List of discontinued photographic films

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All the films on this page have either just been discontinued, have been updated or the company making the film no longer exists. Often films will be updated and older versions discontinued without any change in the name.

Agfa[edit]

Agfapan APX 100[edit]

  • Type: Black and white negative
  • Speed: ISO 100, DIN 21
  • Available formats: 35mm, 120, sheet film (9x12, 10.2x12.7, 13x18 cm)
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 9.0
  • Latitude:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 150 line/mm
  • History: Introduced in the early 1990s in response to the introduction of flat crystal technology by Kodak and Ilford, however maintaining a cubic crystalline structure, which is preferred by some users for its forgivingness and distinctive look.

Agfapan APX 400[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative
  • Speed: ISO 400, DIN 27
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 14.0
  • Latitude:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 110 line/mm
  • History: Introduced in the early 1990s in response to the introduction of flat crystal technology by Kodak and Ilford, however maintaining a cubic crystalline structure, which is preferred by some users for its forgivingness and distinctive look.
  • Primary usage: General purpose film of elevated speed
  • General characteristics: While modern flat crystal films of the 400 ASA class may have noticeably higher resolution and lower granularity, the user community appreciates the tonal range of this material and its distinctive look.

ADOX test-produced a slightly improved version of the material as Adox Pan 400 during 2010. Due to Fotokemika stopping general production in 2012, the film has not been released, yet.[1]

Agfa Ultra 100[edit]

  • Type: Colour negative
  • Speed: ISO 100, DIN 21
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 3.8
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation: High
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 140 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 60 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage: Landscapes and nature.
  • General characteristics: Very high saturation film.

AgfaColor Optima 100[edit]

  • Type: Colour negative
  • Speed: ISO 100, DIN 21
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 4.0
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 140 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 50 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • General characteristics:

AgfaColor Optima 200[edit]

  • Type: Colour negative
  • Speed: ISO 200, DIN 24
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 4.3
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 130 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 50 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • General characteristics:

An un-masked variant of the emulsion continues to be available. Applied to a polyester base, it is produced by the surviving Belgian part of Agfa-Gevaert for aerial photography. The material is cut to the usual 120 and 135 formats by Maco and sold as Rollei Digibase CN 200 Pro.

AgfaColor Optima 400[edit]

  • Type: Colour negative
  • Speed: ISO 400, DIN 27
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, 220
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 4.5
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 130 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 50 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • General characteristics:

AgfaColor Portrait 160[edit]

  • Type: Colour negative
  • Speed: ISO 160, DIN 23
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, 220
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 3.5
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 150 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 60 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • General characteristics:

Agfachrome RSX II 50[edit]

  • Type: Color Reversal
  • Speed: ISO 50, DIN 18
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 10.0
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 135 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 55 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • General characteristics:

Agfachrome RSX II 100[edit]

  • Type: Colour Reversal
  • Speed: ISO 100, DIN 21
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 10.0
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 130 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 50 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • General characteristics:

Agfachrome RSX II 200[edit]

  • Type: Colour Reversal
  • Speed: ISO 200, DIN 24
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 12.0
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation: Slightly subdued perceived by many users as natural and producing flattering skin tones
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 120 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 50 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • General characteristics:

The surviving Belgian part of Agfa-Gevaert continues producing the emulsion. It is applied to a polyester base for aerial photography. The resulting Aviphot Chrome 200 PE1 is cut to the usual 120 and 135 formats by Maco and distributed as Rollei Digibase CR 200 Pro.

Agfa Scala 200x[edit]

  • Type: Black and White Reversal
  • Speed: ISO 200, DIN 24
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120, 4x5 Sheet Film
  • Granularity: (x 1000): RMS 11.0
  • Latitude:
  • Resolving power: contrast 1000:1 120 line/mm, contrast 1.6:1 50 line/mm
  • History:
  • Primary usage:
  • General characteristics:

Fujifilm[edit]

Neopan 1600[edit]

  • Type: black and white
  • Speed: ISO 1600
  • Available formats: 35 mm
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation: N/A
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replaced by nothing
  • Primary usage: Sports, journalism, stage shows, low light

Velvia 100F[edit]

  • Type: color reversal
  • Speed: ISO 100
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation: N/A
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replaced by nothing
  • Primary usage:

Provia 400X[edit]

  • Type: color reversal
  • Speed: ISO 400
  • Available formats: 35 mm, 120
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation: N/A
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replaced by nothing
  • Primary usage:

Neopan 400[edit]

  • Type: black and white
  • Speed: ISO 400
  • Available formats: 35 mm
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Colour saturation: N/A
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Replaced by nothing
  • Primary usage:

Polaroid[edit]

Type 55[edit]

  • Type: Black and White Pos/Neg instant film
  • Speed: 50/18° (pos), 35/16° (neg)
  • Available formats: 4x5 Sheet film
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Resolving power:
  • History: Discontinued by Polaroid in 2008; production process licensed out
  • Primary usage: Test shots, fine art

Dan-Di Films[edit]

manufactured in Belgium

Dan-Di Orthochromatic Safety film[edit]

  • Type: Safety Film - Orthochromatic
  • Available formats: 116 N-16(known)
  • Speed: Rating of High Speed (?) on box EM-N°
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Resolving Power:
  • History:
  • Primary Usage:

Kodak Films[edit]

It has been suggested that some former Kodak products may be resurrected by other brands under a different name.

Kodak Verichrome Safety Film [edit]

  • Launch Date: 1931
  • Discontinued: 1956
  • Suggested Alternative: Kodak Verichrome Pan
  • Type: Orthochromatic
  • Speed:
  • Available formats: Various including V-116
  • Granularity:
  • Latitude:
  • Resolving power:
  • History: WRATTEN & WAINWRIGHT VERICHROME was introduced around 1907/8 offering greater spectral sensitivity and speed compared to contemporary emulsions of the time. The company was bought by KODAK in 1912. In 1931 KODAK released the film on a safety base as a Roll film, with greater latitude and finer grain than the KODAK NC (Non-Curling) Film that had been the standard since 1903. Kodak Verichrome Safety film was eventually replaced by Kodak Verichrome Pan film in 1956. Photo of Verichrome V-116 package courtesy American Package Museum.
  • Primary usage:

Kodak Verichrome Pan [edit]

  • Launch Date: 1956
  • Discontinued: 1995? (127 format), 2002? (120 format)
  • Suggested Replacement: Kodak Professional T-MAX 100 Film/100TMX KODAK PROFESSIONAL PLUS-X 125 Film / 125PX. For more information, see KODAK Publications F-4016, KODAK PROFESSIONAL T-MAX Films, and F-4018, KODAK PROFESSIONAL PLUS-X 125 Film, available from www.kodak.com/go/bwfilms
  • Type: panchromatic (B&W)
  • Speed: Medium Speed (EI 125)(Early 620: EI 80 Daylight, 60 Tungsten, as printed on film leader paper along with exposure settings advice).
  • Available formats: 120, 127, 116, 126, 616, 110, 620, 8" x 5 feet for Cirkut cameras
  • Granularity: Diffuse rms Granularity 9 Extremely fine- Read at a net diffuse density of 1.0, using a 48-micrometre aperture, 12X magnification.
  • Latitude: Wide
  • Resolving power: Good
  • History: KODAK VERICHROME PAN Film was a panchromatic replacement for KODAK VERICHROME film, which was orthochromatic.
  • Film Characteristics: KODAK VERICHROME Pan (VP) Film is a medium-speed (EI 125) panchromatic film that features extremely fine grain. Its excellent gradation and wide exposure latitude make it a good choice for general-purpose applications. This film has characteristics similar to those of KODAK PLUS-X Pan Professional Film, but does not have retouching surfaces.
  • Primary usage: General Purpose

Kodak Super-XX[edit]

  • Type: black & white print(?) film

Kodak Technical Pan[edit]

Kodak Professional BW400CN[edit]

Kodak Professional TRI-X 320[edit]

Kodachrome[edit]

  • Launch Date: 1935
  • Discontinued: 2009
  • Suggested Replacement: Kodak Ektachrome E100d
  • Type: color reversal (slide film)
  • Speed: ASA 6, 25, 40, 64, 200

Ektachrome E200[edit]

  • Launch Date: ?
  • Discontinued: March 2011
  • Suggested Replacement: Kodak Ektachrome E100G
  • Type: color reversal
  • Speed: ISO 200

http://www.kodak.com:80/global/en/professional/products/films/e200/e200Index.jhtml?pq-path=13319/1229/13373

Plus X 125[edit]

  • Launch Date: 1954
  • Discontinued: March 2011
  • Suggested Replacement: Kodak T-Max 100
  • Type: black and white
  • Speed: ISO 125

Panatomic X [edit]

  • Launch Date: 1933
  • Discontinued: 1987
  • Suggested Replacement:Kodak T-MAX 100
  • Type: black and white
  • Speed: ISO 32
  • Granularity: Very fine grain

ELITE Chrome Extra Color 100[edit]

  • Launch Date: 1991
  • Discontinued: 2012
  • Suggested Replacement: Ektar 100
  • Type: color reversal
  • Speed: ISO 100
  • Granularity: Fine grain

ELITE Chrome 100[edit]

  • Launch Date: 1989
  • Discontinued: 2012
  • Suggested Replacement: Ektar 100
  • Type: color reversal
  • Speed: ISO 100
  • Granularity: Fine grain

E100G[edit]

  • Launch Date: 2000
  • Discontinued: 2012
  • Suggested Replacement: Ektar 100
  • Type: color reversal
  • Speed: ISO 100
  • Granularity: Very Fine grain

E100VS[edit]

  • Launch Date: 2002
  • Discontinued: 2012
  • Suggested Replacement: Ektar 100
  • Type: color reversal
  • Speed: ISO 100
  • Granularity: Fine grain

E100GX[edit]

  • Launch Date: 2001
  • Discontinued: 2009
  • Suggested Replacement: Ektar 100
  • Type: color reversal
  • Speed: ISO 100
  • Granularity: Extremely Fine grain

Aerochrome III Infrared Film 1443 - Ektachrome Professional Infrared EIR[edit]

  • Discontinued: 2009[2]
  • Type: infrared-sensitive false-color reversal
  • Granularity: Extremely Fine grain

More Kodak Professional films[edit]

These following lists from Kodak detail the most recent emulsions that have been discontinued in their Professional Film line. These lists do not include Kodak Commercial films, the type available in the average grocery/drug store. Kodak just discontinued the last of its remaining positive/slide emulsions (still listed as available on that page as of 3-22-2012). All of the films on that page (second in this list) are discontinued and will be NLA once current stock has been sold, which Kodak estimates will be between the end of summer and the end of 2012 (http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/colorReversalIndex.jhtml?pq-path=1229).

Kodak Professional Negative films: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/databanks/filmDatabankColorNeg.jhtml

Kodak Professional Positive films:

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/databanks/filmDatabankColorRev.jhtml?pq-path=13700/14472/14474

Kodak Professional Black & White films:

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/databanks/filmDatabankBW.jhtml

Fotokemika[edit]

Efke ISO 25[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative

Was produced in 35mm (KB25), 120 (R25) and sheet size (4x5, 5x7 and 8x10).

Efke ISO 50[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative

Was produced in 35mm (KB50), 120 (R50) and sheet size (4x5, 5x7 and 8x10).

Efke ISO 100[edit]

  • Type: black and white negative

Was produced in 35mm (KB100), 120 (R100), 127 (R100-127) and sheet size (4x5, 5x7 and 8x10).

EFKE IR820[edit]

  • Type: infrared black and white negative

Was produced in 35mm, 120, 127 and sheet size (4x5, 5x7 and 8x10).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.adox.de/english/ADOX%20Films/Premium/ADOX-PAN-400/PAN400.html
  2. ^ Exhibition notice, University of the Arts, London. Accessed 25 April 2014.