Magallanes, Sorsogon

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Magallanes
Municipality
Map of Sorsogon with Magallanes highlighted
Map of Sorsogon with Magallanes highlighted
Magallanes is located in Philippines
Magallanes
Magallanes
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 12°50′N 123°51′E / 12.833°N 123.850°E / 12.833; 123.850Coordinates: 12°50′N 123°51′E / 12.833°N 123.850°E / 12.833; 123.850
Country Philippines
Region Bicol (Region V)
Province Sorsogon
Legislative district 1st district of Sorsogon
Barangays 34
Government[1]
 • Mayor Augusto Manuel M. Ragragio
Area[2]
 • Total 150.09 km2 (57.95 sq mi)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 35,443
 • Density 240/km2 (610/sq mi)
Demonym Magalleño
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
ZIP code 4705
Dialing code 56

Magallanes is a third class municipality in the province of Sorsogon, Philippines. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 35,443 people.[3]

According to renowned historians and anthropologists such as Domingo Abella, Luis Camara Dery, Merito Espinas, F. Mallari, Norman Owen, Mariano Goyena del Prado, et al., Magallanes is also the present location of the ancient settlement of Ibalong.[4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

History[edit]

Known to the Spaniards as Encoienda de Yguey, with two visitas - Parina and Caditaan. The present townsite of Magallanes is the, then, visita of Parina. With the approval of the Spanish colonial government, the town was founded on April 30, 1859, upon the initiative of Spanish abaca trader, Don Manuel de Castro. The name of the town was chosen in honor of the first circumnavigator of the world, Ferdinand Magellan.[11]

De Castro, who was operating a astillero, became the first gobernadorcillo.

Magallanes became an independent parish on December 11, 1863.

It is in Magallanes where Gibalong (now sitio San Isidro) is located, at the mouth of Ginangra River, reputed to be the place where the first Christian mass in Luzon was celebrated. The name ibalon or Tiera de Gibalong, which is also used to identify the Bicol region at the time, came from the name of the place - Gibalong.

It is also in Magallanes where Bagatao Island can be found. It is considered as one of the most important and biggest shipyards at the time, where some of the biggest and most magnificent Spanish galleons were built. It was then known as the Real Astillero de Bagatao

Barangays[edit]

Magallanes is politically subdivided into 34 barangays.[2]

  • Aguada Norte
  • Aguada Sur
  • Anibong
  • Bacalon
  • Bacolod
  • Banacud
  • Biga
  • Behia
  • Binisitahan del Norte
  • Binisitahan del Sur
  • Biton
  • Bulala
  • Busay
  • Caditaan
  • Cagbolo
  • Cagtalaba
  • Cawit Extension
  • Cawit Proper
  • Ginangra
  • Hubo
  • Incarizan
  • Lapinig
  • Magsaysay
  • Malbog
  • Pantalan
  • Pawik
  • Pili
  • Poblacion
  • Salvacion
  • Santa Elena
  • Siuton
  • Tagas
  • Tulatula Norte
  • Tulatula Sur

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Magallanes
Year Pop.   ±% p.a.  
1990 24,754 —    
1995 28,707 +3.01%
2000 31,315 +1.75%
2007 34,418 +1.36%
2010 35,443 +0.98%
Source: National Statistics Office[3][12]
Barangay Population (2007) Population (2010)[3]
Aguada Norte
1,540 1,533
Aguada Sur
1,111 1,142
Anibong
434 471
Bacalon
604 603
Bacolod
1,012 992
Banacud
1,340 1,375
Biga
1,152 1,147
Behia
2,321 2,336
Binisitahan del Norte
835 871
Binisitahan del Sur
684 647
Biton
1,973 1,982
Bulala
478 497
Busay
460 486
Caditaan
3,151 3,157
Cagbolo
939 1,047
Cagtalaba
511 539
Cawit Extension
1,420 1,591
Cawit Proper
1,018 1,051
Ginangra
629 715
Hubo
809 802
Incarizan
1,362 1,360
Lapinig
680 692
Magsaysay
243 239
Malbog
342 382
Pantalan
1,245 1,249
Pawik
647 660
Pili
1,293 1,302
Poblacion
613 617
Salvacion
888 1,041
Santa Elena
1,063 1,073
Siuton
1,703 1,828
Tagas
508 511
Tulatula Norte
767 860
Tulatula Sur
643 645

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Municipalities". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Province: Sorsogon". PSGC Interactive. Makati City, Philippines: National Statistical Coordination Board. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay: as of May 1, 2010". 2010 Census of Population and Housing. National Statistics Office. Retrieved 20 February 2013. 
  4. ^ Abella, D. (1954). Bikol Annals: A Collection of Vignettes of Philippine History. Manila.
  5. ^ Dery, L. C. (1991). From Ibalon to Sorsogon : A Historical Survey of Sorsogon Province to 1905. Quezon City: New Day Publishers.
  6. ^ Espinas, M. (1996). The Ibalong : The Bikol Folk Epic-fragment. Manila: University of Santo Tomas Publishing House.
  7. ^ Mallari, F. (1990). Ibalon Under Storm and Siege : Essays on Bicol History: 1565-1860. Cagayan de Oro City.
  8. ^ Owen, N. (1999). The Bikol blend : Bikolanos and Their History. Quezon City: New Day Publishers.
  9. ^ Prado, M. G. (1981). Ibalon : Ethnohistory of the Bikol Region. Legazpi City: AMS Press.
  10. ^ Reyes, J. C. (January–February 1979). The Ibalen Epic - A Window to Bicols Pre-history. Boletin Eclesiastico de Filipinas v. 53 nos. 590-591, pp. 61-92.
  11. ^ page 24, Tracing from Solsogon to Sorsogon, 2nd Edition (2007), ISBN 978-971-814-099-4
  12. ^ "Province of Sorsogon". Municipality Population Data. LWUA Research Division. Retrieved 25 July 2013. 

External links[edit]