List of French football champions

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The French football champions are the winners of the highest league of football in France, Ligue 1. Since the National Council of the French Football Federation voted in support of professionalism in French football in 1930, the professional football championship of France has been contested through Ligue 1, formerly known as Division 1 from 1933–2002.[1][2] Prior to this, the first division championship of French football was contested through a league ran by the Union des Sociétés Françaises de Sports Athlétiques (USFSA), an organization that supported amateur sport. The USFSA's league ran from 1894–1919 and awarded 22 league titles before being suspended in 1915 due to World War I and the creation and success of the Coupe de France, which had quickly become the country's national competition.[3] The USFSA returned in 1919 changing the league into numerous regional amateur leagues that awarded no league title. This system lasted from 1919–1926. In 1926, the first division's reigns were handed over to the French Football Federation. The federation organized and ran a league composed of the regional amateur league champions called the Championnat de France amateur from 1927–1929 and awarded three titles before the league was converted to the professional league that exists today in 1932.[1]

The first champions of French football were Standard Athletic Club, who defeated The White Rovers 2–0 in Courbevoie on 6 May 1894.[4] The initial championship match was held on 29 April but finished 2–2, so the match was replayed.[4] Standard went on to win the French championship four more times over the next seven years before RC Roubaix took control of the league becoming the first French club to win three straight titles beginning in 1902.[5] Following Roubaix's success, the ownership of the amateur league title began rotating back and forth from the north of France to the south of France with Marseille eventually winning the last amateur title in 1929.[5]

The first French football champions of the professional era were Olympique Lillois, a predecessor of Lille, who defeated Cannes 4–3 on 14 May 1933 at the Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir in Colombes.[5] Sète were crowned champions the following season and, in 1939, became the first professional club in France to win two titles.[5] Following the conclusion of World War II, Saint-Étienne became the model club of the country winning four consecutive titles from 1966–1970.[5] The club won all its 10 titles in a span of 25 years. Marseille repeated Saint-Étienne's feat of four consecutive titles from 1988–1992. It would take the club another 17 years to win another title. During the hiatus between Marseille's title in 1992 and the club's most recent in 2010, Lyon established themselves as a top club winning their first title in 2002. The title started a national record-breaking streak of seven successive league championships with the streak coming to an end following the 2008–09 season when Bordeaux eclipsed them winning their sixth title.[6][7]

Saint-Étienne and Marseille have the most titles in French football having won ten each.[8][9] The majority of Saint-Étienne's titles came during the 1960s and 70s when the club was led by managers Jean Snella, Albert Batteux, and Robert Herbin. Marseille has nine professional league titles and one amateur title which they won in the 1928–29 season.[9] The club initially equaled Saint-Étienne's number of titles won during the 1992–93 season, but the title was stripped after it was discovered by the Ligue de Football Professionnel (LFP) that the club's president Bernard Tapie had bribed the opposition's players.[10][11] Tapie was later found guilty of bribery and sentenced to two years in prison.[12] In the 2009–10 season, Marseille equaled Saint-Étienne's number of titles, amateur or professional.[13][14] Currently, Nantes are third with eight titles and they are followed by AS Monaco and Lyon each with seven.[15][16][17]

Champions[edit]

Amateur era (1894–1929)[edit]

1895–96 champions Club Français, pictured here in 1898
1918–19 champions Le Havre, pictured playing against CA Paris in 1920
1926–27 champions CA Paris, pictured at the end of the following season
Year[4] Winner Runner up Third place
1893–94 Standard Athletic Club The White Rovers
1894–95 Standard Athletic Club The White Rovers
1895–96 Club Français The White Rovers
1896–97 Standard Athletic Club The White Rovers
1897–98 Standard Athletic Club Club Français
1898–99 Le Havre Club Français
1899–1900 Le Havre Club Français
1900–01 Standard Athletic Club Le Havre
1901–02 Roubaix RCF Paris
1902–03 Roubaix RCF Paris
1903–04 Roubaix Suisse Paris
1904–05 Gallia Club Paris Roubaix
1905–06 Roubaix CA Paris
1906–07 RCF Paris Roubaix
1907–08 Roubaix RCF Paris
1908–09 Helvétique Marseille CA Paris
1909–10 Tourcoing Helvétique Marseille
1910–11 Helvétique Marseille RCF Paris
1911–12 Saint-Raphaël AS Française
1912–13 Helvétique Marseille Rouen
1913–14 Olympique Lillois Sète
1918–19 Le Havre Marseille
1926–27 CA Paris Amiens AC Marseille
1927–28[nb 1] Stade Français
1928–29 Marseille Club Français

Professional era (1932–)[edit]

Alain Giresse played on the Bordeaux teams that won back-to-back titles in 1983–84 and 1984–85.
A middle-aged man wearing a white shirt, black shorts and white trainers, standing on a grass field.
Paul Le Guen managed Lyon to three league titles.
A middle aged man, wearing a dark blue top
Laurent Blanc led Bordeaux to their first league title of the millennium in 2008–09.
Didier Deschamps played on two of Marseille's ten championship winning teams and also managed the club to one league title.
Year Winner[2][21][22] Runner up Third place
1932–33 Olympique Lillois Cannes
1933–34 Sète Fives Marseille
1934–35 Sochaux Strasbourg RCF Paris
1935–36 RCF Paris Lille Strasbourg
1936–37 Marseille Sochaux RCF Paris
1937–38 Sochaux Marseille Sète
1938–39 Sète Marseille RCF Paris
1945–46 Lille Saint-Étienne RC Roubaix
1946–47 Roubaix–Tourcoing Stade Reims Strasbourg
1947–48 Marseille Lille Stade Reims
1948–49 Stade Reims Lille Marseille
1949–50 Bordeaux Lille Stade Reims
1950–51 Nice Lille Le Havre
1951–52 Nice Bordeaux Lille
1952–53 Stade Reims Sochaux Bordeaux
1953–54 Lille Stade Reims Bordeaux
1954–55 Stade Reims Toulouse Lens
1955–56 Nice Lens AS Monaco
1956–57 Saint-Étienne Lens Stade Reims
1957–58 Stade Reims Nîmes AS Monaco
1958–59 Nice Nîmes RCF Paris
1959–60 Stade Reims Nîmes RCF Paris
1960–61 AS Monaco RCF Paris Stade Reims
1961–62 Stade Reims RCF Paris Nîmes
1962–63 AS Monaco Stade Reims Sedan
1963–64 Saint-Étienne AS Monaco Lens
1964–65 Nantes Bordeaux Valenciennes
1965–66 Nantes Bordeaux Valenciennes
1966–67 Saint-Étienne Nantes Angers
1967–68 Saint-Étienne Nice Sochaux
1968–69 Saint-Étienne Bordeaux Metz
1969–70 Saint-Étienne Marseille Sedan
1970–71 Marseille Saint-Étienne Nantes
1971–72 Marseille Nîmes Sochaux
1972–73 Nantes Nice Marseille
1973–74 Saint-Étienne Nantes Lyon
1974–75 Saint-Étienne Marseille Lyon
1975–76 Saint-Étienne Nice Sochaux
1976–77 Nantes Lens Bastia
1977–78 AS Monaco Nantes Strasbourg
1978–79 Strasbourg Nantes Saint-Étienne
1979–80 Nantes Sochaux Saint-Étienne
1980–81 Saint-Étienne Nantes Bordeaux
1981–82 AS Monaco Saint-Étienne Sochaux
1982–83 Nantes Bordeaux Paris Saint-Germain
1983–84 Bordeaux AS Monaco Auxerre
1984–85 Bordeaux Nantes AS Monaco
1985–86 Paris Saint-Germain Nantes Bordeaux
1986–87 Bordeaux Marseille Toulouse
1987–88 AS Monaco Bordeaux Montpellier
1988–89 Marseille Paris Saint-Germain AS Monaco
1989–90 Marseille Bordeaux AS Monaco
1990–91 Marseille AS Monaco Auxerre
1991–92 Marseille AS Monaco Paris Saint-Germain
1992–93[nb 2] Paris Saint-Germain AS Monaco
1993–94 Paris Saint-Germain Marseille Auxerre
1994–95 Nantes Lyon Paris Saint-Germain
1995–96 Auxerre Paris Saint-Germain AS Monaco
1996–97 AS Monaco Paris Saint-Germain Nantes
1997–98 Lens Metz AS Monaco
1998–99 Bordeaux Marseille Lyon
1999–2000 AS Monaco Paris Saint-Germain Lyon
2000–01 Nantes Lyon Lille
2001–02 Lyon Lens Auxerre
2002–03 Lyon AS Monaco Marseille
2003–04 Lyon Paris Saint-Germain AS Monaco
2004–05 Lyon Lille AS Monaco
2005–06 Lyon Bordeaux Lille
2006–07 Lyon Marseille Toulouse
2007–08 Lyon Bordeaux Marseille
2008–09 Bordeaux Marseille Lyon
2009–10 Marseille Lyon Auxerre
2010–11 Lille Marseille Lyon
2011–12 Montpellier Paris Saint-Germain Lille
2012–13 Paris Saint-Germain Marseille Lyon
2013–14 Paris Saint-Germain AS Monaco Lille

Championships by club[edit]

Georges Bereta won six league titles while playing for Saint-Étienne.
Juninho Pernambucano won seven straight league titles with Lyon from 2002–2008.
Rank Club Number of titles Years of titles
1
Saint-Étienne
10
1957, 1964, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1981,
Marseille
10
1929, 1937, 1948, 1971, 1972, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 2010
3
Nantes
8
1965, 1966, 1973, 1977, 1980, 1983, 1995, 2001
4
AS Monaco
7
1961, 1963, 1978, 1982, 1988, 1997, 2000
Lyon
7
2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008
6
Stade de Reims
6
1949, 1953, 1955, 1958, 1960, 1962
Bordeaux
6
1950, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1999, 2009
8
Standard Athletic Club
5
1894, 1895, 1897, 1898, 1901
Roubaix
5
1902, 1903, 1904, 1906, 1908
10
Nice
4
1951, 1952, 1956, 1959
Paris Saint-Germain
4
1986, 1994, 2013, 2014
12
Helvétique Marseille
3
1909, 1911, 1913
Lille
3
1946, 1954, 2011
14
Le Havre
2
1899, 1900
RCF Paris
2
1907, 1936
Sochaux
2
1935, 1938
Sète
2
1934, 1939
Olympique Lillois
2
1914, 1933
19
Club Français
1
1896
Gallia Club Paris
1
1905
Tourcoing
1
1910
Saint-Raphaël
1
1912
CA Paris
1
1927
Stade Français
1
1928
Roubaix-Tourcoing
1
1947
Strasbourg
1
1979
Auxerre
1
1996
Lens
1
1998
Montpellier
1
2012

Bold indicates clubs currently playing in the top division.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ For the 1927–28 and 1928–29 seasons, the French Football Federation eliminated the league table format used in the previous season and used a playoff system. No third-place match was held.[5][18][19][20]
  2. ^ Marseille were stripped of their title by the LFP after being found guilty of bribery. No winner was declared for the season.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gilles Gauthey, Le football professionnel français, Paris, 1961, p.18. Éditée et diffusée par l'auteur. OCLC 41613347
  2. ^ a b "Palmarès". Ligue 1 (Ligue de Football Professionnel). Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  3. ^ "French find recipe for success". Union of European Football Associations. 21 February 2010. Retrieved 11 June 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c Pauron, Frédéric (24 April 2004). "France 1892–1919". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Pauron, Frédéric (21 May 2010). "France – List of Champions". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  6. ^ "Lyon, France's enduring champions". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  7. ^ Lyttleton, Ben (1 June 2009). "Bordeaux claim Ligue 1 title to justify faith in Laurent Blanc". The Guardian (Guardian Media Group). Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  8. ^ "Palmarès". AS Saint-Étienne. Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  9. ^ a b "L'OM... et le Championnat" (in French). Olympique de Marseille. Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  10. ^ a b Baring, Louise (2 August 1992). "Un homme d'affaires: Bernard Tapie". The Independent (Independent News and Media). Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  11. ^ a b Bidwell, Nick (13 July 1993). "Scandal leaves a stain on the white shirt of Marseille". The Independent (Independent News and Media). Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  12. ^ Halpin, Padraic (8 January 2006). "Match fixing: a history". The Guardian (Guardian Media Group). Retrieved 2 July 2010. 
  13. ^ "Marseille 3–1 Stade Rennes". ESPNsoccernet (ESPN). 5 May 2010. Retrieved 25 May 2010. 
  14. ^ "L'OM champion de France !". Ligue 1 (in French) (Ligue de Football Professionnel). 5 May 2010. Retrieved 5 May 2010. 
  15. ^ "L'histoire du FC Nantes" (in French). FC Nantes. Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  16. ^ "Palmares" (in French). AS Monaco FC. Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  17. ^ "Le palmarès par compétitions" (in French). Olympique Lyonnais. Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  18. ^ "Division d' Excellence: Saison 26-27". Pages Perso Orange. Retrieved 9 July 2010. 
  19. ^ "Division d' Excellence: Saison 27-28". Pages Perso Orange. Retrieved 9 July 2010. 
  20. ^ "Division d' Excellence: Saison 28-29". Pages Perso Orange. Retrieved 9 July 2010. 
  21. ^ "Ligue 1 (ex-D1 jusqu'en 2001–2002)" (in French). French Football Federation. Retrieved 7 June 2010. 
  22. ^ "Historique Classments". Ligue 1 (in French) (Ligue de Football Professionnel). Retrieved 16 June 2010. 

External links[edit]