35 20 14 65 35 71 38 63 94
2009 - 80 20 13 22 77 - 29 73 95

* NTLC - National Tax-Limitation Committee

Key votes[edit]

106th Congress (1999–2000)[7][8]
107th Congress (2001–2002)[9][10]
108th Congress (2003–2004)[11][12]
109th Congress (2005–2006)[13][14]
110th Congress (2007–2008)[15][16]
111th Congress, 1st Session (2009)[17]
Vote Bill
Yes Authorize the Food and Drug Administration to regulate tobacco products
Yes Rule for floor debate on the fiscal 2010 Commerce-Justice-Science appropriations bill that restricted the number of amendments to the bill that could be offered
Yes Comprehensive food safety bill, after a string of food-borne illnesses shook the public's confidence and left key industry players searching for ways to reassure consumers
Yes Cash for clunkers - replenish a federal fund that offered as much as $4,500 to car owners who traded in fuel-inefficient vehicles for newer, more fuel efficient vehicles
Yes Stupak amendment to health reform legislation to restrict insurance coverage for abortions
No State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) expansion
No Economic stimulus - $787 billion bill to help stimulate the economy through a combination of spending and tax cuts
No Mortgage loan modification - allow bankruptcy judges to write down the principal and interest rates of existing loans to a home's current market value
No Climate change mitigation - create a cap-and-trade system to limit emissions of greenhouse gases; require electric utilities to produce some of their power from renewable sources
No Student loan overhaul - establish the government as the sole provider of student loans and provide billions of dollars in savings toward various scholarship and education programs
No Health care reform legislation aimed at insuring most Americans and paid for with a controversial combination of reductions in Medicare spending and tax increases
111th Congress, 2nd Session (2010)
Vote Bill
Yes Continuing Extension Act of 2010 - $18 billion unemployment benefits extension to June 2, 2010[18]
Yes Allow repeal of " Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" policy 60 days after receipt of Pentagon recommendations due December 1, 2010[19]
No Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act / Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010[20]
No Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act[21]
No Unemployment Compensation Extension Act of 2010 - $34 billion unemployment benefits extension to November 30, 2010[22]
No Aid to states - $26 billion to fund education jobs and Medicaid[23]
No Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010 - $42 billion to provide capital to small banks and tax cuts for small businesses[24]

Political positions[edit]

  • Biggert is a member of The Republican Main Street Partnership and Republicans for Choice.
  • Biggert is one of 171 of the 178 Republican U.S. House members in the 111th Congress to have signed Grover Norquist's Americans for Tax Reform Taxpayer Protection Pledge:[25]

    "I Judy Biggert pledge to the taxpayers of the 13th Congressional District, of the state of Illinois, and to all the people of this state, that I will oppose and vote against any and all efforts to increase taxes."

  • Biggert supports making all of the Bush tax cuts permanent, regardless of income, because everyone has suffered during the recession.[26]
  • Biggert supports the partial privatization of Social Security, in which individuals could choose to voluntarily divert 2% of their Social Security tax payments from paying Social Security beneficiaries into individual private accounts which they could invest in the stock market and which they could pass on to their heirs.[27][28]
  • Biggert supports the repeal (or defunding to prevent implementation) of the 2010 Democratic health care reform and its replacement with Republican health care reform.[28]
  • Biggert opposes allowing individuals less than 65 years of age to buy into Medicare.[29]
  • Biggert opposes any comprehensive immigration reform that provides a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants and supports the message sent by Arizona SB 1070.[28]
  • Biggert opposes public financing of federal election campaigns, and supports the elimination of all limits on campaign contributions with immediate and full disclosure of contributions.[30]
  • Biggert supports repeal of the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy, but opposes repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act which prohibits federal recognition of same-sex marriages.[28]

Political campaigns[edit]

1998[edit]

In 1998, Biggert narrowly defeated conservative state Senator Peter Roskam in the Republican primary, the real contest in this ancestrally Republican district. Biggert earned 61% of the vote to win the seat opened up by the retirement of U. S. Representative Harris Fawell. In 2006, Roskam was elected to Congress from another district.

2006[edit]

In 2006, Biggert's share of the vote in the general election fell below 60% for the first time in her Congressional career.

2008[edit]

In 2008, Biggert received less than 54% of the vote overall (and less than 50% of the vote in Will County) in winning reelection to her sixth term in Congress in her first general election campaign against a financially competitive opponent, businessman Scott Harper. In 2008, Democratic U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin was reelected with 60% of the vote and Democrat Barack Obama won 54% of the vote in the 13th Congressional District,[15] with even Biggert's Republican predecessor, Fawell, supporting Obama.[31]

2010[edit]

2012[edit]

In the redistricting following the 2010 census, the Democratic-controlled state legislature significantly altered Illinois' congressional map, splitting Biggert's district. Her district was renumbered as the 11th District, and made significantly more Democratic even though it contains 50 percent of Biggert's former territory. A portion of her former district that included Biggert's home in Hinsdale was combined with the heavily Democratic Chicago North Side-based 5th District. Biggert opted to run in the new 11th against the Democratic nominee, former 14th District Congressman Bill Foster.[32]

Electoral history[edit]

Illinois House, 81st Representative District (1992–1996)[edit]

  • 1992 Republican primary[33]
    • Judy Biggert - 5,284  (37.52%)
    • James P. McCarthy - 3,498  (24.83%)
    • Todd Vandermyde - 1,861  (13.21%)
    • Andrew J. (Andy) Clark - 1,758  (12.48%)
    • John Curry - 1,684  (11.96%)
  • 1992 general election[34]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 28,655  (68.93%)
    • David M. Briggs (D) - 12,918  (31.07%)
  • 1994 Republican primary[35]
    • Judy Biggert - 6,100  (53.89%)
    • James P. McCarthy - 5,219  (46.11%)
  • 1994 general election[36]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 22,227  (78.51%)
    • Bill Chalberg (D) - 6,085  (21.49%)
  • 1996 Republican primary[37]
    • Judy Biggert - 14,142  (100.00%)
  • 1996 general election[38]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 28,597  (71.19%)
    • Dave Brockway (D) - 11,573  (28.81%)

U.S. House, Illinois 13th Congressional District (1998– )[edit]

  • 1998 Republican primary[39]
    • Judy Biggert - 24,482  (45.03%)
    • Peter Roskam - 21,784  (40.07%)
    • David J. Shestokas - 2,574  (4.73%)
    • Michael J. Krzyston - 2,566  (4.72%)
    • Andrew J. Clark - 1,926  (3.54%)
    • Walter Marksym - 1,035  (1.90%)
  • 1998 general election[40]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 121,889  (61.02%)  $1,294,853*[8]
    • Susan W. Hynes (D) - 77,878  (38.98%)  $222,656*[8]
  • 2000 Republican primary[41]
    • Judy Biggert - 39,121  (100.00%)
  • 2000 general election[42]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 193,250  (66.18%)  $381,623*[8]
    • Thomas Mason (D) - 98,768  (33.82%)
  • 2002 Republican primary[43]
    • Judy Biggert - 70,691  (100.00%)
  • 2002 general election[44]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 139,456  (70.25%)  $464,054*[12]
    • Tom Mason (D) - 59,069  (29.75%)
  • 2004 Republican primary[45]
    • Judy Biggert - 46,861  (99.51%)
    • Bob Hart (write-in) - 231  (0.49%)
  • 2004 general election[46]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 200,472  (65.02%)             $542,733*[12]
    • Gloria Schor Andersen (D) - 107,836  (34.98%)  $42,129*[12]
    • Mark Alan Mastrogiovanni (write-in) - 4  (0.00%)
  • 2006 Republican primary[47]
    • Judy Biggert - 52,900  (79.59%)
    • Bob Hart - 13,564  (20.41%)
  • 2006 general election[48]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 119,720  (58.33%)  $1,014,819*[15]
    • Joseph Shannon (D) - 85,507  (41.66%)   $225,842*[15]
    • Mark Alan Mastrogiovanni (write-in) - 7  (0.00%)
  • 2008 Republican primary[49]
    • Judy Biggert - 58,533  (77.28%)
    • Sean O'Kane - 17,206  (22.72%)
  • 2008 general election[50]
    • Judy Biggert (R) - 180,888  (53.55%)  $1,585,536*[15]
    • Scott Harper (D) - 147,430  (43.65%)    $1,070,201*[15]
    • Steve Alesch (Green) - 9,402  (2.78%)
    • Theodore Knapp (write-in) - 51  (0.02%)
  • 2010 Republican primary[51]
    • Judy Biggert - 58,294  (100.00%)
  • 2010 general election

*  campaign expenditures
** campaign contributions (through September 30, 2010)

Personal life[edit]

On September 21, 1963,[52] she married Rody Patterson Biggert, Jr. Rody and Judy Biggert lived in Chicago, then Wilmette,[53] before moving to Hinsdale in 1971, when Rody's mother sold them her home, the extensively remodeled 1864 mansion of Hinsdale's founder, William Robbins, in the Robbins Park Historic District.[54] The Biggerts have four children: Courtney Caverly, Alison Cabot,[55] Rody Biggert,[53] and Adrienne Morrell,[56][57] and nine grandchildren.[5]

Since 2004, Biggert's youngest daughter Adrienne Morrell has been a registered lobbyist for Health Net, the sixth largest publicly traded for-profit managed healthcare company; previously Morrell was a lobbyist with America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), the chief health insurance industry lobby, after having served as an aide to former seven-term Illinois 13th District U.S. Rep. Harris Fawell, Biggert's predecessor in Congress.[56][57]

In 2008, multimillionaire Biggert was the second wealthiest—after U.S. Rep. Bill Foster (D-14)—in Illinois' 21-member Congressional delegation, and the 82nd wealthiest member in the U.S. House.[58]

Biggert was president of the Junior Board of the Chicago Travelers Aid Society in 1969, and president of the Junior League of Chicago from 1976 to 1978, chairman of board of directors of the Visiting Nurse Association of Chicago in 1978, and president of the Oak School elementary school PTA in Hinsdale from 1976 to 1978. She was a member of the board of directors of the Salt Creek Ballet from 1990 to 1998. She was also a Sunday school teacher at Grace Episcopal Church in Hinsdale from 1974 to 1984, and an American Youth Soccer Organization assistant soccer coach in 1983.[5][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ . (August 11, 1939). "Walgreen Jr. is new head of drug chain". Chicago Tribune. p. 25. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
    . (December 12, 1963). "Shift major executives of Walgreens". Chicago Tribune. p. G7. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  C. R. Walgreen Jr., president of the drug chain since 1939, was elected to the newly created post of chairman. He continues as chief executive officer. A. A. Borg, former vice president and treasurer, was elected president. A 35-year veteran of the company, he becomes principal administrative officer.
    . (September 5, 1969). "Walgreen III is elected president". Chicago Tribune. p. C9. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  He will succeed A. A. Borg who will retire Sept. 30.
    . (May 10, 1973). "Former Walgreen chief Borg dies". Chicago Tribune. p. B12. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
    . (October 24, 1984). "Marjorie V. Borg". Chicago Tribune. p. A13. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  died Tuesday in a fire in her Northbrook home. Mrs. Borg was the widow of Alvin A. Borg, president of Walgreen Co. from 1963 to 1969.
  2. ^ "Judy Biggert ancestry". Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  3. ^ . (July 9, 1956). "Summer". Chicago Tribune. p. B7. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  Photo caption: Miss Judy Borg (left) and Miss Nancy Igoe at North Shore Country Club's pool.
    Bascom, Jim (August 14, 1957). "Ivy styles climb for college men; many items can add distinction". Chicago Tribune. p. A1. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  Photo caption: Judy Borg's dress is an imported cotton twill ($19.95), from the College Cupboard of Marshall Field & Co.
  4. ^ a b c Page, Eleanor (January 16, 1977). "Biggert leads Junior League in new project". Chicago Tribune. p. D3. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  She became a law clerk to a federal judge, leaving to have her first child. She now practices on her own, handling mostly real estate and estate business for family and friends.
  5. ^ a b c d e f DelliSanti, Patricia; Perruso, Alison (eds.) (2009). "Biggert, Judith Borg". Who's Who in America 2010 (64th ed.). New Providence, NJ: Marquis Who's Who. p. 387. ISBN 978-0-8379-7023-3. 
  6. ^ a b Jouzaitis, Carol (March 26, 1982). "Executives' wives have made coping a full-time job". Chicago Tribune. p. A23. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  I worked as a lawyer for a year, and had every intention of continuing, but there was pressure from all sides to have a family. Then I had three children in three years and there was no way I could continue to work. So what I did was to get very involved in organizations even when the children were young. I've been on lots and lots of boards, the Junior League of Chicago and Hinsdale District 86...I do some (legal work on) wills and real estate, but it's been 15 years since I really practiced law...Physically, I couldn't work full time, have a husband and a house to take care of. In the voluntary sector, you can pick the time you want to spend.
  7. ^ a b c Nutting, Brian; Stern, Amy H. (eds.) (2001). CQ's politics in America 2002, the 107th Congress. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, Inc. pp. xviii–xx, 331–332. ISBN 1-56802-652-2 Check |isbn= value (help). 
  8. ^ a b c d e f Barone, Michael; Cohen, Richard E.; Cook Jr., Charles E. (2001). The almanac of American politics 2002. Washington, D.C.: National Journal. pp. 13–19, 535–537. ISBN 0-89234-099-1. 
  9. ^ a b c Hawkins, David; Nutting, Brian (eds.) (2003). CQ's politics in America 2004, the 108th Congress. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, Inc. pp. xix– xxii, 342–343. ISBN 1-56802-813-X. 
  10. ^ a b c Barone, Michael; Cohen, Richard E. (2003). The almanac of American politics 2004. Washington, D.C.: National Journal. pp. 13–19, 565–567. ISBN 0-89234-105-X. 
  11. ^ a b c Koszczuk, Jackie; Stern, Amy H.(eds.) (2005). CQ's politics in America 2006, the 109th Congress. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Press. pp. xviii–xxii, 353–354. ISBN 193311612 Check |isbn= value (help). 
  12. ^ a b c d e f Barone, Michael; Cohen, Richard E. (2005). The almanac of American politics 2006. Washington, D.C.: National Journal. pp. 13–19, 591–593. ISBN 0-89234-111-4. 
  13. ^ a b c Koszczuk, Jackie; Angle, Martha (eds.) (2007). CQ's politics in America 2008, the 110th Congress. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Press. pp. xix–xxii, 347–348. ISBN 978-0-87289-545-4. 
  14. ^ a b c Barone, Michael; Cohen, Richard E. (2007). The almanac of American politics 2008. Washington, D.C.: National Journal. pp. 13–19, 571–573. ISBN 978-0-89234-116-0. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h Barone, Michael; Cohen, Richard E. (2009). The almanac of American politics 2010. Washington, D.C.: National Journal. pp. 13–19, 523–525. ISBN 978-0-89234-119-1. 
  16. ^ a b c McCutcheon, Chuck; Lyons, Christina L. (eds.) (2009). CQ's politics in America 2010, the 111th Congress. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Press. pp. xxii–xxvi, 349–350. ISBN 978-1-60426-602-3. 
  17. ^ Austin, Jan (ed.) (2010). "Key votes; Democrats prevail on top issues, struggle to keep troops in line". CQ 2009 almanac, 111th Congress, 1st session, vol. 65. Washington, D.C.: CQ-Roll Call Group. pp. C–3–C–7, C–16–C–21. ISBN 978-1-879617-15-5. 
  18. ^ Hulse, Carl (April 16, 2010). "President signs bill to extend jobless aid". The New York Times. p. A18. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    . (April 15, 2010). "Roll call 211 – On motion to concur in the Senate amendment". Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Levin, Sander M. (April 15, 2010). "H.R.4851 Continuing Extension Act of 2010". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
  19. ^ Herszehhorn, David M.; Hulse, Carl (May 28, 2010). "House votes to allow ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ repeal". The New York Times. p. A1. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    . (May 27, 2010). "Roll call 317 – On agreeing to the amendment". Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Murphy, Patrick J. (May 27, 2010). "H.AMDT.672 Repeals "Don't Ask Don't Tell"". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Skelton, Ike (June 28, 2010). "H.R.5136 National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
  20. ^ Pear, Robert; Herszenhorn, David M. (March 22, 2010). "Congress sends White House landmark health overhaul". The New York Times. p. A1. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    . (March 21, 2010). "Roll call 165 – On motion to concur in Senate amendments". Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Rangle, Charles B. (March 23, 2010). "H.R.3590 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    . (March 21, 2010). "Roll call 167 – On passage". Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Spratt, John M., Jr. (March 30, 2010). "H.R.4872 Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
  21. ^ Herszenhorn, David M. (July 1, 2010). "Finance overhaul approved by House". The New York Times. p. B1. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    . (June 30, 2010). "Roll call 413 – On agreeing to the conference report". Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Frank, Barney (July 21, 2010). "H.R.4173 Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
  22. ^ Hulse, Carl (July 22, 2010). "House passes jobless benefit extension". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    . (July 22, 2010). "Roll call 463 – On motion to concur in the Senate amendment to the House amendment to the Senate amendment". Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Rangel, Charles B. (July 22, 2010). "H.R.4213 Unemployment Compensation Extension Act of 2010". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
  23. ^ Hulse, Carl (August 11, 2010). "House passes bill to aid states and public schools". The New York Times. p. A14. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    . (August 10, 2010). "Roll call 518 – On motion to concur in Senate amendment to House amendment to Senate amendment". Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Rangel, Charles B. (August 10, 2010). "H.R.1586 Education jobs and Medicaid funding bill". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
  24. ^ Taylor, Andrew (Associated Press) (September 24, 2010). "Obama gets small-business bill". The Washington Post. p. A13. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    . (September 23, 2010). "Roll call 539 – On motion to concur in the Senate amendment". Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
    Frank, Barney (September 27, 2010). "H.R.5297 Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010". THOMAS (Library of Congress). Retrieved 2010-11-01. 
  25. ^ Current Taxpayer Protection Pledge Signers
  26. ^ a b c Lourgos, Angie Leventis (October 22, 2010). "Congressional campaign is a rematch; Harper got 44% against Biggert in '08. Now he's back". Chicago Tribune. p. 3 (Chicagoland Extra). Retrieved 2010-11-02. 
  27. ^ Doubek, Madeleine (December 9, 1998). "Biggert makes presence felt at meeting on Social Security". Daily Herald (Arlington Heights). Retrieved 2010-11-02.  Biggert's own belief that citizens should be allowed to set up personal accounts and invest their own Social Security taxes in the stock market got plenty of attention Tuesday from congressional leaders.
  28. ^ a b c d . (September 23, 2010). "Candidate Questionnaires - U.S. House, Dist. 13: Judy Biggert". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved 2010-11-02. 
  29. ^ Broder, John M. (January 7, 1998). "Clinton proposes opening Medicare to those 55 to 65". The New York Times. p. A1. Retrieved 2010-11-02. 
    Grady, William (June 28, 1998). "Biggert seeking unity with GOP foes; candidacy of Hynes may help her do that". Chicago Tribune. p. 1 (Metro DuPage). Retrieved 2010-11-02.  She opposes public funding of congressional campaigns, which Hynes favors, and opposes President Clinton's proposal to lower the age of eligibility for Medicare.
    . (October 26, 1998). "13th District hopefuls discuss tax code". Daily Herald (Arlington Heights). p. 1 (Neighbor). Retrieved 2010-11-02.  Question: What should Congress do to ensure continued viability of Medicare? Judy Biggert: The first thing we should not do is lower the Medicare eligibility age to 55, as the president has proposed.
  30. ^ Grady, William (July 16, 1998). "Money pouring in for Biggert; candidates spar over donations in 13th District". Chicago Tribune. p. 1 (Metro DuPage). Retrieved 2010-11-02.  Hynes has voiced support for public funding of congressional campaigns, a proposal Biggert opposes. Biggert favors an end to the limits on campaign contributions—now $1,000 for individuals and $5,000 for political action committees—but would require quicker disclosure of all donations.
  31. ^ Winfield, Paige (November 2, 2008). "Will local voters be swayed by love for Obama or dislike for Blagojevich?". Naperville Sun. p. 5. Retrieved 2010-11-02.  Harris Fawell, former congressman for the 13th Congressional District, is backing a Democrat for president for the first time in his life. The 79-year-old Republican said there's a good chance that Obama will carry the county. "He's the best I have seen, the most qualified I've ever seen running for president," Fawell said.
  32. ^ Toeplitz, Shira. Race Ratings: Illinois Democrats' Map makes GOP Sweat. Roll Call, 2011-10-06.
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  35. ^ Illinois State Board of Elections (1994). State of Illinois official vote cast at the primary election, general primary March 15, 1994. Springfield, Ill.: State Board of Elections. p. 96. OCLC 4960540. 
  36. ^ Illinois State Board of Elections (1994). State of Illinois official vote cast at the general election November 8, 1994. Springfield, Ill.: State Board of Elections. p. 75. OCLC 4960532. 
  37. ^ Illinois State Board of Elections (1996). State of Illinois official vote cast at the primary election, general primary March 19, 1996. Springfield, Ill.: State Board of Elections. p. 150. OCLC 4960540. 
  38. ^ Illinois State Board of Elections (1996). State of Illinois official vote cast at the general election November 5, 1996. Springfield, Ill.: State Board of Elections. p. 78. OCLC 4960532. 
  39. ^ Illinois State Board of Elections (1998). "Ballots cast, general primary - 3/17/1998, 13th Congress". Springfield, Ill.: State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 
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  52. ^ Middleton, Mary (February 26, 1963). "Lectures will benefit school; Borg-Biggert". Chicago Tribune. p. A3. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
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  53. ^ a b Page, Eleanor (November 23, 1968). "Bridge leads to romance". Chicago Tribune. p. N_A11. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  The Rody P. Biggerts [Judith Borg] of Wilmette welcomed their third child and first son, Rody Jr., Nov. 4.
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  55. ^ . (August 25, 1996). "Alison Biggert, Christopher Cabot". The New York Times. p. 54. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  56. ^ a b Sweet, Lynn (November 17, 1998). "Finding their way around the House". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 6. Retrieved 2010-10-29.  Biggert has a sense of urgency in part because she pledged to serve only three terms... Biggert's daughter Adrienne, 24, lives in Washington and worked for Rep. Harris Fawell (R-Ill.), whose retirement opened up the seat Biggert won. "I think she really liked working on the Hill in the House," said Biggert, who felt bad because "she doesn't feel comfortable going back and doing that again."
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External links[edit]

Illinois House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas J. McCracken, Jr. (R)
Illinois Representative for the 81st Representative District
1993–1999
Succeeded by
Patricia R. "Patti" Bellock (R)
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Harris W. Fawell (R)
U.S. Representative for the 13th Congressional District of Illinois
1999–2013
Succeeded by
Rodney L. Davis