Kilworth

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For other places with the same name, see Kilworth (disambiguation).
Kilworth
Cill Uird
Village
Kilworth is located in Ireland
Kilworth
Kilworth
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 52°08′31″N 8°16′34″W / 52.142022°N 8.276138°W / 52.142022; -8.276138Coordinates: 52°08′31″N 8°16′34″W / 52.142022°N 8.276138°W / 52.142022; -8.276138
Country Ireland
Province Munster
County Cork
Elevation 72 m (236 ft)
Population (2006)[1]
 • Urban 645
Time zone WET (UTC+0)
 • Summer (DST) IST (WEST) (UTC-1)
Irish Grid Reference W808987

Kilworth (Irish: Cill Uird) is a village in north County Cork, located about 2 kilometres north of Fermoy near the river Funcheon. The M8 Cork–Dublin motorway passes nearby. Kilworth has an Army Camp, located on the R639 regional road between Mitchelstown and Fermoy.

Amenities and attractions[edit]

Kilworth village.
  • Kilworth Arts centre is an intimate theatre venue in the centre of the village. It was previously used as a church.
  • Kilworth (Glenseskin) forest is located about 1 km from the village centre.

Economy[edit]

Teagasc has an agricultural research facility based at Moorepark, just outside Kilworth. The village is within commuting distance of many centres of employment, including Cork city.

History[edit]

The name Kilworth comes from Irish (Gaelic) "Cill Úird", literally meaning "church of the order". In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, Kilworth was a notable settlement on the old Dublin to Cork road, prior to the construction of the T6/old N8/R639 road from Fermoy to Cashel and from Cashel to Urlingford between 1739 and the mid-nineteenth century. Numerous accounts and maps dating from the 1680s tell of armies and travellers journeying from Fermoy to Clogheen and onwards to Dublin via Kilworth and Kilworth Mountain.[2]

Kilworth's most notable resident was David Richard Pigot, who became Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer and one of the foremost Irish judges of his day. He was born in Kilworth about 1796, son of John Pigot, a doctor.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CSO
  2. ^ See, for example, David Broderick, The First Toll Roads: Ireland's Turnpike Roads, 1729–1858 (Cork, 2002); J. H. Andrews, Shapes of Ireland: Maps and Their Makers, 1564–1839 (Dublin, 1997); Taylor and Skinner's Maps of the Roads of Ireland (Dublin, 1778); and Herman Moll's New Map of Ireland (1714).